Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th World Congress on Biotechnology Crowne Plaza , New Delhi, India.

Day 3 :

  • Track 1: Biotechnology in Agriculture
Location: Hall-1
Speaker

Chair

Veena Agrawal

University of Delhi, India

Speaker

Co-Chair

Rajinder Singh Chauhan

Jaypee University of Information Technology, India

Session Introduction

M. C. Diez

Universidad de La Frontera, Chile

Title: Biopurification system for a pesticides mixture degradation

Time : 09:00-09:20

Speaker
Biography:

M Cristina Diez Jerez has completed her PhD at Universidad Estadual de Campinas SP, Brasil. She is a Full Professor at Chemical Engineering Department and the Director of Research & Development Center For Wastes Management (CIDGRO), La Frontera University, Chile. She has published more than 85 papers in ISI journals in the last 10 years.

Abstract:

A biopurification system based on the adsorption and degradation capacity of a biomixture prepared with top soil, straw and peat (1:2:1) and covered with a vegetal cover is able to treat a complex mixture of pesticides. The degradation of atrazine (ATZ), chlorpyrifos (CHL) andiprodione (IPR) was studied in a biopurification system installed in containers of 1 m3 packed with 125 kg of biomixture (bulk density (ρ) 0.29 g mL-1) with and without a vegetal cover (mixture of Festuca sp. and Lolium perenne) and operated at hydraulic load of 1.2 L of tap water per day. A water solution (484 mg L-1) containing a mixture of formulated ATZ, CHL and IPR (35 mg of each active ingredient (a.i.) kg-1 of biomixture) was sprayed over the surface of the containers. Besides, containers without pesticides were used as control. The concentration of the pesticides and their main metabolites and phenoloxidase and dehydrogenase activity were measured at three depth (15, 35 and 55 cm) in the biomixture during 60 days. Organic acid exudation from the vegetal cover were also analysed. The degradation of the pesticides was high (>95%) and was highest in containers with vegetal cover. Dehydrogenase activity was similar in all treatments except in container without pesticides and vegetal cover (low values). Contrarily, phenoloxide activity was highest in control container. Succinic, malic and oxalic acids were found in high concentration in contaminated container with vegetal cover, instead of citric acid was highest in uncontaminated container.

Speaker
Biography:

Rajinder Singh Chauhan has completed his PhD with specialization in Plant Biotechnology at HPAU, Palampur in 1991. He has joined as Assistant Professor and played a key role in the establishment of Biotech Center at HPAU till 1997. He then moved to the USA as a Visiting Scientist at the University of Wisconsin, Madison through Young Scientist Fellowship schemes, DBT Overseas Associate and DST BOYSCAST of the Ministry of Science and Technology, Goverment of India (1997-2004). He had advanced trainings in high throughput genomics at various Institutes in the USA such as The Institute of Genomics Research, Maryland; Waksman Institute of Microbiology at Rutgers University; Crop Biotech Center, Texas A and M University, College Station. He then joined back as an Associate Profesoor at HPAU, Palampur in 2004 and set up a DBT funded Bioinformatics Center as a Program Coordinator. He is the Recipient of Jawahar Lal Nehru Academic Award of the ICAR and the PranVohra Award of the Indian Science Congress Association. His current research program is aimed at gene discovery for industrial phytochemicals. He is currently working as Dean (Biotechnology) and provided Leadership to rank the Department among top biotech schools in India.

Abstract:

Picrorhiza kurroa is an important medicinal herb used in various herbal formulations containing iridoid glycosides picroside-I (P-I) and picroside-II (P-II) as major constituents. P. kurroa has broad range of pharmacological activities like hepato-protective, anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antioxidant, neuroprotective, etc. The proper concentration and ratio of P-I and P-II are important in determining quality and efficacy of P. kurroa-based herbal drug formulations. Majority of the plant material used in the preparation of herbal drugs is collected from the wild, thereby necessitating quality control on raw material. Picrosides contents in rhizomes can be influenced by several factors such as environment (altitude, light intensity, soil conditions, etc.), genetic makeup of different strains of P. kurroa and time of collection of plant material. Different batches of plant material may differ in quality due to these factors. Determination of P-I and P-II contents in different organs of different age groups revealed that mature rhizomes should be harvested while not uprooting the entire underground biomass which not only results in loss of plant material from its natural habitat but also results in variations in the contents of P-I and P-II. We have identified P. kurroa strains which contain desired amounts of P-I and P-II contents and details of their in vitro conservation and usage will be presented. Genetically superior strains coupled with proper harvesting practice can provide authentic raw material for the preparation of herbal formulations of P. kurroa.

Hemant Sood

Jaypee University of Information Technology, India

Title: In vitro production of hypericin rich shoots of Hypericum perforatum

Time : 09:40-10:00

Speaker
Biography:

Hemant Sood has completed her PhD in 2009 from Jaypee University of Information Technology with specialization in Medicinal Plant Biotechnology. She has published in several national and international journals including 4 patents filed in India. She is recipient of a National Young Scientist Award of Indian Science Congress Association for the year 2011. Her research program is aimed at developing cell culture technologies in high value medicinal herbs. She is funded by the DBT, DST and NMPB, Government of India.

Abstract:

Hypericum perforatum is a valuable medicinal herb possessing anti-depressant, anti-microbial, anti-viral and cytotoxic properties. Hypericin being one of the major compounds of this plant is used as a sensitizer in the photodynamic cancer therapy. In the current study, rapid method for micropropagation and in vitro production of hypericin was developed using shoot apices of H. perforatum. An average of 36.3 number of shoots were induced from single explants within 5-6 days of culturing on MS medium supplemented with KN (3 mg/L)+sucrose 3% (w/v)+agar-agar 0.9% (w/v). Highest hypericin content of 0.119 µg per mg was observed in shoots grown on MS medium containing sucrose (3%), IBA (3 mg/l), KN (1 mg/l) and agar (0.9%) at 25±2o C under light conditions with incubation for two months in an optimized culture room conditions. This study indicated that in vitro cultured H. perforatum shoots possess biosynthetic potential for hypericin production which can be further exploited for its up scaling under controlled growth conditions.

Jyoti Kumari

ICAR-National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, India

Title: Plant Genetic Resources: Advancing Conservation and Use through Biotechnology

Time : 10:00-10:20

Speaker
Biography:

Jyoti Kumari has completed her PhD from Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi in the discipline of Genetics. She has been working in the Indian Council of Agricultural Research since 2005 in various capacities and worked on varietal development and molecular breeding of pulses and plant genetic resources of wheat crop. Currently she is working as a Senior Scientist (Plant Breeding) at National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, New Delhi. She has published more than 20 research papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Plant genetic resource is the basic foundation block of sustainable agriculture on which food and nutritional security rely globally. Era of new generation plant breeding has generated loss of genetic diversity and genetic erosion in the cultivars in the field. Biotechnology with its various possible applications on plant genetic resource management has rekindled the hope of regeneration of our vanishing plant genetic resources particularly with the recombinant DNA technology and genetic engineering that enable us to splice genes across the plant and animal kingdoms. Traditionally, it has contributed significantly in the safe conservation of difficult material in the gene bank (cryopreservation), tissue and organ culture, artificial seeds and rescue of rare embryos, etc. In future it holds promise in conservation of genomic resources like DNA library, vectors, RNA library etc which are indispensable tools for post-genomic research, be it characterization of a species or functional analysis of genes or comparative genomics or plant breeding. This tool will also help in removal of redundancy in gene bank, trait novelty detection; core set development and genetic integrity study. The bioinformatics tool will also handle huge genomic resources and help comprehending utilizable component of gene and tracking of particular germplasm or gene with accuracy and thus may resolve many IPR issues among the stakeholders. Simultaneously the search for newer genes in the conserved gene bank material for biotic/abiotic stresses and quality would be possible with allele mining and association mapping technology.

Abhishek Sharma

Indian Institute of Technology, New Delhi, India

Title: Biotechnological Potential of Industrial Residues as Substrates for Bionematicide Development

Time : 10:20-10:40

Speaker
Biography:

Abhishek Sharma is currently working as a Research Associate under Professor Satyawati Sharma at Centre for Rural Development and Technology, IIT Delhi. He has a Master’s degree in Microbiology from HNB Garhwal University, MPhil (Biotechnology) from Alagappa University and PhD (Environmental Microbiology) from IIT Delhi. He has over ten years experience in teaching and research. His research interests lie in utilization of biomass and agro industrial wastes through biotechnological means for the production of bio-fertilizers, compost, bio-ethanol, bio-pesticides, secondary metabolites and enzymes. He has one patent and more than 15 publications in peer-reviewed journals, conference proceedings and books to his credit.

Abstract:

The sustainable growth of bio-pesticide industry depends on the cheap and readily available nutrient inputs into fermentation media as substrates. The utilization of by-products of bio-fuel industries such as non-edible oil cakes and biogas slurry (BGS) is nowadays very much preferred to enhance the commercial feasibility of bioprocess technology. In present study, a novel process was designed to produce the dust formulation of biocontrol fungal agent Paecilomyces lilacinus 6029 using nitrogen rich Karanja deoiled cake as major substrate against root-knot nematodes- Meloidogyne incognita through solid-state fermentation. In order to achieve optimal fungal growth and pathogenicity, the cake was further combined with carbon rich BGS (sundried) in a certain proportion. The results indicated that among the four combinations of Karanja cake/BGS tested, 40/60 ratio gave maximum spores (9.3×108 spores/g) and pathogenicity (94% egg mass hatching inhibition). The remarkable increment in nematicidal efficacy of P. lilacinus cultured on Karanja deoiled cake and BGS might have been due to enhanced production of various nematicidal metabolites such as serine protease, leucinostatins and low molecular weight fatty acids as seen in our studies. We believe that the present study would provide an impetus to future research in this area to enhance the utilization of industrial residues as sources of nitrogen and carbon for economic viability of the bioprocesses industry.

Sunita Gaind

ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, India

Title: Encapsulation of Beneficial Microorganisms as Agricultural Inoculants

Time : 11:10-11:30

Speaker
Biography:

Sunita Gaind has completed her PhD in Microbiology from Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi and currently working as a Senior Scientist at Division of Microbiology, IARI. She has published about 50 scientific papers in peer reviewed journals, 15 book chapters and 30 popular/technical articles. She is also associated with the Editorial Board of some peer reviewed journals.

Abstract:

The increasing demand for green and environment friendly agricultural practices is driving the use of fertilizers based on beneficial microorganisms. Inoculation of these microorganisms to soil not only enhances the specific nutrient availability and its uptake by plant but may also exert positive effect on plant growth due to their multifunctional traits. The choice of technology for developing microbial inoculants is the key to their successful application and subsequent effect on crop growth. The direct exposure of microbial strain to harsh soil environment during early stages of their establishment affect the performance of carrier based and liquid microbial formulations under field application and necessitate the need to find an alternative technology. The encapsulation of microorganisms, though currently experimental in the field of agriculture has been suggested as one of the alternate that can overcome the limitations of above cited microbial formulations. Encapsulation in a polymeric matrix protects the microbes from native flora competition and releases the cells gradually. Liberation of entrapped microbes from the encapsulated beads happens when the polymer is slowly degraded by the native soil microorganisms and has a direct relation with the soil biological activity. However, selection of microbial strain and suitable bio-encapsulation method need due attention.

