Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 6th World Congress on Biotechnology Crowne Plaza , New Delhi, India.

Day 2 :

Conference Series Biotechnology-2015 International Conference Keynote Speaker Mousumi Mutsuddi photo
Biography:

Mousumi Mutsuddi is currently a Faculty in the Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Banaras Hindu University, India. She has received her PhD degree from the Cytogenetics Laboratory, Banaras Hindu University, India. She subsequently obtained her Research Trainings at University of Massachusetts, USA and Whitehead Institute of Biomedical Research in Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA. She was a Research Scientist at Broad Institute (Harvard University and Massachusetts Institute of Technology), USA and has joined Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Banaras Hindu University in 2006. Her lab has identified novel genes in Drosophila which have important role to play in apoptosis and neuronal development. Her work has been accepted recently for publication in "Genetics" which is a premier journal publication by the Genetics Society of America. She was also a Visiting Scientist at MIT in 2008 and at National Eye Institute, NIH, Bethesda (2012-2013). She is on the Editorial Boards of Journal of Neuro-Infectious Disease, USA, Journal of Cell Science & Molecular, India and several other journals. She is also the Reviewing Board Member for journals like Neurogenetics, Biomed Central, Journal of Neurological disorders, Journal of Genetics, FEBS letter, PlosOne, etc.rnrn

Abstract:

Notch signalling is an evolutionary conserved process that influences cell differentiation, cell proliferation and cell death in a context dependent manner. Notch signalling is fine-tuned at multiple levels and mis-regulation of Notch has been implicated in a variety of human diseases ranging from neurological disorders to cancer. We have identified maheshvara (mahe), a novel gene in Drosophila melanogaster which encodes a putative DEAD box protein that is highly conserved across taxa and belongs to the largest group of RNA helicase. Dynamic pattern of mahe expression along with the maternal accumulation of its transcripts is seen during early stages of embryogenesis. In addition, a strong expression is also seen in the developing nervous system. Ectopic expression of mahe in a wide range of tissue during development results in a variety of defects, many of which resemble typical Notch loss-of-function phenotype. We have shown that ectopic expression of mahe in the wing imaginal disc leads to loss of Notch targets, Cut and Wingless. Interestingly, Notch protein levels are also lowered, whereas no obvious change is seen in the levels of Notch transcripts. In addition, mahe overexpression can significantly rescue ectopic Notch mediated proliferation of eye tissue. Further, we illustrate that mahe genetically interacts with Notch and deltex in transheterozygous combination. Co-expression of Dx and Mahe at D/V boundary results in wing nicking phenotype and a more pronounced loss of Notch target Cut. Taken together we report identification of a novel evolutionary conserved RNA helicase mahe, which plays a vital role in regulation of Notch signalling.

  • Track-4: Cancer and Genomics Research Track-5: Genetic Engineering and rDNA Technology Track-8: Animal Biotechnology and Cell Culture
Location: Hall-1

Chair

Mukesh Verma

National Institutes of Health, USA

Speaker

Co-Chair

Kaiser Jamil

Bhagwan Mahavir Medical Research Center(BMMRC), India

Speaker
Biography:

Bhargavi S D has completed her Masters in Microbiology from the Department of Microbiology and Biotechnology, Bangalore University in the year 2011. She is currently pursuing her PhD in the field of Industrial Microbiology in the same department.

Abstract:

Cervical cancer is the second most common malignancy in women worldwide and thus is one of the leading causes of mortality in women. Lovastatin, a non polar, anti-cholesterol drug has previously been reported to exert antitumor activity in vitro. In the present study, lovastatin from Aspergillus terreus (KM017963) was purified by adsorption chromatography and evaluated for its anticancer and antioxidant properties in human cervical cancer cell lines (HeLa). The growth inhibitory and pro-apoptotic effects of purified lovastatin on HeLa cell lines were investigated by determining its influence on cytotoxicity, Mitochondrial Membrane Potential (MMP), DNA fragmentation and antioxidant property (Hydroxy radical scavenging effect and the levels of total reduced glutathione). Flow cytometry analysis by propidium iodide staining confirmed the induction of apoptotic cell death and revealed cell cycle arrest at G0/G1 phase. Results of the study give leads for anticancer effects of lovastatin and its potential usefulness in the chemotherapy of cervical cancer.

Speaker
Biography:

Suresh Kumar Jatawa has completed his MSc in Biotechnology from Dr. Hari Singh Gour Central University Sagar, India and he is currently pursuing his Doctorate from Rajiv Gandhi Proudyogiki Vishwavidyalaya (State Technological University of Madhya Pradesh), India. He has published more than 20 papers in reputed journals and in national & international conferences.

Abstract:

Expression profiling of genes that coordinate the mechanisms of DNA repair, cell cycle control, apoptosis and oncogenesis offers a great opportunity for studying multi factor diseases and for understanding the key role of genes in mechanisms which drive a normal cell to a cancer state. Gallbladder cancer (GBC) is an uncommon but highly malignant tumor with varied geographical distribution and poor diagnostic manifestation in early stage. This necessitated a more objective elucidation of GBC at its molecular level. Tissues of (92) patients of gallbladder cancer were examined for gene expression, microsatellite instability and apoptosis through in-house standardized protocols. Resulting data have shown that the women are at high risk for GBC with maximum cases of adenocarcinoma (76%). Highest number of cases has been diagnosed for moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma (68.57%), which evidence lack of proper diagnosis. Mutations of cell cycle regulatory proteins were detected comprehensively in adenocarcinomas (p<0.001). Out of these the expression frequency of cell cycle regulatory genes was higher in moderately differentiated adenocarcinoma in comparison to poorly and well differentiated ones. Microsatellite instability may also be an independent prognostic marker for assessing risk of occurrence in superficial tumors irrespective of the grade. Together these results imply that the isocyanates are potent enough to cause genomic instability under both occupational and accidental exposures along with providing us the impetus for detailed interpretation of the patho-physiological implications of exposure to human beings. We anticipate these data would help us in designing better approaches in risk assessment of future industrial disasters.