Speaker
Biography:

Susmita Shukla has completed her PhD in Biotechnology from Pandit Ravi Shankar Shukla University. She is currently serving as an Assistant Professor at Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University, Noida. She is having more than 12 years of Teaching and Research Experience. She has been awarded with IASc-INSA-NASI Fellowship and Career Advancement Award from DBT (Department of Biotechnology, Government of India). She is also recepient of DBT travel grant for participating in an international conference at Singapore. Currently, she is having an ongoing project under BioCARe scheme of DBT. She has published more than 14 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

Abstract:

Pulses form a major source of protein for a huge section of India particularly for the poor, backward classes and are an important part of the vegetarian diet. Vigna radiate, Vigna unguiculata, Vigna mungo, Vigna acontifolia, Vigna umbellate are some of the key dietary staples of millions of people of India and across Asia. The annual worldwide production of the species is very high and almost all of the production is in the developing countries. The productivity of pulses in India is low and thus to make the pulses production internationally competitive, the yields on an average need to be increased. In the present study, comparative analysis of few Vigna species was studied to get fast and efficient regeneration protocol. Effect of media, growth factors was studied and best suitable protocol was developed.

Heikham Farida Devi

National Institute of Technology, India

Title: Leaves extract of Damdei, lamkafor the synthesis of mixedoxide of zinc nanoparticles

Time : 11:50-12:05

Speaker
Biography:

Heikham Farida Devi has completed her MSc from Delhi University and she is currently pursuing her PhD from National Institute of Technology, Manipur, India.

Abstract:

Considering the present scenario of environment, an environmental benign approach was employed for the synthesis of nanoparticles following the twelve principle of green chemistry. Croton caudatum commonly known by the name Damdei was used for the fabrication of zinc oxide nanoparticles. Damdei belong to family Euphorciaceae, this plant have anticancer properties, curative medicinal qualities for diabetes, malaria, indigestion etc. Dotriacontamol, β-amyrin and β-sitosterol are detected in the roots and barks of this plant. Presence of Phytochemicals like flavoids, alkaloids and phenolic compounds in the leaves of this plant is responsible for its reducing properties. Zinc oxide nanoparticles were synthesized through reduction of zinc nitrate by leaves extract of Damdei at room temperature. Hash reducing agents and solvent has not been used in this work. Particles fabricated using this method was characterized using HRTEM, SAED, IR-Spectroscopy, UV-Vis spectroscopy and XRD. HRTEM images revealed that zinc oxide nanoparticles are of 2-5 nm in size and crystalline in nature. XRD confirmed the mixed oxide (ZnO+ZnO2) nature of this synthesized zinc nanoparticles showing surface plasma resonance band at 318 nm. Method adopted in this work for the synthesis of nanoparticles provide certain advantages over other conventional methods like easy to scale up, less time consuming, simple and less toxicity

Speaker
Biography:

Neeta Pathaw has completed the experimental work of her thesis in the Department of Botany, North Eastern Hill University, China. She has published one international paper and has participated in many national and international symposiums. She is currently working as a Guest Faculty in the Department of Botany, North Eastern Hill University, China.

Abstract:

Plant diseases have emerged as a major threat to the global food security. Although, plants have no immune system; they possess a variety of defense mechanisms which include synthesis of pathogenesis related proteins in response to fungal/bacterial infection. The paper reports on the purification and characterization of a 32 kD protein which has growth inhibitory activity against Fusarium oxysporum, Trichoderma viride and Rhizopus stolonifer var stolonifer from seeds of Sechium edule (Jacq) Swartz. The protein, designated as SeAFP32, inhibited mycelial growth of Fusarium oxysporum, Trichoderma viride and Rhizopus stolonifer var stolonifer with an IC50 of 10±0.14, 20±0.035 and 8±0.05 µg ml-1 respectively. SYTOX Green uptake assay indicated that the protein affected the permeability properties of the fungal cell membranes. MALDI-TOF/MS analysis of the tryptic digested 32 kD SeAFP32 revealed 100% homology with β-glucosidase from Arabidopsis thaliana (acc. no. BAD94819). The 3D homology model of SeAFP32 developed with Modeller 9.10 with rice β-glucosidase protein (PDB ID: 3GNO) as template, confirmed it the high degree of homology of SeAFP32 with β-glucosidase family of proteins. In silico docking of p-nitrophenyl β-D-glucopyranoside (pNPG) on 3D model of SeAFP32 confirmed the presence and stearic position of the conserved Glu105, Ser75 and Glu161 on the docking domain. Glutamic acid at P’105 has been identified as the active site nucleophile required for the enzymatic hydrolysis of the glycosidic bond.

Speaker
Biography:

Upasna Chettry is a Junior Research Fellow availing INSPIRE Fellowship in the Department of Botany, North Eastern Hill University, Shillong. She has participated in many national conferences and symposium. She has been awarded Best Poster presentation by PLOS at NGBT Conferences, 2014.

Abstract:

Cereal grains are important and rich sources of phytochemicals that have significant effects on human health. With the growing interest in the use of valuable dietary phytochemicals, rice bran has been intensively studied for its biologically active components. Our study investigated the relationship between carotenoid accumulation and expression of carotenoid biosynthetic gene during the developmental stages of seed maturation in rice cultivars varying in their bran color. Transcription levels of the key regulatory genes viz., psy pds lcy and ß ch were higher in rice grain containing colored bran indicating that carotogenesis is an ongoing process in mature bran. The highest level of expression and subsequent carotenoid accumulation was noted in the purple cultivar having 44.30 µg/gm of beta carotene, 25.07 µg/gm of zeaxanthine and 2.304 µg/gm of lutein. With the transition from the milking to the mature stage of grain filling in the purple cultivar, the change from ß, € carotenoid (α-car and lutein) accumulation to ß, ß carotenoid (ß-car, zea, etc) accumulation was observed. On the other hand the brown cultivars showed no detectable level of beta carotene, although 3.14 µg/gm of zeaxanthine and 6.72 µg/gm of lutein were noted. To further analyze the transcription patterns of carotenoid synthesis and metabolism, the bran layer from the purple and brown cultivars were removed. Noticeably, the purple variety showed reduced gene expression with the accumulation 0.1 µg/gm of ß carotene on the other hand, the brown cultivars showed non-detectable level of expression and carotenoid accumulation. Transcriptome profile generated by Ion torrent further gave a better insight into the underlying mechanism that affects enzyme synthesis/activity causing variation in the expression pattern and carotenoid content in the different developmental across the varieties. Thus, our study indicates the potential use of purple rice as a genetic source in rice breeding programs aimed to develop new varieties of rice that have a high content of provitamin A.

Speaker
Biography:

Arjun Chauhan has completed his Masters in Biotechnology and he is currently pursuing his PhD in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology from Dr. Yashwant Singh Parmar University of Horticulture and Forestry, Himachal Pradesh, India.

Abstract:

Genetic transformation studies in apple rootstock MM111 were carried out to standardize a protocol for Agrobacterium mediated chitinase gene transfer in apple. Antibiotics sensitivity, shoot regeneration experiments and time for Agrobacterium infection were carried out to study their effect on relative growth of explants and to obtain high frequency of callus induction/shoot regeneration. Leaf explants resulted in high frequency regeneration on MS medium supplemented with 0.8 mg/l TDZ and 0.5 or 1.0 mg/l NAA while only callus formation was achieved with other combinations. It was observed that callus induction decreased on increasing the concentration of hygromycin from 1-5 mg/l whereas all the explants died at 6 mg/l. 5 mg/l hygromycin was considered for selection of putative shoots. Agrobacterium tumefaciens LBA4404 strain harboring a chitinase (chi-11), hygromycin phosphotransferase (hpt) and phosphinothricin acetyltransferase (bar) genes obtained from Dr S Muthukrishnan, KSU, USA was used for transformation experiments. Minimum callus induction (5.11%) and maximum shoot regeneration (2.40%) was achieved with 25 minutes of infection. 500 mg/l cefotaxime was found the best to control Agrobacterium growth after four blots and its concentration can be reduced to 200-300 mg/l for further callus/shoot regeneration. Two and three days preculturing combined with 96 hours co-cultivation proved effective for getting putative shoots on selective medium containing 5 mg/l hygromycin and 500 mg/l cefotaxime.

Speaker
Biography:

Himanshi Kapoor has completed her MSc in Botany from the University of Delhi. She is currently a PhD Scholar in Professor Veena Agrawal’s Laboratory at the Department of Botany, University of Delhi. She is a CSIR-UGC SRF working on anti-cancerous medicinal plants. She has published one paper and attended one international conference and one national conference.

Abstract:

Glioblastoma is the primary cause of death due to brain tumors and there is an urgent need to find an alternative therapy using herbal extracts for it. Plant based medicines are a reliable source of drugs as they heal synergistically with minimum or no side effects. In the present investigation a strong bio-efficacy of Nardostachys jatamansi DC rhizome extract on human glioblastoma cell lines U87 MG and U373 MG has been seen. Bioassays conducted with methanolic extract of dried rhizomes after 24, 48 and 72 hours of the treatment revealed that the IC50 value as obtained through the absorbance versus dose plot of MTT assay was around 40 µg/mL. Drug 50 µg/mL was able to induce DNA fragmentation in the cells indicating apoptosis. The necrotic cells were differentiated from the apoptotic cells using Acridine orange and Ethidium bromide differential fluorescence staining which revealed that the key process of cell death was apoptosis and the dose as low as 20 µg/mL of the drug was able to induce early apoptosis, whereas higher doses exhibited complete apoptosis. The drug also exhibited a cell cycle arrest at G1/G0 phase at higher doses such as 60 µg per mL and 80 µg per mL as determined through flow cytometry. DAPI staining of the cells after drug treatment exhibited severe DNA damage at 60 µg/mL and 80 µg/mL concentrations along with excessive nucleation and mitotic catastrophe at even lower doses such as 20 µg per mL and 40 µg per mL. These studies have proved that the plant extract has a strong cytotoxic potential against Glioblstoma and the response was dose and time dependent. Incidentally, the extract was seen to be harmless to the normal cell line HEK. This is our first report proving strong anti-cancerous activity of the Nardostachys jatamansi rhizome extract.

Speaker
Biography:

Upasana Sharma is currently a PhD Scholar in Department of Botany, University of Delhi. She is a Postgraduate in Botany from University of Delhi, India. She has presented a poster in Indian Science Congress 2015 and she is currently working on the “Metabolic Engineering of Anticancerous Bioactive Compounds”.

Abstract:

Plumbago zeylanica commonly known as Chitrakmoolam is a perennial shrub used for the treatment against many disorders like dyspepsia, skin diseases, cancer and rheumatism. In present study HPLC evaluation of its major bioactive compound-plumbagin showed that, roots have maximum content (1.7 mg g-1 dry wt.) followed by stem and leaves. In order to enhance its content in vitro, hairy root cultures from leaf explants through Agrobacterium rhizogenes mediated transformation, were established with transformation efficiency of 46% and 33% on full and half strength MS medium, respectively. Eight hairy root lines R1, R3, R4, R5, R6, R7, R8 and R9 were established. Based on morphological patterns, these were grouped into four categories: Group-1 (R1, R3 and R8), Group-2 (R4, R6 and R7), Group-3 (R5) and Group-4 (R9). Group-1 was observed to have fewer lateral roots and less root hair. Group-2 and Group-3 roots comprise of fine hairs and frequent lateral branching. In group-3, roots initiated from calli, whereas in group-2, they emerged directly from root surface. Group-4 roots appeared dark, leathery with no visible root hairs and grew slowly. SEM analysis showed very fine and long root hairs on R4 surface; globular, short and long root hairs on R6, while other root lines showed both types of root hairs. Growth analysis revealed that R5 has maximum FGI (0.875) and DGI (0.864) whereas R3 has the least. HPLC analysis exhibited variable amounts of plumbagin in different root clones being maximum in R5 line [22 fold (2200 times) higher over in vitro root extract] followed by R3 and R8 thereby strongly advocating enhancement of plumbagin in hairy roots.

Speaker
Biography:

Ibemhal D Asem has published more than 8 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Advisory Committee Member of some other projects.

Abstract:

Curcuma caesia Roxb (Zingiberaceae), known as black turmeric in English, is a perennial herb with bluish-black rhizome found throughout the Himalayan region, North-East and Central India. The plant has been traditionally used in India for several medicinal purposes thus have a high economical importance. In the current scenario, there is a growing interest for the replacement of synthetic antioxidants or colorants by the natural products which have no harmful effect. The antioxidant properties of Curcuma caesia are effective in retarding the process of lipid peroxidation in oils and fatty foods and have been found out that the plant has antimutagenic properties which gained the interest of many research groups. But the plant has been recently characterized as endangered species due to the increasing demand and overexploitation without ensuring its regeneration. There is an increasing need to produce the plant to meet the human requirement, considering the need the present study was taken up to produce a large scale plantlets in a short duration of time. Therefore, an efficient and direct single medium based protocol for multiple shoot and root induction has been achieved from the rhizome explants of Curcuma caesia Roxb, when cultured on full strength MS media with different concentration of auxin (NAA) and cytokinins (BAP, KIN) with sucrose of 3%. Maximum number of shoots and maximum number of roots were induced in the medium, MS+5 mg/l BAP+ 2.5 mg/l KIN+2.0 mg/l NAA with cent percent regeneration. The regenerated plantlets were acclimatized and established on the soil with 95% of success. Thus, the current study would improve and standardize rapid and efficient in vitro techniques for clonal propagation using rhizome explants

Speaker
Biography:

Prateek Jain has completed his Masters of Science in Plant Biotechnology from Banaras Hindu University in year 2012. He is currently working as PhD student since 2012 under the guidance of Dr. Vikas Rishi. He has qualified GATE Exam in Life Science (2011), DBT-JRF (2012), CSIR-NET (2012), ARS-NET (2012) and CSIR-UGC-JRF (2013). He has already presented posters in two international conferences (7th International conference on Plant Biotechnology, Molecular Medicine & Human Health and Indraprastha International Conference on Biotechnology-2013).

Abstract:

The B-ZIP motif is a long bipartite α-helix. The C-terminal half is responsible for dimerization whereas N-terminal binds to sequence-specific DNA. The N-terminal basic region is unstructured in the absence of DNA but forms an alpha-helix when bound to DNA. We have replaced the basic N-terminal domain with a rationally designed acidic extension. Dimerization specificity of BZIP10, BZIP25 and BZIP53 with each other and with our designed dominant negative A-ZIP53 and its mutants was evaluated using biochemical and biophysical assays. The acidic extension act as a DNA template and extends the alpha-helical coiled coil to N-terminal. This acidic extension heterodimerize with wild type basic region and inhibit the DNA binding activities of wild type proteins. Circular dichroism results indicate that heterodimer of designed acidic leucine zipper and basic leucine zipper is more stable than homodimer of wild type B-ZIPs. Gel shift experiments showed the inhibition of wild type BZIP53, BZIP25 and BZIP10 by A-ZIP53 in equimolar concentrations. Transient transfections studies using Arabidopsis protoplast proved the in vivo efficacies of these dominant negative proteins. Unlike siRNA and other knockout technology our designed dominant negative heterodimerizes with all the memebers of same B-ZIP families thus overcoming the problem of biological redundancy.

Speaker
Biography:

Jatin Kumar is currently a PhD Research Scholar working under the supervision of Professor Veena Agrawal in the Department of Botany, University of Delhi. His current research work focuses on identification of sex linked molecular markers and genetic diversity analysis in dioecious plants. He has five research publications in peer reviewed international journals.

Abstract:

Simmondsia chinensis (Jojoba), an economically important dioecious crop cultivated commercially for its seeds which contain oil (jojoba wax). This is a male biased crop mainly vegetatively propagated, as identification of sex of the seed raised plants is not possible prior flowering. Therefore, identification of female and male plants before flowering stage has been reckoned as a challenging problem in this crop. DNA fingerprinting studies were carried out on physiologically matured male and female Jojoba plants in order to develop sex linked markers. Three ISSR primers UBC-807, ISSR848 and VIS11 generated male sex specific bands of ~1200bp, ~1500 bp and ~1300 bp, respectively which were present in all the male genotypes only. UBC-8071200 and VIS111300 have been cloned, sequenced and successfully converted into sequence tagged sites (STS) markers which amplified bands of ~800 bp and ~584 bp respectively specific to males. One SRAP primer combination E10/M9 amplified a band of 400 bp specific to males. RAPD primer OPG-5 produced a 1,400 bp fragment specific to males. Assessment of the levels and patterns of genetic diversity is also very helpful for improvement of vegetatively cultivated crops. 15 SCoT and 17 CBDP markers were employed and found CBDP markers to more effective than SCoT marker in terms of percentage polymorphism, polymorphic information content (PIC) value and marker index (MI). Among females, genotype MS F was highly diverse and Q104 F and 82-18 F were least and among males, 32 M and MS M were most diverse while 58-5 M the least diverse.

Speaker
Biography:

Meenakshi Chaudhary is currently pursuing her PhD from Department of Microbiology; Lady Hardinge Medical College affiliated with University of Delhi under the supervision of Dr. V. S. Randhawa.

Abstract:

Introduction: Enteric fever is endemic to India and has a high morbidity and mortality rate. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi is the most common serotype responsible for enteric fever in India. The present study was carried out to identify, characterize phenotypically S. enterica serovar Typhi strains and to standardize, evaluate and apply PFGE as a genotypic typing tool. Material & Methods: Two hundred and five strains has received at the National Salmonella Phage Typing Centre, LHMC, New Delhi were included in this study. All isolates were subjected to serotyping, biotyping, phage typing and then to antimicrobial susceptibility testing by CLSI disk diffusion (CLSI) technique to Ciprofloxacin, Cefotaxime, Ampicillin, Chloramphenicol, Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole and Tetracycline. Subsequently, MIC of the isolates was determined by E-test. Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (CHEF DR-III Bio-Rad) was performed using Pulsnet protocol from CDC, USA. Results were analyzed using Gel Compare II software (Applied Maths). Results: In the north zone, 28 different PFGE profiles were obtained which were grouped in to 6 different groups. In the central region, 28 different profiles were obtained which were grouped in 4 different groups. In the south region, 35 different profiles were obtained which belonged to 10 different groups. Conclusion: PFGE represents a good typing tool depicting more type ability than Phage Typing and should be used to see molecular heterogeneity amongst S. Typhi strains.

  • Track 3: Food and Bioprocess Technology Track 11: Aquaculture and Marine Biotechnology Track 12: Current Scenario of Biotechnology
Location: Hall-2

Chair

B K Malik

Sharda University, India

Speaker

Co-Chair

Shiv Kant Shukla

Biotech Consortium India Limited (BCIL), India

Session Introduction

Shiv Kant Shukla

Biotech Consortium India Limited (BCIL), India

Title: An overview on status of biotechnology parks in India

Time : 09:00-09:20

Speaker
Biography:

Shiv Kant Shukla has more than 15 years of diversified experience in the area of commercial biotechnology. He has done his Master’s degree and Doctorate’s degree in Biotechnology. He has earlier worked as In-charge of leading commercial plant tissue culture unit of central India. Currently he is working as an Assistant General Manager in Biotech Consortium India Limited (BCIL), an organization promoted by DBT, Government of India. At BCIL, he has been managing projects of national importance such as National Certification System for Tissue Culture Plants (NCS-TCP), Biotech Parks/Incubators, Entrepreneurship Development Program in Biotechnology etc.

Abstract:

Biotechnology Park is a demarcated area where laboratory space, ready to use facilities, pilot plant facilities, enterprise zone and all the other basic facilities are created to assist entrepreneurs in nurturing their life science ideas/discoveries and transform it into commercial value without risking huge investments. Facilities created in Biotech Park are leased out to entrepreneurs at economical rate to incubate their technology and scale-up to commercial level. Currently there are more than 15 Biotechnology Parks successfully operational in various States while many other upcoming parks are at the stage of detailed survey and basic ground work for their establishment. Department of Biotechnology (DBT), Government of India along with the State Government and research institution is playing a key role in setting up and operationalization of Biotech Parks. Biotech Consortium India Limited (BCIL) has been actively involved in preparing the detailed project reports (DPRs) for setting up of biotechnology parks in the country. BCIL has prepared DPRs for 20 different biotechnology parks and has been playing key role in their establishment. DPR broadly covers business model and facilities orienting towards identified priority areas for biotechnology intervention in the State. Biotech Parks are expected to become self-sustaining and to contribute in socio-economic development of the Region/State. An overview of status of operationalization of Biotechnology Parks in India and their role in promoting entrepreneurship will be discussed in the present study.

Speaker
Biography:

K Sunil Kumar is currently pursuing her Quality Standards for Planting Material in Oil Palm Nursery Research, India . He has published three papers in different national conferences

Abstract:

Oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq), the highest oil yielding crop accounted for 34.7% of world production of vegetable oils from an area of 4.8% of the total area cultivated with oil seeds. With the increase in area of the crop under diverse environments, it has become essential to develop oil palm varieties with high yield, compactness/dwarfness, high oil extraction ratio and tolerance to low moisture regimes. Evaluation and characterization of diversity in the available germplasm is essential for both utilization as well as maintenance of the traits of interest. Compared to conventional/morphological characterization, molecular methods of diversity estimation are fast and reliable. Molecular markers have the uniqueness that they are not influenced by the environment and the potential to reduce time needed for breeding new crop varieties. Also, problems of germplasm management arise as to the availability of land to ensure that we conserve as much as possible, the total genetic diversity of the species without duplication. In this context, the present study was taken up to estimate genetic variability and relationship of different accessions available at Palode using SSR markers. Thirty one genotypes including 29 germplasm accessions and two reference genotypes have been evaluated for the extent of diversity and relatedness. Among the 9 primer pairs used for SSR analysis, mEgCIR3399 gave the highest number of alleles (17) and sMo00129 produced the lowest number (6) of alleles. Cluster analysis, based on UPGMA, was performed in order to realize the extent of similarity/dissimilarity between the oil palms. Based on the dendrogram, the germplasm accessions were divided into two main groups. Cluster I consisted of four genotypes belonging to Elaeis oleifera. The cluster two included the remaining accessions and had six sub-clusters. Diversity was confirmed through 2-D and 3-D PCA plots. The study revealed significant variability among the accessions studied as well as classified similar ones to same category. It has helped to identify unique ones for introgression into breeding lines for development of improved variety as well as widening the genetic base and helped to avoid similar ones.

Speaker
Biography:

Jayanthi M has completed her Under-graduation in Agriculture and her Post-graduation and PhD in Plant Biotechnology under the guidance of Professor M S Swaminathan from University of Madras. She has the experience of working in several institutes like the TBGRI, Trivandrum, IGFRI, Jhansi, CTCRI, Trivandrum, IIOPR, Andhra Pradesh on a wide range of crops like Rauvolfia species, Tylophora indica, Rhododendrons, medicinal plants, oil palm, tuber crops and grasses. She is currently working with ornamentals like Tuberose, Gerbera and Carnation. She has published more than 25 research papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Tuberose (Polianthes tuberosa) is an ornamental bulbous plant and one of the very important cut flowers in India. Among the commercially grown flowers in India, tuberose occupies a prime position owing to its popularity as a cut flower, loose flower for perfumery as well as a potential source of secondary metabolites. Though it is a very popular flower not much genomic information is available on tuberose. To initiate any gene expression studies in this crop we need to make use of the very popular RT-qPCR methods which has been widely used to analyze expression of candidate genes. The accuracy and reliability of the results using RT-qPCR methods requires the use of stable housekeeping genes as control. In this study we describe the first systematic evaluation of eight candidate reference genes viz., 18S ribosomal RNA (18SrRNA), Ribulose bisphosphate (RuBP), Glyceraldehyde 3 phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), Actin, Coatomer subunit delta (CSD), Peptidylprolylisomerase (PPI), Serine/threonine protein phosphatase, (STPP) and ATP subunit (ATP SE). The transcript abundance of these genes was analysed in eleven different tissues of tuberose plant viz., young leaf, leaf sheath, root, immature flower bud, mature flower bud, open flower, stamen, ovary, stigma, petals and flower tube. Phylogenetic analysis of these sequences revealed high degree of similarity with other monocotyledonous plants which is discussed in this paper.