Yatendra Kumar Satija

University of Delhi, India

Title: Regulation of p73 and its role in suppressing metastasis

Time : 11:30-11:45

Speaker
Biography:

Yatendra Kumar Satija has completed his PhD from National Institute of Immunology. He is currently working as DST-INSPIRE Faculty at Dr. B. R. Ambedkar Center for Biomedical Research, University of Delhi. He has published four papers in reputed journals (publications in Oncogene, Molecular Cell, International Journal of Cancer and Transcription). He has been serving as an Editorial Board Member and Reviewer Board Member of several national and international journals. He has received many awards including DST International Travel Support Award, CSIR foreign travel grant, Best Poster Award on National Science Day Poster Competition at NII, CSIR-JRF etc.

Abstract:

p73 is a member of the p53 tumor suppressor family, which transactivates p53-responsive genes and mediates DNA damage response. Similar to p53, p73 is also maintained at a very low level in non-stressed cells but it rapidly gets induced and activated upon genotoxic insults. The objective of our study was to find out novel interactors of p73 which distinctively regulates its stability and activity in normal state and upon DNA damage. We performed a sequential immunoprecipitation screen to identify p73-associated proteins which specifically interact with p73 under unstressed and genotoxic stress conditions. Our differential proteomics screening lead us to identification of many p73-associated proteins. Our results demonstrated that, TRIM28, a RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase interacts with p73 under unstressed conditions but not after etoposide treatment. TRIM28 ubiquitylates and targets p73 for proteasome-mediated degradation in normal conditions; however, upon genotoxic stress, phosphorylation of p73 at tyrosine 99 position by c-Abl kinase leads to abrogation of its interaction with TRIM28 thereby promoting p73 stabilization. On the contrary end another protein, MED15, only interacts with tyrosine 99 phosphorylated p73 and it serves as a co-activator of p73. Abrogation of MED15 expression leads to decline in p73-mediated transactivation and disrupts p73 tumor suppressor and anti-metastatic functions. Furthermore, p73 is emerging as an important player in suppression of metastasis. In this direction, we performed a customized quantitative RT-PCR array analysis. We identified several novel downstream targets of p73 which have anti-metastatic functions. Thus our work provides extensive insights regarding anti-metastatic role of p73.

Amrita Saxena

Banaras Hindu University(IIT), India

Title: Phyllopsheric Trichoderma spp. as a new entrant for managing foliar phytopathogens

Time : 11:45-12:00

Speaker
Biography:

Amrita Saxena has recently completed her PhD from Banaras Hindu University. She is a Gold Medalist in her Post graduation studies. She has published research papers in reputed journals and serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

Abstract:

Sustainable approach by employing biological control strategies to manage the losses caused by phytopathogens has been proposed as a silver lining to beget the lost ecological homeostasis. Keeping track to the climatic change in the environment leading to aberrant harm to agriculture, BCAs that are efficient abiotic stress tolerant apart from possessing antagonistic ability should be opted. The microbial community dwelling at the phylloplane of the leaves cope directly with the environmental alterations. And hence are more stress tolerant than those found at the rhizospheric region of the plants. A study was carried out to compare the ability of the Trichoderma isolates obtained from the phylloplane of healthy chilli leaves with those obtained from the rhizospheric region in terms of providing better protection against the anthracnose causing pathogen, Colletotrichum capsici. Interesting results were obtained which supported the possibility of using phyllospheric Trichoderma isolates against the anthracnose causing pathogen. The screened Trichoderma isolates obtained from the phyllosphere region were found to show elevation in induction of defense networking in host chilli plants akin to that shown by the rhizospheric Trichoderma isolates as evident by HPLC phenolic profiling, defense gene expression studies and histochemical staining procedures. The increment in phenolic and defense related enzymes suggested the direct influence of the antagonist on the induction of defense response of the plant on pathogen challenge. The study suggests the benefit of incorporating phyllospheric Trichoderma isolates for providing a dual protection to plants against foliar pathogens along with better survivability to the prevalent climate change.

Sheetal Saini

ICAR-National Research Center on Equines, India

Title: Assessment of biological activity of recombinant equine IL-18 and IFN-γ

Time : 12:00-12:15

Speaker
Biography:

Sheetal Saini is currently pursuing her PhD from Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa and her area of research work is cytokine biology.