Suprava Patel

All India Institute of Medical Sciences Raipur, India

Title: Nanostructures: Challenges and future perspectives

Time : 10:00-10:20

Speaker
Biography:

Suprava Patel has completed her MD, Biochemistry from Utkal University, Odisha and currently working as Assistant Professor, Department of Biochemistry, AIIMS, Raipur, Chhattisgarh. Besides teaching and clinical laboratory management, she has actively participated in research projects on infertility, breast cancer and sickle cell disease. She has published papers in national and international scientific journals. She is working as Co-associate in Stem Cell Project in Pt. J. N. Medical College, Raipur and has made lots of efforts in isolation of stem cells. She has worked in diagnostic karyotyping unit. She has also been appointed as thesis co-guide to MSc Medical Biotechnology students. She has been actively involved in organizing many national and international conferences, symposiums and workshops. She is the member of many scientific associations.

Abstract:

In this era of nanoscience, advances of nanotechnology have led to the creation of new generations of nanostructures, each characterized by their explorative utilization in various types of applications in biomedicine and bio-engineering. These applications are expected to significantly improve the diagnosis and therapeutic aspects of many diseases. The materials have been explored and reported as components of biosensors and as very efficient drug delivery platform. Though, few nano-materials have been reported to be used in clinical medicine but not coherently effective. This could be because of nano-toxicity which is a potential limitation for its use in biological system. A brief description on the development of nanostructure for biomedical application over the years in terms of new materials and understanding of their interaction with the body may lead to better biocompatible nanostructures.

Manoj Kumar Sharma

Dr. S.R. Rajasthan Ayurved University

Title: Personalized medicine vs. ayurveda: A critical review

Time : 10:20-10:40

Speaker
Biography:

Manoj Kumar Sharma is an Ayurvedic academician and renowned name in the field of Basic Principles of Ayurveda. He has contributed knowledge towards the public welfare especially Ayurveda cosmetics. He has completed his M.D. in 1991 from the prestigious Ayurveda Institute – National Institute of Ayurveda & completed his Ph.D. in 2012, completed H.P.A.Ed. One year course from the prestigious Ayurved University- Dr. S. R.Rajasthan Ayurved University Jodhpur-India which is the second independent Ayurveda University after the Gujarat Ayurveda University, Jamnagar. At present he is the Associate Professor and HoD of the Deptt of Maulik Sidhanta (Basic Principle of Ayurveda) at the Dr. S.R.Rajasthan Ayurveda University, Jodhpur-India. He has been visited U S A and Hong Kong for the propagation of Ayurveda. Moreover, he has published 2 books, Articles 19 and more than 15 papers in reputed journals and serving as an editorial board member of the “Journal of Homeopathy and Ayurvedic Medicine”.

Abstract:

Ayurveda is a natural health care system that originated in India more than 5000 years ago. It emphasizes the treatment of disease in highly individualized manner as it believes that every individual is unique having different constitution. The concept of personalized medicine has been emerged as long as people have been practicing medicine. From Charaka to Hippocrates, all have practiced the personalized approach for treating a disease. According to Modern Science, humans are 99.9% identical. The genetic variation due to single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) is most common between different human beings. The phenotypic differences arise due to SNP and it contributes 0.1% of the differences. Ayurveda is basically pragmatic, systemic and holistic whereas biomedical sciences are theory-based, structural and reductionist. Biomedical science uses Aristotelian logic and reductionist scientific methodology to guide its propositions governs its medical theories whereas Ayurveda uses the Indian schemes of logic enshrined in the nyaya and vaishiseka schools, tridosha siddhant and dravya guna shastra to guide its medical theory. If personalized medicine is to be realized a systematic classification of human population is necessary but modern medicine classifies human population based on ethnicity. Geographic patterns of genetic variation show that inter-individual variation in drug response is common. This gap could be effectively filled by Ayurveda and its vision as Ayurvedic classification is independent of racial, ethnic or geographical considerations and may provide appropriate means of classifying phenotypes to be considered collectively for genotyping. Ayurvedic system of medicine and other traditional systems of medicine have a personalized approach in treating a patient with centuries of practice, rightly called experiential science. Ayurgenomics is the integration of the principles of Ayurveda with genomics. The primary challenge of Ayurgenomics is to establish the correlation between DNA and ‘Prakriti’. Ayurveda not only offers personalized treatment but personalized nutrition and personalized lifestyle by way of both drug and non drug modalities suited to an individuals prakriti making it a holistic science. These attributes of Ayurveda can play a major role in disease prevention and promotion of health towards longevity with a better quality of life which forms the basis of personalized medicine.

Speaker
Biography:

Sunita Singh has completed her PhD from Department of Atomic Energy, Mumbai University. She is currently working as an Associate Professor at the School of Biotechnology and Bioinformatics, D Y Patil University. She has also worked as an Associate Faculty, BSc (Biomedical Sciences and Molecular Biology), University of Central Lancashire, United Kingdom. She is a member of various national and international organizations. She has published over 14 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

Abstract:

Correlation of micro-heterogenicity of ribosomal repeats with restriction profiling targeting conserved mismatches is a more efficacious and cost-effective approach to identify microbes. An attempt to peruse restriction profiling of 23S ribosomal assemblage was ventured for detecting E. coli from its colony morphovars and to establish the clonal nature of the same. MSA of ribosomal repeats from 57 E. coli genomes (NCBI) followed by virtual restriction profiling of each ribosomal gene abetted in selecting two regions within 23S rDNA to achieve the objective. Amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis of 23S P1880 with Bfa I discriminated E. coli from other members in gamma-enterobacteriaceae family, whereas Hae III digestion of 23SP2682 amplicons assisted in establishing distinct clonal groups of E. coli. Four distinct Hae III profiles were observed with varying degree of predominance. K-12 and its descendants showed type-1 pattern whereas E. coli-B and its descendants exhibited type-4. A near pristine association between phylogroups and Hae III profiles with presumable correlation between the clonal groups and different pathovars were established. The generic nature, conservation and barcode gap of 23S rRNA gene makes it as an ideal choice and substitute to 16S rRNA gene, the most preferred region for molecular diagnostics in bacteria.

Speaker
Biography:

Durgesh Mukharya has been practicing IP law for last 8 years. He is a Registered Patent Agent having a Master’s in Biotechnology and he is also a Lawyer. Being in one of the top IP firms in India, he has handled patent drafting and prosecution in the areas of biotechnology, microbiology, bio-informatics, bio-pharmaceuticals, genetic engineering, medical diagnostics, therapeutics and biochemistry. He also advises clients on contentious issues related to patentability, freedom to operate, duediligence and technology landscape besides managing patent portfolios and conducting patent workshops. He regularly appears before the Indian Patent Office and the Intellectual PropertyAppellate Board in connection with prosecution of patent applications and related matters. He is also a regular speaker at various conferences and seminars.

Abstract:

As the pharmaceutical industry becomes more focused towards biopharmaceuticals and personalized medicines, biotechnology is increasingly playing an important role in coming up with newer and more innovative solutions to problems associated with human health. This approach is ably supported and encouraged by intellectual property, particularly patents which seek to protect commercial interests while ensuring reward for innovation. However, in the volatile landscape of patent laws, new precedents and interpretation of statutes give rise to complex scenarios thereby making it imperative to understand the nitty-gritties of patent laws. The important aspect is to recognize patent eligible subject matter in various jurisdictions and to comprehend as to what cannot be protected through patents. These issues are more pronounced and important in US than ever before, particularly in view of the recent spree of landmark judgments such as Myriad and Prometheus from the Supreme Court of the US. On the other hand, as India continues to evolve in its patent practice, it finds itself amidst difficulties in dealing with provisions of The Patents Act intertwined with The Biodiversity Act. Hence, it is important to know the scope of statutes and provisions in US and India in more detail, which forms a basis on; what is protectable versus what is not in the biotech sector. Thus, due awareness of patent laws is of criticality since the stakes are high and the overall impact of patents on biotechnology especially R&D is tremendous.

Speaker
Biography:

Megha Kadam Bedekar is working as Senior Scientist in Aquatic Animal Health and Management division of ICAR, Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Deemed University located in Mumbai. She is working on developing vaccines against fish pathogens and also on characterizing the immune pathways of fish and shellfish. She is basically a Veterinary graduate, PhD in Animal Biotechnology from Indian Institute of Veterinary Research, India. She is also working as an Editor and Reviewer for many journals.

Abstract:

Edwardsiella tarda is an important pathogen of fish globally. This pathogen is also important from a public health point of view, as this is known to produce disease in reptiles, birds, humans and other mammals. In spite of these facts, there is no established successful commercial treatment or preventive measure available. Labeo rohita which is not just an Indian major carp but is also an important part of Indian economy is one of the sufferers of Edwardsiellosis. There is a heavy quality loss in L. rohita because of this bacterial infection. Our laboratory is working on developing a DNA based vaccine against this pathogen. With this aim in present study we compared vaccine potential of two important antigens of Edwardsiella tarda as DNA construct in L. rohita fingerlings. L. rohita fingerlings were DNA immunized with recombinant glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH) and Outer Membrane Protein (OMP-S) genes of E. tarda. PCR primers were designed for both the gene using NCBI GenBank sequences. Amplified genes were cloned in eukaryotic expression vector pIRES 6.5 and purified. Two different groups of L. rohita fingerlings were immunized with 10 µg of respective DNA construct followed by booster at 14 day post vaccination. At 35th day, both the groups were challenged pathogenic E. tarda culture available in our laboratory. Relative percentage survivability, antibody titre, cell mediated immune response and immune gene expression analysis was done. We recorded that RPS was significantly higher in GAPDH group (73%) compared to OMP-S group (62 %). Competitive ELISA test indicated higher antibody titre in OMP-S group than GAPDH group. However nonspecific indicators NBT and phagocytic assay were significantly higher in GAPDH group. iNOS, Ilβ1 and IFNγ gene which are key regulators of immune mechanism were significantly up regulated in GAPDH group compared to OMP-S group. Our study suggested that GAPDH gene can be an ideal candidate for DNA immunization against E. tarda in L. rohita. But the antibody response generated is higher if we use OMP-S.

Speaker
Biography:

Priti Malhotra is an Associate Professor in Department of Chemistry in Daulta Ram College affiliated to Delhi University. She is actively engaged in Teaching and Research and has published many international research papers. She has authored books and successfully completed many research projects. She has also organized various workshops and skill development programs and has actively pursued Star College Project sponsored by Department of Biotechnology, Government of India.

Abstract:

In the recent past, iron nanoparticles (FeNp) have been largely explored by researchers due to their wide range of applications in various fields. Owing to the high intrinsic reactivity of FeNp on their surface sites their catalytic potential is highly remarkable. A simple green mechanism has been employed for the synthesis of FeNp which is plant mediated and also cost effective. Previously FeNp were synthesized using sodium borohydride as a reducing agent which part from being costly was damaging the environment. Therefore, a green alternative method using plant abstracts was carried out to synthesize FeNp. The green methodology proved to be of great significance because of its non-toxic, bio-degradable and cost effective nature. The green extracts also act as dispersing and capping agents which lead to the synthesis of stable FeNp as they hamper the agglomeration and oxidation of zero valent FeNp. In comparison to the microorganisms, which are also used for the preparation of nanoparticles, the utilization of green extracts involves a simple procedure and is relatively reproducible. The size and reactivity of the synthesis of FeNps are majorly governed by factors including the nature of the reducing and capping agent i.e., the green extract. Beta vulgaris (Beet) is a plant whose root is a vegetable and is known as beet root and its extract acts as an excellent reducing agent due to its high sugar content. Thus beet root extract has been used to produce FeNp which have been characterized by FTIR and UV-visible spectral analysis.