Abstract:

Research focusing on evaluating equine cytokines relied on the detection of mRNA rather than proteins due to limited availability of equine cytokines. Thus, the present work was undertaken to obtain biologically active recombinant equine IL-18 and IFN-γ. The coding sequences of equine IL-18 and IFN-γ gene were cloned and identity was confirmed by sequence analysis. Subsequently, recombinant equine IL-18 and IFN-γ were expressed in Escherichia coli and proteins were purified by Nickel-NTA chromatography. Biological activity of recombinant cytokines was assessed by lymphocyte proliferation assay, cytokine ELISA and real time RT-PCR. For lymphocyte proliferation assay, 4×105 equine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were cultured per well in 96 well culture plate and stimulated with different concentration of recombinant cytokines and Concanavalin A (5 µg/ml) as positive control. At 72 hours post stimulation, cell proliferation assay was performed by XTT method. Recombinant equine IL-18 and IFN-γ induced significant proliferation at 500 ng/ml concentration. Secretion of IL-10 and IFN-γ by activated PBMCs was assessed by ELISA at protein level and by real-time PCR at mRNA level. Recombinant IL-18 was able to induce the production of both IL-10 and IFN-γ (100 pg/ml) in equine PBMC while IFN-γ induced IL-10 secretion (100 pg/ml). On the other hand, IL-18 induced IFN-γ & IL-10 transcripts by 128 fold and IL-2 & IL-4 by 64 fold while IFN-γ induced transcription of IL-10 by 128 fold, IL-4 by 64 fold and IL-2 by 32 fold. Results indicate that recombinant equine cytokines activate the immune cells and stimulate the secretion of natural cytokines.

Speaker
Biography:

Vertika Singh is currently pursuing her PhD from the Reproductive Genetics Laboratory at the Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Banaras Hindu University. Her areas of interest include genetics and genomics of human male infertility. She has published one paper entitled “Chromosome microarray analysis: A case report of infertile brothers with CATSPER gene deletion”.

Abstract:

Infertility is defined as the inability of a sexually active, non-contracepting couple to achieve pregnancy in one year of regular coitus. It affects 10-15% of the couples worldwide and nearly half of these can be attributed to the male partner. In more than 30-40% of the cases, no male-infertility-associated factor is found (idiopathic male infertility). Human male infertility is a multifactorial disorder encompassing a wide variety of genetic risk factors involved in the regulation of diverse biological pathways. We undertook a multi-pronged approach to investigate the etiology of male infertility and identify new players in spermatogenesis. The investigations consisted of candidate gene analysis, cytogenetic whole genome array and gene expression analysis of eighty-four genes of DNA repair pathways. The candidate genes were chosen from the various pathways such as one carbon folate pathway (MTHFR), detoxification pathway (GSTT1, GSTM1), apoptotic pathway (FAS, FASL, GRTH) and immunological pathways (IL1RN, IL1B). For the whole genome cytogenetic array, we employed Affymetrix CytoScan 750K array characterized by more than 750,000 markers for copy number analysis. Cytogenetic whole genome array is a high-resolution genome analysis that allows screening of thousands of loci at a time. It also allows detection of sub-microscopic aberration screening for gains/losses (duplications/deletions) throughout the genome. Further, we performed the expression analysis of the candidate genes of DNA damage, repair and apoptotic pathways. The association studies revealed a significant association of a number of candidate gene variants with impaired spermatogenesis. The expression analysis revealed an altered expression of DNA damage, repair and apoptotic pathway genes in severely impaired testicular phenotypes. The genome analysis detected a common gain in the 19p13.3 region in 4 (28.5%) cases. The region harbors a number of genes, such as STK11, FSTL3, PTB1, KISS1R, ABCA7, GPX4, CIRBP that are known to play an important role in spermatogenesis. In conclusion, the present study suggests that the pathology of human male infertility is associated with a number of genetic variations involved in the regulation of diverse biological pathways and it opens up new horizons for further investigation of the role of these genes in spermatogenesis.

Speaker
Biography:

M. Boothapandi is currently pursuing his Ph.D under the guidance of Prof. R. Ramanibai, Department of Zoology, University of Madras, Chennai. The aim of his research work is to investigate the Immunomodulatory and chemoprevntive role of active compounds isolated from I.tinctoria and S.dulcis through invitro and invivo studies.

Abstract:

In this study, we investigated the effects of ethanolic and aqueous extracts of I. tinctoria on Wistar albino rat immune cells function in vitro. We examined the macrophage activation and lymphocyte proliferation and found that both ethanolic and aqueous extracts were potentially enhanced the peritoneal macrophage activation and peripheral blood lymphocytes proliferation in a dose dependent manner. In macrophage activation, ethanolic and aqueous extracts of I. tinctoria enhance the Nitric Oxide (NO) production to 82±5.0 µmol/ml and 73±2.0 µmol/ml at 100 µg per ml and suppress the arginase activity to 0.85 U/ml and 1.0 U/ml at concentration of 100 µg/ml. Pinocytic result indicates that both extracts have probably enhanced macrophage activation. Lysosomal activity of macrophage was enhanced up to 72.38±0.1% and 58.24±0.1% at 100 µg per ml of both ethanolic and aqueous extracts respectively. Phagocytosis activity of macrophage was enhanced to 80±3.0% and 72±2.0% by both ethanolic and aqueous extracts in 100 µg/ml concentration. In peripheral blood lymphocytes both ethanolic and aqueous extract effectively increased the lymphocyte proliferation in the EC50 value of 32.27 µg per ml and 49.06 µg per ml after 72 hours incubation. Collectively, these results demonstrated that both extracts of I. tinctoria act as potential immunomodulator.

Piyali Das

West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, India

Title: Development of animal cartilage for application in human patient

Time : 12:45-13:00

Speaker
Biography:

Piyali Das has completed her MSc (Microbiology) degree from University of Calcutta in the year 2013 and she is currently working as project SRF under the guidance of Dr. Samit K Nandi in a DBT sponsored project at West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, Kolkata, India and also enrolled for PhD in Microbiology. She has participated in various national and state level seminars in the course of her study so far and gathered experience and valuable information in various fields related to microbiology, biotechnology and modern biology. Recently, in an international seminar she has also got felicitation on ‘Best Poster Award’.

Abstract:

The present experiment started with the development of acelullar goat choncal cartilage by glutaraldehyde treatment (0.25% and 1%) for a particular time interval. The soluble protein was extracted and estimated from the native and treated cartilage. The molecular weight was also determined by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Further, delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) reaction was carried out in rabbits against acelullar and native cartilage protein. In vitro immunocompatibility assay which include lymphocyte proliferation assay and cytotoxicity assay were performed using rabbit peripheral blood mononuclear cells before and after xeno-transplantation with treated cartilage. Detection of antibody by agar gel precipitation test (AGPT) on xeno-transplanted rabbits was also assessed at regular time intervals. The in vitro cellular reactivity was found to be less in case of processed cartilage protein than untreated protein and control in both naïve (before xeno-transplantation) and sensitized (after xeno-transplantation) rabbits. Absence of clear precipitin bands in AGPT indicates the absence of specific antibody against ‘treated’ cartilage protein. Absence of any type of DTH reactions after injecting ‘treated’ protein (intradermally) to the animals indicates that the cartilage protein was less reactive. Histological evaluation of treated cartilage sample showed degeneration, loss of chondrocytes and formation of multiple numbers of vacuoles in the cartilaginous matrix as compared to untreated sample where there was presence of fibrocartilaginous structure characterized by formation of well organized chondroblast and chondrocytes. After 3 months of post xeno-transplantation in vivo, cartilages along with the surrounding tissues were histochemically studied, this involved the qualitative estimation of collagen, reticulin and elastin fibers. It was observed that the orientations of these three elements are properly arranged in the cartilaginous matrix and maintained their normal structure. Based on the result, it can be inferred that this acellular cartilages have tremendous potential for application in human plastic surgery patients.

Speaker
Biography:

Pallavi Shah has completed her PhD in Molecular Biology and Biotechnology from College of Basic Sciences and Humanities, G.B. Pant University of Agriculture & Technology in 2014 with minor in Microbiology. She was awarded CSIR NET JRF and SRF during her Doctoral studies.

Abstract:

The present study was undertaken to assess the hepatoprotective efficacy of hydroethanolic leaf extracts of Murraya koenigii and Phyllanthus niruri against paracetamol (PCM) and ethanol induced damage in human hepatoma HepG2 cell line. MTT based cytotoxicity assay was used to determine the doses of toxicants i.e., PCM 15 mM and ethanol 50 mM, alcohol water extract of M. koenigii (AWEMK, 100 µg/ml) and P. niruri (AWEPN, 20 µg/ml) and silymarin (10 µg/ml) to be used for challenging the cells. Toxicity in cells was induced by treatment with 15 mM PCM and 50 mM ethanol for 24 hours as manifested by a significant (p<0.05) decrease in cell viability, increase in the leakage of serum glutamate oxaloacetate transaminase (SGOT) and serum glutamate pyruvate (SGPT) in culture medium, increase in lipid peroxidation (LPO) and reduction in reduced glutathione (GSH) in cell lysate. These alterations were significantly ameliorated when cells were treated with combination of extracts (AWEMK and AWEPN) and silymarin during both prophylactic and curative studies. The pre-conditioning with combination of extracts for 24 hours whereas post treatment for 12 hours provided maximum protection against increase in SGOT and SGPT levels induced by PCM and ethanol. 24 hours of pre-incubation and 24 hours of post treatment with extracts was able to restore the increased MDA levels and diminished GSH levels to normalcy. Gene expression analysis of phase I and phase II metabolizing enzymes revealed that pre-conditioning influenced CYP1A2 (Cytochrome P4501A2) and GGT (Gamma Glutamyl Transferase) expression but could not influence the GST (Glutathione-S-Transferase) expression at later time intervals. Pre-conditioning thus influenced the initial steps of PCM metabolism where CYP1A2 and GGT initially play a significant role. Post conditioning with extracts showed high expression of CYP1A2 gene whereas it could not suppress GST expression showing no interference with initial metabolism of PCM. The GGT expression was suppressed in post treatment samples showing their antioxidant nature. Pre conditioning provided better hepatoprotection against PCM and ethanol induced damage thus emphasizing the dire need of including such plants in our dietary habits for boosting our hepatic function.

Speaker
Biography:

Synan F Abu Qamar completed his PhD from Purdue University, Department of Botany & Plant Pathology in 2007 and his Postdoctoral studies in the same University in the area of Molecular Genetics of Plant Immunity. In August 2008, he joined the Department of Biology at the United Arab Emirates University as an Assistant Professor. Currently, he is an Associate Professor. His current research interest is in the area of Plant Molecular Genetics/Plant Biotechnology. He is a co-author of number of publications in peer-reviewed international journals and serves as an Editorial Board Member in reputed journals.