Sullip Kumar Majhi

National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources, India

Title: Development of surrogate broodstock for natural fishery resources management

Time : 12:30-12:50

Speaker
Biography:

Sullip Kumar Majhi has completed his PhD in Reproductive Biotechnology from Tokyo University of Marine Science & Technology, Japan and Postdoctoral (JSPS) study on stem cell research from Tokyo University. He is currently working as the Senior Scientist in the Molecular Biology & Biotechnology division of ICAR-National Bureau on Fish Genetic Resources, Lucknow. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of 3 journals.

Abstract:

Surrogate broodstock development by stem cell transplantation is a powerful reproductive biotechnology for the conservation and propagation of fish genetic resources. In recent time, the technique has gained much attention due to the enormous potential for application in reproductive medicine and stem cell therapy. Currently, the field application of stem cell transplantation in teleost has been broadly restricted to propagation of commercially important fish species such as production of Bluefin tuna through Mackerel recipient. Nevertheless, stem cell transplantation technique has also application beyond this and could play a pivotal role in fishery resources management in open water bodies such as lake, reservoir, etc. Recent reports have revealed that, invasive fish species in lake and reservoir have caused potential damage to the ecosystem resulting into decline in native fish population. One of the classical examples is entry of African catfish Clarias garipinus and Channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus to Asian water bodies. The impact has been such that, some of the valuable native fish species of the region are on the verge of extinction. It is also true that, such invasive fish species are extremely difficult to control in large size water bodies. In this scenario, turning the invasive fish species into surrogate parents could be a viable alternative to arrest the proliferation of such fish population.

Speaker
Biography:

Vindhya Mohindra has completed her M.Sc. (Genetics), Ph.D. (Genetics) in National Bureau of Fish Genetic Resources (Indian Council of Agricultural Research).She has been published five papers in different national conferences and one book published.

Abstract:

Under the present climate change scenario, aquatic hypoxia has become a global issue and it is pertinent to understand mechanisms that fish use in order to survive under hypoxic conditions. A growing number of genes had been reported in aquatic animals, in response to change in oxygen tension. Cysteine protease inhibitors (Cystatins) are among the genes responsible for reversible inhibition of cysteine proteases involved in many biochemical processes and immune response as well as in providing resistance to various bacterial and viral infections. In this study, two novel transcripts obtained from hypoxia tolerant Indian catfish, Clarias magur in response to hypoxia were characterized. Integrated genomic approaches, expression profiling and bioinformatics predictions showed that these transcripts belong to Cystatin superfamily and had putative cystatin/monelin like domains and might be among the novel class of proteases inhibitors (cystatin-like) and were designated as CbCystatin and CbCystatin2. Phylogentically, these were found to be clustered into family 2 cystatins clade. At transcriptional level, both the novel genes were ubiquitously expressed under normoxic conditions with highest level of expression in liver and head kidney tissues of C. magur while in response to short as well as long periods of hypoxia, their expression was significantly up-regulated in liver, spleen and “head” kidney tissues. These results suggested that the expression of both the novel Cystatin-like genes were greatly influenced by hypoxia in C. magur and are potentially involved in immunogenic as well as in other physiological processes that may provide adaptive significance under hypoxia in this fish.

Speaker
Biography:

Priyanka Singh has been currently working as an Assistant Professor in Department of Bioscience and Biotechnology, Banasthali University, India. She has been awarded Gold Medal for MTech degree (2008) from School of Biochemical Engineering, BHU. She has completed PhD from same department under supervision of Professor R. M. Banik in 2015. She has been awarded with renowned JRF (P)-Fellowship from DST-INSPIRE to pursue her PhD program. She has 9 research papers published in reputed journals to her credit. She has also presented papers in national and international conference and reviewed many papers as Reviewer of international reputed journals

Abstract:

Microbial glutaminase has many biotechnological applications in food and pharmaceutical industry. Enzyme deactivation is one of the major constraints in the development of biotechnological processes. This paper describes the study of thermal inactivation of purified L-glutaminase from Bacillus cereus MTCC 1305 at temperature ranging from 35-60˚ C in term of deactivation energy (Ed), enthalpy (ΔH), entropy (ΔS) and free energy (ΔG). The thermostability curve showed stability of this enzyme up to 50˚ C with approximately 50% of activity remaining after incubation for 30 minute. The higher value of energy of deactivation (Ed=152.1038 KJ/K) and enthalpy (ΔH≈149 KJ mol-1) indicates that more energy is required for thermal denaturation of this enzyme. The process of deactivation of L-glutaminase was found to be thermodynamically non spontaneous reaction with positive value of free energy. This enzyme showed more ordered state at all these temperatures with negative value of Entropy (ΔS). Half-life (t1/2) of deactivation was found to be decreased with increase of temperature indicating higher degree of thermal inactivation process. These all thermodynamic parameters showed stability of this enzyme up to 50˚ C with half-life deactivation (t1/2=34.478 minutes). The information of thermal characteristics of this enzyme could be a good candidate for industrial applications.

Speaker
Biography:

Piyush Parkhey has completed his PhD in 2015 from the Department of Biotechnology at National Institute of Technology, Raipur. He has received the prestigious INSPIRE-AORC Fellowship in the year 2010 from Department of Science and Technology, Government of India. His PhD title was “Biological production of Hydrogen: Development of a two-step bioprocess for conversion of rice straw into hydrogen”. During the course of his PhD, he has published 5 research papers and presented his work in 3 international conferences. He has also filed a provisional patent in 2014 titled “A Continuous Microbial electrolytic cell reactor (CMECR) for biohydrogen production using lignocellulosic hydrolysate by electrohydrogenesis”.

Abstract:

A single chambered Microbial Electrolytic Cell Reactor (MECR) of working volume 2 L was designed using acrylic plastic sheets for hydrogen production by electrohydrogenesis. Initially, Lysinibacillus sphaericus, an aerobic cellulolytic bacterium was isolated from dairy wastewater and its cellulolytic potential was characterized. The isolate produced 5.16±0.07 U/ml CMCase. Rice straw was procured from rice fields and pretreated with microwave assisted alkali pretreatment method. Cellulose recovery was calculated to be 82.08±0.3%. Cellulase preparation was used to hydrolyze the pretreated rice straw. A percent saccharification of 69.5% was observed. HPLC analysis revealed that hydrolysate produced at optimal conditions of saccharification constituted 70.8% of glucose. The hydrolysate thus obtained was used as feed in the designed MECR for hydrogen production by the process of electrohydrogenesis. Graphite sheet were used as anode and a stainless-steel mesh was used as cathode in the reactor. Shewanella putrefaciens (MTCC 3525) was used as exoelectrogen to oxidize rice straw hydrolysate in the reactor for electrohydrogenesis. The maximum H2 yield of 695 ml H2 g-1 COD removal with an energy efficiency of 65% was recorded.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

Speaker
Biography:

Deepak Mohan Kapse has completed his MSc in Organic Chemistry from University of Mumbai. Recently he has completed MPhil in Nanoscience and Nanotechnology from National Center for Nano-science and Nanotechnology, University of Mumbai. Currently he is taken enrolled for PhD in Nanosciences and Nanotechnology under the guidance of Dr. H. Muthurajan. He has recently published one paper in Journal of Material Sciences and Surface Engineering. He has also presented two papers in national conference as well as two papers in international conferences.

Abstract:

Nanocubes have extensively used for their various application in building nano-devices, nano-sensors and functional nano-material. Basically these alkali metal niobate shows great deal of attention as a future functional material because of their excellent piezoelectric, ferroelectric, electro-optic, non-linear optical properties. Sodium potassium niobate (Na0.5K0.5NbO3) is an excellent lead free piezo material; however its antimicrobial potential is yet to be explored. With this in view the present work, studies its antimicrobial effects against four test organisms, two bacterial species, Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis and two fungal genera belonging to Aspergillus species and Candida albicans. The experiment involved the use of contact method in order to assess the antimicrobial effects of the material. Results indicated that the compound was effective against all the four types tested, though at a higher concentration and a longer duration of time of exposure. These results seem to be significant since this material finds potential use in biomedical devices.

Pooja Jaiswal

University of Mumbai, India

Title: Morphological dependence of ZnO nanostructures on antibacterial activity

Time : 14:50-15:05

Speaker
Biography:

Pooja Jaiswal has completed her MSc in Life Science (Biological Macromolecules) and currently pursuing MPhil (Nanoscience and Nanotehnology) from NCNNUM, Mumbai University, India.

Abstract:

Morphological dependence of ZnO nanostructures on antibacterial activity: ZnO nanostructures with different morphologies (dumbbell, needles, petals, etc) were synthesized using chemical bath deposition (CBD) technique by varying the parameters like molar concentrations of Zn2+/OH- and the pH value of the solution. Synthesized ZnO nanostructures were characterized structurally using XRD, SEM, TEM and optically using UV-spectrophotometer and Photoluminescence (PL) techniques. Morphological dependence of ZnO nanostructures on its antibacterial activity was studied using a gram negative bacterium Escherichia coli as a model microorganism. The antibacterial activity of ZnO nanoparticles was tested by spread plate method and the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined. The antibacterial activity was found to depend strongly on the morphology of the nanostructures used. Unique nano sized petal shaped ZnO structures showed maximum antibacterial activity as compared to the other structures. The rupture/disruption of the bacterial cells after nanoparticle treatment was investigated by environmental SEM. The morphology-dependent antibacterial activity of ZnO observed in our case could be due to the higher surface-to-volume ratio of petal shape, specific surface area, surface modifications as well as defects associated with the nanostructures used.

Speaker
Biography:

Vrinda S has completed her PhD in Marine Biotechnology on the topic “Development of CHH family recombinant hormones and RNAi for induced maturation of Penaeus monodon” from Cochin University of Science and Technology, Kerala. She is a Dr. D S Kothari Postdoctoral Fellow pursuing her Postdoctoral studies at National Centre for Aquatic Animal Health, CUSAT on the topic entitled “Recombinant antimicrobial peptides and cell penetrating domains from Phylum Arthropod and Mollusc as anticancer agents”.

Abstract:

The inhibitory functions of Moult Inhibiting Hormone (MIH) have a pivotal role in growth and reproduction of Penaeus monodon. In this study we report the production of biologically active thioredoxin-fused mature MIH I protein (mf-PmMIH I) of P. monodon for the first time in a bacterial system and its use as an antigen to raise polyclonal anti-sera (anti-mf-PmMIH I). Using reverse transcription, the open reading frame (ORF) of 357 bp cDNA sequence of MIH I was isolated from the eyestalk of P. monodon cultured in the Indian brackish water rearing culture system. The mature MIH I gene of 231 bp that codes for 77 amino acids was cloned into the Escherichia coli thioredoxin gene fusion expression system. Upon induction 29.85 kDa mature MIH I fusion protein (mf-PmMIH I) was expressed, purified and refolded for use as exogenous MIH I and as an antigen to raise polyclonal antisera. The specificity and sensitivity of the raised polyclonal antisera against the mf-PmMIH I antigen was examined by Western blot, ELISA and immunofluorescence. The thioredoxin-fused mature MIH I protein and the polyclonal antisera developed were tested in adult P. monodon (n=20, 10-15 g) to determine their acute biological effects on augmentation and attenuation of molt cycle duration. In the shrimps injected with mf-PmMIH I, the molt cycle duration was significantly increased to 16.67±1.03 days while the anti-mf-PmMIH I exhibited a molt duration that was significantly reduced to 8.33±0.82 days. This innovative MIHI fusion protein appears to be practical in terms of effective molting.