Abstract:

Plant responses involve changes at the cellular, physiological and molecular levels to adapt with biotic and abiotic stresses. We investigated the effects of combinations of different environmental stresses on the transcriptome level of Arabidopsis genome using comparative microarrays. We showed a unique program of gene expression activated in response to each biotic and abiotic stress. In addition, about 25% cold-, 6% drought-, 12% oxidative stress-, 2.5% heat-, 19% salinity- and 41% osmotic stresses-induced genes were commonly up-regulated with B. cinerea treatment; and 33%, 7%, 5.5%, 7.6%, 19% and 48% of genes commonly down-regulated with B. cinerea treatment, respectively. We investigated the role of cyclopentenones in mediating responses to B. cinerea infection and abiotic stress through TGA transcription factors, independent of jasmonic acid. Changes in the transcript levels of genes encoding components of the cyclopentenone signaling pathway in response to biotic and abiotic stresses suggest that the oxylipin signal transduction pathway plays a role in plant defense. The overlapping of plant responses to abiotic and biotic stresses unravels the complexity of genes and networks, provides new programs for resistance to multiple environmental stresses. Future directions to further analyze the functions of commonly expressed genes in response to environmental stresses will increase our understanding of the plant stress response.

Speaker
Biography:

Veena Agrawal is teaching and conducting research in the Department of Botany, University of Delhi in the area of Plant Biotechnology (Micropropagation, genetic transformation and evaluation of biomolecules in the medicinal plants) since 1990. She has developed more than 25 micropropagation protocols of economically important plant taxa. She has published over 75 research papers in international/national peer reviewed journals and immensely contributed (over 100 abstracts) her research in many international conferences, delivered invited lectures and chaired the technical sessions. She has visited many countries namely Israel, Nepal, Australia in connection with research. She is awarded with several fellowships: Indian Society of Plant Physiology (FISPP) and International Society of Plant Morphologists (FISPM) and is an elected Member of PTCA (I). For the first time, she developed sex-linked markers in Jojoba, an oil yielding dioecious crop. She has filed five Indian patents. She has been on the Editorial Board and Reviewer of various prestigious international projects and journals.

Abstract:

Artemisinin is a naturally occurring biomolecule in Artemisia annua, known for its anti-malarial as well as anti-cancerous activity. In vitro enhancement in artemisinin content has been achieved employing biotic (Piriformospora indica and Agrobacterium rhizogenes strain A4) and abiotic (such as heavy metals and salicylic acid) elicitors with different explants in various MS media compositions were employed. A significant enhancement in artemisinin content of 60% was achieved in shoot cultures co-cultivated with P. indica. Hairy root cultures raised through leaf explants of A. annua when exposed to different concentration of Pb, Hg, Co and SA have shown a tremendous enhancement in artemisinin, the maximum elevation reaching to 1450% in lead nitrate (100 mg/L) supplemented medium over control. For abiotic stress, nodal explants if exposed to various heavy metal (Ag, Cu, Hg, Co and Zn) salts too revealed significant increase in artemisinin production, the optimum being 50% at 100 mg/L of Cu and Zn. The crude extract of A. annua has been fractionated, isolated and characterized through CC, TLC, FT-IR and NMR. Bioassays conducted with crude extract of leaves against larvae of malaria (Anopheles stephensi) and dengue (Aedesaegypti) vectors have shown a strong larvicidal activity and on human oral cancer cell line causing 98.5% mortality. This is our first report of elicitation of artemisinin in A. annua employing P. indica and hairy roots coupled with abiotic stresses.

Bipin J Agrawal

The Maharaja Sayajirao University of Baroda, India

Title: Ayurvastra: Herbal fabrics designed for healing

Time : 14:30-14:50

Speaker
Biography:

Bipin J Agrawal is working in The M S University of Baroda as an Associate Professor. He has teaching experience of 23 years and Industrial experience of 11 years. He has published more than 70 papers in reputed journals and has presented 54 research/review/technical papers at various seminars and conferences at National and International level. He has also conducted technical sessions at several conferences as Chairperson/President. He is a Fellow Member of One National (Indian) Association and Five International Associations. He is serving as Editor-In-Chief for International Journal of Research in Sciences” and International Association of Science & Technical Education and Research. He is also serving as the Editorial Board Member for 18 other reputed International journals and has been a member of Advisory Committee of various institutions for organizing seminars and conferences.

Abstract:

Ayurvastra is a branch of Ayurveda, the ancient 5,000 year old Indian system of Vedic healthcare. Loosely translated, “ayur” in Sanskrit is for health, “veda” means wisdom, and “vastra” is cloth or clothing. Ayurvastra clothing is made from organic cotton fabric that has been permeated with special herbs and oils that promote health and cure special diseases depending upon the blends of embedded herbs and oils. There is a whole spectrum of colors that can be obtained from a multitude of plants, insects and fungi; and these have been used across the centuries to dye textiles, color artefacts, pattern and color our skin/hair, and even color the food we eat. Various natural dyes and herbal products are found to be self-healing when they are applied on the fabrics. Ayurvastra cloth is used by Ayurveda Health Clinics in the treatment of a broad range of diseases such as diabetes, skin infections, eczema, psoriasis, hypertension and high blood pressure, asthma, arthritis, rheumatism and even some forms of cancer. Ayurvastra clothing is believed to help restore balance within the body’s system and strengthen the immune system. Indeed, the natural dyes are better products, simply because they do not contain chemicals harmful to health. Ayurvastra technology is beneficial to the mankind in curing diseases with the help of the medicinal characteristics associated with various herbs. It is environmental-friendly process and the usage of the cloth is based on the principle of touch. Today, the revival of this ancient technology is gaining importance all over the world. Other cultures and regions of the world are expressing their growing interest in more traditional and natural healthcare systems that are based upon restoring balance and health through natural methods rather than through Western medicines.