Speaker
Biography:

Ramya R Nair has completed her MSc Biotechnology from Bharathiar University and currently doing Research on the topic “ Diversity and abundance of key microbial functional groups involved in nitrogen biogeochemical cycling of zero water exchange shrimp culture system through meta-genomic approach” at Cochin University of Science & Technology since May 2011 as part of her UGC-CSIR Scholarship program. She has participated in several national/international level conferences. She was awarded as “Young Marine Biologist” for her work. She is interested in Genomics, Proteomics & bioinformatics software.

Abstract:

Zero water exchange shrimp culture systems have emerged as the best option to address the demands of bio-security and environmental sustainability in the global aquaculture industry. In zero water exchange shrimp culture systems managed by the application of the indigenous Bacillus cereus sensu lato MCCB 101 (Genbank Acc. No. EF 062509) containing preparation ‘Detrodigest’ for the bioremediation of detritus, the environmental qualities were found to be stable throughout the culture period. Moreover, the ammonia, nitrite and nitrate were at negligible levels indicating the presence of stable and active nitrifying microbial communities. In present study, the diversity and community variation in bacterial and archaeal ammonia oxidizers in these systems were analyzed using amoA-the catalytic subunit of the functional gene ammonia mono oxygenese. The sediment samples were collected from three different culture ponds during different culture phases and the meta-genomic DNA were isolated. The bacterial and archaeal amoA genes were amplified from the meta-genome using specific primers, amoA gene libraries were constructed and selected positive clones were sequenced and analyzed. The phylogenetic analyses of bacterial amoA genes showed maximum similarity to that of uncultured Nitrosomonas species whereas the archaeal amoA genes showed similarity to that of Crenarchaeota. The diversity analyses of bacterial and archaeal amoA genes showed more diversity for archaeal amoA genes especially towards the end of culture. The ecological roles of bacteria and archaea in nitrogen biogeochemical cycling and bioremediation in these systems need to be further analyzed by their abundance in relation to substrate availability.

Rohini R Nair

Banaras Hindu University, India

Title: Role of spermidine on growth and development of seaweeds in vitro condition

Time : 15:35-15:50

Speaker
Biography:

Rohini Ravindran Nair has completed his PhD from Banaras Hindu University. She has received Marie-Curie CO-INVEST Fellowship. She is at present working as a Postdoctoral Fellow in San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Italy. She has published 14 papers in reputed journals and a book chapter.

Abstract:

The etiologies of first trimester loss are multifactorial and often remain unknown, certain risk factors increase the likelihood of pregnancy loss. To date there are many factors known to cause EPL but due to very heterogeneous condition of EPL or RPL, it still remains unresolved and unexplained. The identification of the underlying causes of pregnancy loss is important for developing more successful treatments for women experiencing RPL and thereby preventing subsequent pregnancy loss. A multitude of immunomodulatory properties of the fetal-maternal interface have evolved to allow the survival of the immunologically distinct fetus without an attack from the maternal immune system. To identify the contribution of inflammatory molecule we studied the level of S100A8 the inflammatory protein and MDSCs the cells regulating its expression in pregnancy loss patients. The contribution of S100A8 and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in patients suffering from early or recurrent miscarriage is unknown. S100A8 is a calcium binding proteins and is found at high levels in the extracellular milieu during inflammatory conditions. MDSC are implicated in modulation of T-cell response in healthy pregnancies: However, the role of MDSC in patients suffering from miscarriage has not been studied. S100A8 level was analyzed by real time PCR, Western Blotting and ELISA. MDSC level was assessed by flow Cytometry and Immunostaining in blood and endometrial decidua respectively. Activation of T-cells was determined by MTT proliferation and IL-2 ELISA assays. The miscarriage patients harbor increased level of S100A8 and reduced level of functionally suppressive MDSC in blood and endometrium as compared to healthy control women with successful pregnancies. These results suggest S100A8 and MDSC are inversely co-related. MDSC level regulates maternal tolerance in healthy pregnancies and that drug inducing MDSC could have therapeutic implication in the miscarriage patients.

  • Track-10: Environmental Biotechnology and sustainable development
Location: Hall-3
Speaker

Chair

Ram Lakhan Singh

Dr. RML Avadh University, India

Co-Chair

Nidhee Chaudhary

Amity Institute of Biotechnology, India

Speaker
Biography:

Anilkumar Gopinathan is a Senior Professor at the School of Biosciences and Technology, VIT University, India. He had his Postdoctoral Training in Invertebrate Molecular Endocrinology from the University of Oklahoma, USA as a DBT Overseas Associate. A two-time Grantee of Research Projects from the International Foundation for Science (IFS, Stockholm, Sweden). He is also currently the Scientific Advisor to the IFS. He had also been Visiting Scientist to the University of Gdansk (Poland), International Sakharov Environmental University (Minsk, Belarus) and the University of Oklahoma (under Indo-US DST-NSF program). He was awarded by St. Berchman’s Best Teacher, a Covetable State-Level Award. He has also chaired scientific sessions in several international conferences.

Abstract:

Non-peptide hormones (like steroids) rely on Nuclear Receptors (NRs) to activate the target gene to effect hormone action. To bind with the hormone (ligand), NR has ligand binding domain (LBD). The other domain which is functionally important is the DNA binding domain (DBD), a highly conserved domain, instrumental in binding with the target gene. Evidently, NRs are ubiquitous among metazoans in both vertebrates and invertebrates. The ecdysteroids act as hormones that promote growth in several invertebrates and are known to act through the NR, theecdysteroid receptor (EcR), encoded by the ecdysteroid receptor gene (EcR). EcR expression is found to fluctuate in a stage-dependant manner related to growth. Insects became the first model organism wherein the EcR was detected and the expression was studied. Subsequently, EcR was detected in other invertebrate groups as well. Crustaceans became the other major group wherein the EcR gene expression was studied. Interestingly, Carney and Bender (2000) have demonstrated that ecdysteroid receptor is a requisite for successful vitellogenesis in Drosophila. Since then, researchers have been trying to unravel the role of EcR in insect reproduction. Investigations have also led to the identification of retinoid receptors that dimerize with the EcR to accomplish the hormone action. These results have encouraged the carcinologists to hypothesize that a comparable situation might exist in crustaceans as well. Of late, the experiments performed on Drosophila and Tribolium have shown a putative receptor (the ‘Met’ receptor) for the terpenoid hormone (JH), analog of MF, the gonadotropic hormone in crustaceans. However, the exact mechanism of the cascade of events, beginning from the ecdysteroids, leading to vitellogenesis is yet to be understood. The present paper would discuss at length, the possibilities of these hormone receptors getting involved in growth and reproduction in invertebrates.

Speaker
Biography:

Iti Sharma is currently pursuing her PhD from Indian Institute of Technology Kharagpur, India. She is working in the field of Bio-energy. She has published one book chapter and attended one national and one international conference. Her primary research area is to treat lignocellulosic waste and simultaneously power production using microbial fuel cells.

Abstract:

The Microbial Fuel Cell (MFC) has advantages to generating power and wastewater treatment simultaneously. Microbial consortium, settle out as sludge catalyzes the reactions in Microbial Fuel Cells. Sludge collected from septic tank usually from domestic wastewater is used to inoculate bacteria in MFC. In sludge, usually 95% of the organisms are bacteria and 5% are higher organisms. Mixed bacterial population degrades the provided waste substrate for their nutrition along with to power MFC. However due to various chemical products used in daily life by human from morning till night causes lethal effects on bacterial metabolism by blocking fatty acid synthesis, glycolysis, peroxidase activity and the proton-translocating of bacterial membranes, etc. To obtain sustainable energy from waste, we have to save the bacterial population from the accumulation of these toxins in MFC. In domestic sludge, due to use of soaps, hand washes, dish-washing products, laundry detergents, plastics, toothpaste, mouthwashes, antiperspirants cosmetics, shaving creams, hair conditioners, impregnated sponges, surgical scrubs, pesticides like triclosan etc., the potent anti-microbial agent becomes the part of it. Use of disinfectants like chlorine in water also remains in the sludge and from stable toxic complexes with triclosan or other elements. As a result of various products such as toothpastes, tea, coffee, carbonated beverages and non-vegetarian food, fluoride remains in the inoculum sludge collected from domestic wastewater and causes toxicity to the bacterial population. Apart from above elements, there are various other harmful compounds unwittingly accompany microbial population while inoculation in MFC.

Speaker
Biography:

Rajeshwari is currently pursuing her PhD in the Department of Botany, University of Delhi, India. She is a Post graduate in Botany from Banaras Hindu University, Varanasi. She has presented a poster in Indian Science Congress, 2015 and currently working on heavy metal stress in Cassia angustifolia Vahl.

Abstract:

The presence of heavy metals in the environment is one of the major concerns because of their bio-accumulating tendency and toxicity. In this study, Cassia angustifolia Vahl was grown on Knop’s basal medium supplemented with various concentrations (0, 1, 10, 50, 100, 200 mg L−1) of heavy metals (ZnSO4 and CuSO4) to understand the anti-oxidative enzymes, metal accumulation and DNA damage at cellular level. Average root and shoot length decreased with increasing metal concentration. Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy revealed that maximum accumulation of metal was 643.62 mg kg-1 and 1634.23 mg kg-1 in shoots, while in roots, it was 1682.49 mg kg-1 and 9516.99 mg kg-1 at 200 mg L-1 Zn and Cu treated seedlings, respectively. A significant increase in anti-oxidative enzymes SOD, CAT, APX, GPX and GR was observed under both metal treatments. MDA exhibited 2.5 and 3.33 fold increase and proline accumulation increased up to 9.42 and 11.20 fold over control at 200 mg L-1 Zn and Cu, respectively. SEM images showed that Zn and Cu both had an adverse effect on leaf ultra-structure above 10 mg L-1 Zn and Cu treatment. Trypan blue staining of leaves showed increased cell death at 200 mgL-1 Zn and Cu. HPLC analysis of sennosides revealed that maximum sennoside A content accounted for 175.19 mgg-1 FW at 1 mgL-1 Cu whereas sennoside B accounted for 30.0 mgg-1 FW at 100 mgL-1 Cu treatment. Comet assay showed extensive DNA damage above 10 mgL-1 Zn and Cu. SDS-PAGE analysis showed increased synthesis of low molecular weight proteins (20-14 kDa) at higher concentration of Zn and Cu. Our results suggest that C. angustifolia has high metal accumulating potential which can be utilized for phytoremediation process.

Speaker
Biography:

Sriharsha D V has completed his Masters in Microbiology from the Department of Microbiology and Biotechnology, Bangalore University in the year 2013. He is currently pursuing his PhD in the field of Environmental Microbiology from the same department.

Abstract:

Industrial effluent is a major environmental threat due to contaminant loads, especially of heavy metals. Removal of these heavy metals from the contaminated sites has been a never ending challenge as they are persistent in the environment and cause major health issues. In recent days, a biotechnological approach i.e., biosorption by microbes has gained importance over the conventional methods. Fungal organisms and agro waste materials have received increasing attention in recent days as a potential biosorbent. The cell wall components (cellulose, hemicelluloses, chitin or pectin) along with functional groups like hydroxyl, carboxyl and amino groups of these biosorbents serve as active metal binding sites. Six species of Aspergillus, Penicillium sp. and a Trichoderma sp., exhibited resistance to Barium up to 2000 mM by well diffusion method. A species of Penicillium and two species of Aspergillus showed resistance to Lead up to 2000 mM. An adsorbent was designed by growing Aspergillus or Penicillium sp., on a natural agro waste substance i.e., loofah sponge under shaken condition for 48 hours at 37º C in broth supplemented with nutrients. The adsorption of Barium and Lead on dried adsorbent (loofah disc with fungal mycelium) showed 95% and 99% respectively as shown by Atomic Adsorption Spectrophotometer (AAS) analysis. Adsorption capacity of the designed adsorbent was further confirmed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and X-rays Fluorescence (XRF) analysis.