Rahul Basu

Sambhram Institute of Technology, India

Title: Processing urban waste for energy for reduced greenhouse gases

Time : 14:50-15:10

Speaker
Biography:

Rahul Basu is a Professor at Sambhram Institute of Technology, under VTU. Experience in Biotechnology and Renewable energy extends to Solar energy, Biogas, gas turbines, non polluting motive power sources like Stirling technology, associated with the Environmental Protection Agency in RTP, NC in areas of pollution modeling with the UNAMAP series then on mainframe, which were adapted to PC format using an expert system engine. He has also been associated with other companies in the RTP area in .project submissions for Bioenergy, and has since continued his work in pollution and renewable energy including the Kuznets curve.

Abstract:

Increasing CO2 and other carbon emissions classed as pollutants is a major concern worldwide. The generation of power from imported fossil fuels remains a major source for underdeveloped and developing countries. Deforestation and depletion of green cover in urban areas and surroundings is a daily phenomenon coupled with rising urban population, migration into the cities, poverty and unemployment. Together with cheap two wheeler transport large amounts of toxic gases are dumped into the overhead garbage bin, the atmosphere. Large amounts of waste material and trash are also generated in the mega urban population centers of India, like Mumbai, Delhi and Bangalore. Processing of urban waste has reached choke point in cities like Bangalore, where sewage is dumped directly into lakes by high rise luxury apartments built around scenic lakes and advertised for their aesthetic value. The use of waste material to produce biogas by bacterial action results in a sludge which has a high nitrogen and carbon content after methane production. The sludge can be reused as fertilizer and also further processed to give producer gas. Waste materials like coconut husk, agricultural and cellulosic wastes could be used directly. The disadvantage of slow reaction times from biogas (methane) production by bacterial action is avoided. The producer gas can be stored or used directly in place of LPG as a substitute for methane which has hazardous qualities. In earlier times in cities like Mumbai it was piped directly to homes for cooking and used as a petrol substitute in Europe for vehicles when petrol was scarce. The possibility of direct bacterial action on sludge to give alcohol is investigated.

Gayacharan

National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, India

Title: Rice landrace diversity in subsistence-oriented farming systems: Nutritional considerations

Time : 15:10-15:30

Speaker
Biography:

Gayacharan has completed his MSc from Tamil Nadu Agriculture University, Coimbatore and PhD from Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi. During the tenure of Postgraduation (MSc and PhD), he has been awarded with prestigious fellowships of DBT and CSIR, Government of India. He has been selected as Agricultural Research Scientist (ARS) in Agri. Biotechnology in the year 2013. He is currently posted in the Germplasm Evaluation Division of National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, a premier institution of international level.

Abstract:

Rice landraces play a very important role in food and nutritional security under subsistence farming systems in India across diverse agro-ecologies. These landraces have resisted the widespread cultivation of high yielding rice varieties due primarily to their greater adaptation to niche climate, nutrition and medicinal properties. We have extensively evaluated twenty seven prominent local landraces including black rice, red rice, aromatic rice and white rice from North-eastern (NE) Himalayan, North-western (NW) Himalayan and Southern region of India. Dehusked rice samples were used for studying nineteen important nutritional parameters. Protein (12.22-14.32%), total phosphorus (0.363-0.740 g/100 g), phytate (1.35-2.55 g/100 g) and Cu (1.090-2.141 mg/100 g) contents were significantly higher in NE landraces compared to landraces from other regions and the check variety HPR-2143. Chuhatu (7.29%) and Katheri (6.63%) registered much higher values for crude fat content than the check (3.05%). Antioxidant activity (CUPRAC μg/g GAE) was remarkably higher in black rice’s, ME-MR-1 (10.00) and MR-16 (8.10) followed by red rice’s ranging from 5.23 in Mirzaig to 3.57 in Katheri. Zn ranged from 2.56 mg in Bohana Dhan to 8.26 mg in Kalajoha, Fe ranged from 1.02 mg in Ragalvanji to 6.78 mg in Rangdi and Mg ranged from 66.84 mg in ME-MR-1 to 145.11 mg in Chittimuthyalu per 100 g basis. As limited information is available on nutritional profile of native landraces, the present proximate analyses of ethnic rice landraces reveal their important role in nutritional security of farming communities.

Speaker
Biography:

Virender Dhingra graduated with Highest Honors from CCSHAU, Haryana with degree in Veterinary Medicine, 1979 and Postgraduation in Veterinary Pathology, 1981 with specialization in Cancer Immuno-Pathology. Thereafter, he has undergone several advanced professional trainings in the field of Toxicology and Regulatory Affairs at various premier institutions in India and abroad. He is Executive Director & CEO of BIO-TOX (Toxicological data generation and registration support services), one of the leading organization having proven track record in successfully handling regulatory affairs of several leading national and multinational companies engaged in Crop Protection business (Microbial, Botanical, Biochemical & Chemical Pesticides).

Abstract:

Seed bio-priming with beneficial soil microorganisms (Bio-fertilizers & bio-pesticides) delivers longer-lasting protection against yield-robbing fungal/bacterial diseases by creating a “halo/nimbus of protection” around the seed and root system, which aids in the development of stronger, healthier root systems thereby leading to increased crop productivity and consistently better yields. Root health can hold the key to the ‘Next Green Revolution’. Opportunities and challenges for microbial seed inoculants in organic agriculture, in particular where conventional agricultural practice cannot be used, such as organic seed protection would be discussed. Role of seed bio-priming as a critical tool for enhanced productivity & soil health rejuvenation in organic/sustainable agriculture would also be deliberated.