Alexey Safonov

Russian Academy of Sciences, Russia

Title: Flow- through bioreactor for radioactive waste purification

Time : 10:05-10:20

Speaker
Biography:

A Safonov has completed his PhD in Ecology and he is a Senior Researcher, Head of Biotechnology and Radioecology group in Frumkin Institute of Physical Chemistry and Electrochemistry of Russian Academy of Science. His interests are: Microbiology of radioactive waste repositories, biogeochemistry and in situ bioremediation, bio-treatment of waste, radioecology, uranium mill tailing, bacterial fungal and algae abilities for metal sorption and reduce, flow-through bio-filters, bio-electrochemistry and biosensors, Tc chemistry, trans-uranium radionuclides and fission products and radio medicine.

Abstract:

Liquid radioactive wastes (LRW) are multi component systems consisting of various macro-components like nitrate, sulfate ions, extractants, solvents and detergents and as well of microcomponents-radionuclides (U, Cs, Sr, Tc) and metals Cr, Zn, Cu etc. The aim of this work is the use of bacteria for waste denitration and purification from radionuclides and toxic metals. Here we used the microorganisms separated from extreme habitats: Repositories of radioactive waste, alkaline lakes of Kulunda Steppe, (salinity up to 300 g/l and pH 9-11) and underground water, contaminated with nitrate and radionuclides. All of strains were able to reduce nitrate anions to molecular nitrogen and metals from high valence to low. We used radwaste models, based on the data of FSUE “RADON” analytical laboratory. The concentration of nitrates varied from 4 to 100 g/l, sulfates up to 2 g/l, bicarbonate HCO3 up to 10 g/l with pH 9-10. Laboratory designed bio-filters with different types of cultivation (in static and flow-through conditions) were used. During the cultivation in the flow-through bio-filter system the rate and degree of nitrate consumption has been significantly increased by formation of a surface bio-film on an inert carrier providing higher specific surface. Bacterial cells were able to immobilize radionuclides from the solution U (88-96%), Th (up to 90 %) Sr (50-60 %), Tc, Cs and toxic metals Cr, V, Mo, La, cause to purification of radioactive waste.

Speaker
Biography:

Premsunder Ghoshhas completed his PhD from National Institute of Technology, Durgapur and he is currently working as Principal Scientist at CSIR-CMERI, Durgapur. He is working in the field of biofuel and bioenergy. He has published more than 17 papers in reputed journals and has been associated with several national and international projects.

Abstract:

Water hyacinth (Eichhornia crassipies) is a noxious weed with tremendous high growing capacity. Owing to its high content of hemicellulose (30-55% of dry weight), it could be used up for xylose production, which in turn could be further converted to xylitol. Water Hyacinth biomass is available in abundance in certain parts of the world making it a suitable feedstock for distributed xylitol production. The present study entails the optimization of xylose yield by response surface methodology for pretreatment of water hyacinth biomass to maximize yield of xylose. Central composite rotatable design (CCRD) was applied to investigate and analyze the interaction effects of the four independent process variables soaking time, acid concentration, agitation speed and treatment time. Batch fermentation was carried out by supplementing the treated water hyacinth hydrolysate with the inoculums in a 500 mL Erlenmeyer flask in a incubator shaker at 30º C at 200 rev min-1 for a period of 72 hours at pH level of 5. Samples were taken out at regular intervals to determine the concentration of xylitol and remaining xylose. Batch fermentation of 64.82 g/l of sugars present in concentrated water hyacinth hemicellulose hydrolysate was performed using 10% (v/v) Pichia stipitis, which produced maximum xylitol concentration of 22.5g/l at 48 hours with yield of 0.45 g xylitol/g xylose.

  • Track-9: Bioinformatics and Biosensor Track-13: Tissue science and engineering
Location: Hall-3

Chair

S V Eswaran

UNESCO-DBT Regional Centre for Biotechnology, India

Speaker

Co-Chair

Yasha Hasija

Delhi Technological University, India

Session Introduction

S.V.Eswaran

UNESCO-DBT Regional Centre for Biotechnology, India

Title: Cataractogenesis: Can cataract be delayed or reversed?

Time : 11:20-11:40

Speaker
Biography:

Emeritus Scientist & Emeritus Professor-AcSIR Ph.D., 1973, University of Delhi, India. INSA teacher award, 2013 Nominated by Sri Venkateswara College, University of Delhi for a lifetime dedicated to undergraduate teaching as “Teacher of Eminence”, 2013 CRSI Best teacher award, 2007 University of Delhi distinguished teacher award, 2009; DADD-UGC fellow, 1976-77. Atomic Energy Commission Post-graduate Scholarship, 1967-68 Listed in IBC Outstanding Scientists Worldwide 2007 Nominated as International Scientist of the Year 2007 Included in Marquis Who’s Who in the World 2010; Included in 1999 Edn., of International Directory of Awarded the Distinguished Leadership, published by the American Biographical Institute. Member, Expert Committee, DBT Star Colleges Committee, 2011-2014. Appointed as a Local Commissioner by the High Court of Haryana and Punjab and Court in New Jersey in a patent case, 2011- Member, Board of Research Studies, Faculty of Science, University of Delhi, and Department Research Committee, Chemistry Department, University of Delhi 2008.

Abstract:

What triggers onset of cataract? The human eye lens contains water soluble, heat stable and fully transparent proteins. Oxidation, dehydration, formylation, fragmentation, misfolding, aggregation could make these proteins insoluble, making the lens cloudy, translucent and finally opaque. αA Crysatllin the most abundant protein in the eye lens and plays a critical role in cataractogenesis. It has a chaperoning role and holds a‘misfolded’ protein until it refolds to its original state. (“Holdase function”). 3-Hydroxyurenine (& possibly3-hydoxyanthranilic acid) oxidises αA Crystallin producing hydrogen peroxide in the eye and is implicated in cataractogenesis. Aquaporin 0 and calcium binding control opening/closing of the water channel, creating osmotic pressure, forcing water into the eye lens, leading to cataract. “Proteomic analysis of Age -Related Nuclear Cataracts and Normal Lens Nuclei” (ARNC) is associated with formation of high-molecular weight aggregates in ARNC lens nuclei. Crosslinking of wild type αA WT Crystallin and αA-G98R mutant has been compared using a homobifunctional crosslinker-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS, MS/MS) & bioinformatics. A single difference in subunit-subunit interaction sites has been detected between the αA-G98R mutant and the wild type, which leads to a conformational change, making the mutant protein more prone to aggregation. Studies on congenital cataract on two patients have shown that two mutations (W581R and G588S) in the highly conserved region for lanosterol synthase leads to increased aggregation of the mutant protein. Lanosterol delays and reverses such cataract in rabbits and dogs. Can this result be extended to man?

Speaker
Biography:

Debjani Roy has completed her PhD in Computational Biology from New York University, USA. She is currently an Assistant Professor at Biophysics Department, Bose Institute, Kolkata. Her research interests include computational systems biology, drug repositioning and structural bioinformatics. She has so far published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has presented her work in many national and international conferences.

Abstract:

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most prevalent neurodegenerative disease throughout the world. Most of the clinical symptoms of AD appear at a very later stage, therefore, the identification of disease markers is essential which can help proper detection of AD at an earlier stage and slow down its progression. Small non-coding RNAs, microRNAs (miRNAs), are modulators of gene expressions and play important roles in cellular processes. Recent studies implicate certain miRNAs in the pathogenesis of AD. Epigenetic markers such as DNA methylation and histone modification around promoter regions modify chromatin structure and regulate expression of downstream genes. Epigenetic studies have also revealed that miRNAs are directly regulated by DNA methylation and histone modification at their promoters as well. In this work, we have performed a genome wide study to reveal the distribution of AD related proteins (AD_R) and proteins previously not known to be associated with AD (AD_UR) from the human genome. We have constructed regulatory networks involving genes, transcription factors and miRNAs. Several network motifs namely feed forward loop (FFL), feed-back loop (FBL) and single input module (SIM) were studied from the regulatory networks. We have identified the epigenetic modification patterns of regulators of these network motifs. Our study also revealed the long non-coding RNA and other non-coding RNA mediated regulations in AD. AD biomarkers and epigenetic modifications identified in our study will provide insight into new AD therapeutic targets.

Yasha Hasija

Delhi Technological University, India

Title: ARDs: Connecting the dots

Time : 12:00-12:20

Speaker
Biography:

Yasha Hasija is currently working as an Assistant Professor in Department of Biotechnology, Delhi Technological University, India. She has published research papers in journals of high repute and has been awarded several prestigious national and international awards. She is the Project Investigator of sponsored research projects from SERB and CSIR. She is also serving as an Associate/Executive Editor and an Editorial Board Member of many international journals. She has served as an invited expert and has delivered invited technical and memorial talks at several prestigious universities. She is an active Researcher supervising BTech, MTech and PhD students at DTU. Her broad areas of research include genome informatics, genome annotation, microbial informatics, integration of genome-scale data for systems biology and personalized genomics.

Abstract:

Ageing is an inevitable process usually characterized with the rise of age-related disorders (ARDs) such as cardiovascular diseases, cancer, arthritis, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases and others. This greatest challenge faced by our ageing population arises due to the variation in the diseases incidence, prognosis, therapeutic response and toxicity which have been attributed to the complex interplay of genetic variability and environmental factors. Thus, understanding the etiology of ageing, ARDs and hence the investigation of the genetic markers responsible for variation in the individuals response to disease incidence, therapeutic response and lifestyle have been of paramount importance. With the advent in the field of genomics and computing, a lot of biological information on the genetic and environmental components of ageing and ARDs has been generated, however, the studies integrating diverse information to better off in our ability to treat and prevent age-related diseases are lacking. In this regard, we have made an attempt to address the biology of ageing and ARDs using an integrated computational approach. Using the manually curated information from our in-house databases on the genetic variants associated with ARDs (dbAARD), genetic variants modulating the drug response (dbPGX) and the polymorphisms interacting with diet (NutriGene); developing computational prediction tools (such as AGP) and network analysis approach, we have tried to connect the distinct spots in the space to form an informative pattern to solve the maze of human ageing and ARDs. We believe that by using holistic approach we can better understand the biology of ageing and ARDs and can achieve our rationale of personalized nutrition and medicine, thereby approaching near healthy ageing.

Speaker
Biography:

Abha Mishra got her PhD in Biochemical Engineering in 2001 from School of Biochemical Engg., IIT (BHU). She joined the same School as a faculty in the year 2003 after a short stay at JUIT Waknaghat, India as Faculty and In-charge of Bioinformatics Department in the year 2002. She has guided 2 PhD and 28 MTech students till date. She has published more than 50 articles in various international and national journals.

Abstract:

Medicinal plants containing active chemical constituents with high antioxidant property play an important role in the prevention of various infectious diseases and have potential health benefits. Some of the most important bioactive phytochemical constituents of medicinal plants like Curcuma longa, Ocimum sanctum and Musa sapientum were studied in this project because they are ubiquitous and abundantly grown. They could be a fairly economical therapeutic agent for wound management as a pro-healer, as an antioxidants and have antimicrobial properties. Curcumin from C. longa, Eugenol from O. sanctum were extracted by column chromatography using different solvents. These were purified in dichloromethane solvent which was verified by TLC and HPLC. Leucocyanidin was also isolated by TLC and HPLC from Musa sapientum. Characterization of Curcumin and Eugenol was done by NMR. The aqueous extract of C. longa did not show any antimicrobial activity while ethanolic extract exhibited inhibition. Aqueous extract of O. sanctum also showed negligible zone of inhibition in case of bacterial growth while showed inhibition in fungal growth and ethanolic extract showed inhibition in both bacterial and fungal growth. Aqueous and ethanolic extract of M. sapientum showed good antimicrobial properties. The antimicrobial properties of these active compounds were substantiated by in silico method.