Rana D P Singh

Sugarcane Research Station, India

Title: Genetic improvement of sugarcane for quality content and yield through breeding

Time : 16:30-16:50

Speaker
Biography:

Rana D P Singh is a distinguished Plant Breeder with over 26 years of experience in Sugarcane Research, has assumed the office of the Joint Director, Sugarcane Research Station, India in the year 2014. Previously, he has worked as Head, Division of Plant Breeding, Sugarcane Research Station, India. He has also served as Nodal Officer, RKVY and Project Incharge, AICRP on Sugarcane at Sugarcane Research Station, India. He has obtained his MSc (Agriculture) and PhD degrees in Genetics and Plant Breeding from Institute of Agricultural Sciences, Banaras Hindu University, India. He has developed 12 sugarcane varieties and among these, sugarcane varieties UP 05125 & CoSe 96234 are popular in sub-tropical India. He has several national and international publications to his credit.

Abstract:

Sugarcane is an important cash crop of sugar industry. It is generally grown in tropics; however its productivity depends on the varieties cultivated from different group, the agro-climatic conditions of the region and cultural practices followed. An improvement of sugarcane for sugar content increases sugar yield with only a small marginal increase in costs of production. This makes gains in sugar content economically more beneficial than corresponding increase in cane yield. However, comparison of cultivars released in different years indicate that sugarcane breeding programs have delivered increased sugar yields via improvement in cane yield with much smaller contributions from sugar content. This is contrary to what might be expected given that sugar content normally has moderate to high heritability and is not substantially affected by competition effects in small plots which should make for easy gains from selections. Research has identified for more effective ways of structuring breeding and selection programs. As it is now unthinkable to imagine running a breeding and selection program without access to a computer to generate plans and labels, keep records and analyze data. Equally, it would be difficult to run a selection program without the provision of commercial harvesters and mobile weighing equipment. Breeding for traits such as better quality content, yield, disease & pest resistance or alternative products is receiving increased attention. The question is that whether the genetic improvement realized nowadays can be sustained and what some part of the emerging technologies will play in the future. While genetic engineering and molecular markers are likely to be useful tools for the plant breeder, traditional plant breeding methods based on quantitative genetic theory will remain the major delivery system of improved varieties well into the future.

Manjusha Verma

ICAR-National Bureau of Plant Genetic Resources, India

Title: Leaf transcriptome sequencing for SSR development and linkage map construction in bottle gourd

Time : 16:50-17:10

Speaker
Biography:

Manjusha Verma is a Senior Scientist with an excellent experience in the emerging genomic technologies as well as their integration with the established methods for the understanding of genetic variation in horticultural crops especially cucurbitaceous crops. She has evaluated genetic variability based on morphological traits, biochemical and molecular markers in several horticultural crops and millets. She has developed thousands of microsatellite markers in bottle gourd, sponge gourd, watermelon and small millets with potential and demonstrated relevance to the analyses of genetic diversity, cultivar identification and marker assisted selection.

Abstract:

Despite the worldwide consumption and medicinal importance of bottle gourd (Lageneria siceraria) is not thoroughly investigated in molecular biology barring a few reports on genetic diversity analyses. Using high-throughput Illumina RNA sequencing, we analyzed a L. siceraria (variety Pusa Santushti) leaf transcriptome and 17.4 million clean reads were assembled into 19594 unigenes averaging 1195 bp. Among them, 18000 (91.8%) unigenes were annotated with a BLAST search against the NCBI Non-Redundant (NR) database and 2592 (13.3%) were detected that contained one or more simple sequence repeats (SSRs). From these SSR-containing sequences, 808 candidate SSR markers were developed and experimentally tested, validating (%) novel polymorphic SSR markers. Then, a consensus SSR-based linkage map was constructed with SSR markers distributed in 11 linkage groups. Both transcriptome information and the genetic map of L. siceraria presented here offer a valuable foundation for molecular biology investigations such as functional gene isolation, QTL mapping and marker-assisted selection breeding in this important vegetable species as well as related cucurbit crops.

Samarendra Das

ICAR-Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute, India

Title: Gene selection and co-expression modules detection common to various abiotic stress responses in rice and Arabidopsis

Time : 17:10-17:30

Speaker
Biography:

Samarendra Das has joined the Agricultural Research Service of ICAR in 2013. After completing the pre-requisite training programs, he has finally joined ICAR-Indian Agricultural Statistics Research Institute, New Delhi as a Scientist in October, 2013. Within the short period of time, he is being associated with three institute funded projects, as PI in two projects and Co-PI in one project. He has also published three research papers and also involved in teaching MSc and PhD students. His research interest lies in the field of Modeling of Gene Regulation, Gene Selection, etc.