Speaker
Biography:

Partha Pratim Kalita has completed his MSc in Bioinformatics from Dibrugarh University. He is currently working as an Assistant Professor, Department of Biotechnology, Assam Down Town University and also as Guest Faculty in many colleges. He has delivered many talks in different seminars and workshops related to Bioinformatics.

Abstract:

Ligand files were downloaded from the ZINC database and chemical similarity search were carried out with respect to the reference drug in Molsoft ICM-Browser. Drug like compounds were also downloaded from databases like PubChem, ChemBank and ChemSpider for virtual screening. Physio-chemical properties calculation was done for the compounds, analogs were designed and biological activity spectra for the compounds were determined. Force field calculation and energy minimization were done for compounds that did not show toxicity. Molecular docking was performed and the best compounds were subjected to ADME filtering. Compounds did not violate the Lipinski’s rule of five and 16 compounds were found to show the non-toxicity i.e., ZINC03279352, ZINC03589279, ZINC06484328, ZINC00127171, ZINC02043125, ZINC03545511, ZINC04723044, PB-2290952, PB-2431617, PB-24733779, PB-24739752, PB-24769795, CMB-2102947, CMS-4517, CMS-4853, CMS-5149 while 16 of analogs were found as the best Pharmacophore i.e., arctigenin, ART-1, ART-2, ART-3, ART-4, ART-5, ART-6, ART-8, ART-9, ART-14, ART-15, ART-16,ART-17, ART-18, ART-19, ART-20. Post docking analysis confirmed 5 compounds as more potent than the control drug. The results according to Rerank scores are PUBCHM-24739752 (41.965), ZINC06484328 (89.252), PBCHM-24733779 (91.293), CMSP-5149 (196.892), ART-8 (236.807), Arctigenin (360.622). The compounds, ART-8 (1.75 Ao), PBCHM-24733779 (1.79 Ao), ZINC06484328 (1.99 Ao), PUBCHM-24739752 (2.26 Ao), CMSP-5149 (2.78 Ao) can be predicted as potential inhibitors that will be able to inhibit the activity of GRIK1 and may be considered as promising lead molecules against Japanese Encephalitis. The findings of the study need to be validated by future large scale study on animal models.

Prabina Kumar Meher

Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute, India

Title: A Hybrid approach for identifying 5\' splicing junction with higher accuracy

Time : 13:50-14:10

Speaker
Biography:

Prabina Kumar Meher has completed his PhD in the year 2014 from Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi. He is currently working as a Scientist in the Division of Statistical Genetics at Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute, a premier institute in the field of agricultural statistics. His area of interest is Statistical Genetics/Genomics and Computational Biology. He is currently working in the area of splice site prediction in eukaryotes. He has published 7 research papers in the last year.

Abstract:

Identification of splice site is essential for annotation of genes. Though existing approaches have achieved an acceptable level of accuracy, still there is a need for improvement in the accuracy. Besides, most of the approaches are species-specific and have used longer sequence motif to train the classification model. Therefore, it is required to develop an approach compatible with short sequence motif as well as provide higher accuracy across the species. The real and pseudo splice site sequences on human, bovine, fish and worm were collected from public domain. Then, each splice site sequence of 15 nucleotides long was transformed into a numeric vector of length 49, out of which 4 were positional, 4 were dependency and 41 were compositional features. Using transformed real and pseudo splice site dataset, prediction was made through SVM with radial basis kernel function. Using balanced training set, the proposed approach achieved AUC-ROC of 96.05%, 96.96%, 96.95%, 96.24% and AUC-PR of 97.64%, 97.89%, 97.91%, 97.90%, while tested on human, bovine, fish and worm datasets respectively. On the other hand, AUC-ROC of 97.21%, 97.45%, 97.41%, 98.06% and AUC-PR of 93.24%, 93.34%, 93.38% and 92.29% were obtained, while imbalanced training datasets were used. Further, the proposed approach outperformed most of the splice site prediction approaches while compared using bench mark NN269 dataset. Thus, we believe that the proposed approach can be used as a complementary method to the existing methods.

Speaker
Biography:

Prachi Srivastava has completed her PhD under a collaborative project of IITR and KGMU Lucknow in the area of Eales’ Disease Diabetic Retinopathy and Uveitis. She has completed Doctorate degree from Lucknow University. She has served as an Academician and also as honorary Biotechnology Counsellor. She has many awards and publications to her credit. She is a Member of many national and international societies and Reviewer and Editorial Team Member of many reputed journals.

Abstract:

MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNA gene products about 18 to 24-nt-long. Mainly they negatively regulate protein expression of specific mRNA by either translational inhibition or mRNAs degradation. Mature miRNAs are the results of successive processing of primary transcripts (pri-miRNAs) which are facilitated by two RNase III enzymes, Drosha and Dicer with a characteristic hairpin secondary structure. Reporting of the aberrant expressions of miRNAs have been done in respect to different human diseases mainly in concern with cancer viz., lung cancer, brain cancer, chronic lymphocytic leukemia, neurodegenerative diseases etc. It is well established fact that miRNAs defines the expression patterns of the tissue-specificity. Neurodegenerative disease states the physiological nature of the cell, expression of miR-29a, miR-29b-1 and miR-9 are found significantly down regulated in Alzheimer’s disease. Biopsies of tumor from Parkinson’s disease patients exposed association of miR-30b, miR-30c and miR-26a. Phylogenetic analysis of miRNA of Alzheimer and Huntington diseases gives insight into evolutionary relationship and reveals regulation of Mir-22, Mir 29a and mir-128-1 in both diseases. Mir-22 shows down-regulation in Parkinson disease and Alzheimer disease while mir-128-1 and mir-29a shows the difference in their regulation pattern. In Alzheimer disease mir-128-1 is up regulated while in Huntington disease it is down regulated. Mir-29a is up regulated in Huntington disease while in Alzheimer disease, it is down regulated. These findings illustrates the importance of miRNA research in neurodegenerative diseases with reference to novel targets identification which can give a better lead in concern to protective or prophylective approaches.

Speaker
Biography:

Md Imtaiyaz Hassan has completed his PhD from All India Institute of Medical Sciences and Postdoctoral studies from Saint Louis University School of Medicine, USA. He is working as an Assistant Professor in a Premier Central University, Jamia Millia Islamia, New Delhi. He has published more than 70 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of Journal of Protein and Proteomics, Journal of Natural Science, Biology and Medicine and many other journals.

Abstract:

Calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CAMK4) is a key player of calcium-dependent gene expression and thus involved in varieties of cellular function including cell signaling and neuronal survival and associated with many diseases including cancer. Here, we first studied the interaction of curcumin with human CAMK4 at physiological pH 7.2 by using molecular docking, molecular dynamics (MD) simulation and fluorescence & surface Plasmon resonance methods. After docking of curcumin to the CAMK4 active site we performed MD simulations for both keto and enol forms of curcumin-CAMK4 complexes for a reasonably long time (150 ns) to see the overall stability of the ligand-protein complex. We found that a significant conformational change occurred in the CAMK4 upon binding of curcumin. The experimental results show that the fluorescence intensity of CAMK4 was significantly increased while addition of curcumin. We have further measured the binding affinity of curcumin to the CAMK4 using SPR and found kD=3.7×10-8 M. Based on such study, we have designed several pyrimidine and thiol based compounds which were successfully synthesized. Several of these ligands are showing their binding affinity in the nm range with the CAMK4. This study will provide insights into designing of the new inspired coumarin derivatives as therapeutic agents against many life threatening diseases. Finally, we have successfully designed and synthesized very effective small molecule Cam kinase inhibitors, serves as a model for the development of novel phamacophore for therapeutic intervention.

Speaker
Biography:

O Premila Chanu has obtained Master’s degree in the year 1986 and PhD in the year 1994. At present, she is working as an Associate Professor in Modern College, Imphal. She has published over 10 research papers in reputed national and international journals. She took part in many international and national conferences.

Abstract:

The different ethnic communities in Manipur has well-established knowledge, skills, beliefs and practices relating to promotion of positive health and avoidance of sickness even before the hospital oriented system of medicine. But we, the inhabitants are destroying our resource of medicinal plants for our livelihood, construction of houses and offices unknowingly of the hazards made by ourselves to us. The current study is presenting the tissue culture of an endangered medicinal plant, Melothria perpusilla used specially in liver diseases using Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium in different combinations. Morphogenetic changes were observed in Melothria perpusilla explants in the MS supplemented with different concentrations of PGR. Different colours of callus formation were observed in MS supplemented with BAP, kinetin and IBA.

Speaker
Biography:

Paulami Chatterjee has completed her Post graduation in Biochemistry from Calcutta University. She is currently a Senior Research Fellow pursuing her PhD under the guidance of Dr. Debjani Roy at Biophysics Department, Bose Institute, Kolkata. She has so far published 2 papers in reputed journals and has presented her work in 1 national and 2 international conference.

Abstract:

Protein-protein interaction domain, PDZ (Postsynaptic density-95/Discs large/Zona occludens-1) plays a critical role in efficient synaptic transmission in brain. Dysfunction of synaptic transmission is thought to be the underlying basis of many neuropsychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Glutamate receptor interacting protein 1 (GRIP1) family proteins contain six to seven PDZ domains which help in protein-protein interaction. GRIP1 interacts with the ionotropic glutamate receptors of the AMPA type which in turn are involved in the pathophysiology of several neurodegenerative processes including Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and Huntington’s diseases. In this study we have used the protein expression data of AD patients obtained from liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) experimental procedure. The differentially expressed proteins were then considered for construction of protein-protein interaction network (PPIN). GRIP1 was found to be differentially expressed in the protein expression data. Interestingly, it was also identified as one of the topologically significant proteins in the PPIN. Till date very few studies have analyzed the detailed structural basis of PDZ mediated protein interaction of GRIP1. In order to gain better understanding of structural and dynamic basis of these interactions we employed molecular dynamic simulations. The analysis of MD simulations shows considerable conformational flexibilities of the PDZ domain of GRIP1 which may require for its multimerization. Our study may provide detailed information about structural basis of PDZ mediated protein interaction of GRIP1 which may lead to novel therapeutic approaches in AD.

Speaker
Biography:

Vidushi Sharma is currently a PhD Scholar in Delhi Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Research (DIPSAR), Department of Pharmaceutical Chemistry (affiliated to University of Delhi). She has completed Masters in Pharmaceutical Chemistry from DIPSAR and then she has worked as an Assistant Professor for about 2 years. She is presently working on DST funded project.

Abstract:

The current phosphodiesterase 4 subtype-b (PDE4b) inhibitors also inhibit its close subtype PDE4d resulting to severe adverse effects. It makes the selective inhibition of PDE4b a demanding task to design safe, next-generation drugs against asthma and inflammation. In the present study, crystal structure analysis was performed to distinguish the PDE4b and PDE4d selectivity on the basis of ligand binding. The analysis showed volume difference in the catalytic cavity regions of PDE4b and PDE4d. In addition to this, the position of key residue Tyr274 in PDE4b was reported to be occupied by Phe196 in PDE4d. Using the interactions profile of inhibitors with key residues, we developed a PDE4b selective pharmacophore to screen around 2.5 lakhs drug-like molecules from specs database. The top 1000 lead molecules were docked in PDE4b using Glide XP. The molecules that made H-bonds with Tyr274, Gln615, Hie450, His406, Tyr405, Asp564 or Asn455 were shortlisted. These shortlisted molecules bind with less affinity to other isoform when cross-docked in PDE4d structure. Also the molecules did not show any hydrogen bond in PDE4d. Future biological evaluation and further refinement of such PDE4b selective inhibitors would aid in development of new, anti-inflammatory drugs.