Abstract:

Climate change is predicted to have a grave threat to crop growth due to the damaging effects resulting abiotic stresses like drought, heat, cold, salinity, etc., which might lead to catastrophic loss of crop productivity and may end up with a wide spread famine. Rice, being the major staple food crop for more than half of the world’s population is seriously affected by these abiotic stresses. Rice is simultaneously exposed to these multiple stresses, which brings various changes in molecular mechanisms governed within the cell. The identification and characterization of molecular components underlying to various stress response mechanism in rice, is of great interest to crop breeding in improving grain yield. In this study, meta-analysis was performed on four different abiotic stresses in rice and Arabidopsis by analyzing 446 micro-array samples pertained to various micro-array experiments. For the identification of stress responsive genes, a gene selection technique called Bootstrap-Maximum Relevance and Minimum Redundancy in conjunction with non-parametric statistical testing procedure has been proposed. The selected genes are then assessed by quantitative trait loci, gene ontology analysis. The gene co-expression modules as well as networks are constructed by using weighted gene co-expression network analysis technique for four abiotic stresses in both the plant species. For each stress, the hub genes presented in the network are identified by using a proposed technique called bootstrap gene co-expression analysis. Based on the hub genes, we also predicted the three-dimensional structures of some crucial proteins related to the abiotic stress response in rice for understanding the roles of these proteins in these networks. This computational study puts some new light on the mechanism of abiotic stress tolerance in rice.

Speaker
Biography:

Arti Goel has completed Master’s degree in Botany and Doctorate in Microbiology from Mohan Lal Sukhadia University, India and has completed Postdoctorate in Agricultural and Microbial Nanotechnology from Central Arid Zone Research Institute, India. Her research interests are as follows: Medicinal plants antimicrobial properties as well as synthesis, characterization and applications of microbially synthesized nanoparticles on agrosystem. Currently, she is working as an Assistant Professor at Amity Institute of Microbial Biotechnology, Amity University, India. Her research publications in this field include 12 papers in reputed journals, 14 scientific articles, two patents. She is serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute journals. She is also a Managing Editor of a scientific magazine entitled “Bioevolution” of Gyandhara Academic International Publications, India.

Abstract:

Primary healthcare systems involve use of medicinal plants as an effective source of both traditional and modern medicines. Any plant which possesses curative elements or properties in one or more of its organs may be termed as medicinal plant. Plant based medicaments have been employed since the dawn of civilization for prolonging the life of man and for combating various ailments. World Health Organization (WHO) also advocates use of traditional medicines as safe remedies for ailments of both microbial and non-microbial origins. According to ‘WHO’ more than one billion people rely on herbal medicines to some extent. 21,000 plants all around the world have been listed for their medicinal uses and it has been estimated that as many as 80 percent of the world’s population depends on plants for their primary healthcare needs. Plants used for traditional medicine contain a wide range of substances that can be used to treat chronic as well as infectious diseases. Medicinal value of plants depends on these inherent substances that produce a definite physiological action on the human body.

Ramajayam D

ICAR-Indian Institute of Oil Palm Research, India

Title: Identification of polymorphic microsatellite markers in oil palm

Time : 17:50-18:10

Speaker
Biography:

Ramajayam D has completed his PhD in Pomology from ICAR-Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi and a foreign deputation training on Marker Assisted Selection (MAS) from West Virginia State University, USA. He is the Senior Scientist (Fruit Science) of ICAR-Indian Institute of Oil Palm Research under Indian Council of Agricultural Research, New Delhi. He has published more than 12 papers in reputed journals and currently working on germplasm conservation, genetic enhancement, tissue culture and marker assisted selection in oil palm. He has life membership in 9 reputed scientific societies including the life membership from The International Society for Oil Palm Breeders (ISOPB), Malaysia.

Abstract:

The oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) comparatively a new crop to India, is the most productive oil crop in the world, yielding an average of 4 to 6 tons of oil per ha per year. The narrowness of gene pool is considered as a major obstacle to increase the productivity as the oil palm planting materials are presently derived from an extremely narrow genetic base. The inadequacy of genetic variability necessitates the requirement for germplasm material of specific characteristics for incorporation into existing breeding programs. Among various molecular biology techniques, microsatellite markers are used extensively to carry out studies on genetic diversity, varietal identification, pedigree analysis, genome mapping and Quantitative Trait Locus (QTL) detection for molecular marker assisted selection in oil palm. Simple Sequence Repeats (SSRs) have great advantage over other markers such as isozymes, Random Amplified Polymorphic DNA (RAPD), Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP), Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) with highest polymorphism information content (PIC) and high distribution of loci within the genome. Additionally, they are co-dominant and highly reproducible through PCR. This study assessed 52 SSRs in eight oil palm types representing dura, tenera and pisifera in order to find polymorphic SSRs which could possibly be used for ascertaining the genetic differences and or similarities among them. The following 11 SSRs namely mEgCIR3750, mEgCIR0905, mEgCIR3260, mEgCIR3301, mEgCIR3698, mEgCIR3439, mEgCIR3716, mEgCIR3788, mEgCIR1713, mEgCIR2380 and mEgCIR3402 were found to be polymorphic which will be very useful in various applications of oil palm breeding programs like genetic diversity studies, linkage map and QTL analysis.

Speaker
Biography:

Tushar Kanti Dutta has completed his PhD under the joint venture of Rothamsted Research, UK and Indian Agricultural Research Institute, New Delhi. He is currently working as a Scientist at IARI on molecular basis of plant-nematode interaction. He has published a couple of papers in internationally reputed journals.

Abstract:

Plant-parasitic, root-knot nematodes (Meloidogyne spp.) are arguably the most damaging genus of biotrophic pests of vascular plants and thus have a major impact on global agricultural production. Due to the changing climate and agricultural practices RKNs are becoming a menace in newer crops and geographical localities. Currently available management practices have failed to contain the problem; hence, there is a critical need to develop environmentally-friendly and smart approaches tailor-made to reduce the nematode disease burden in Indian agriculture. Utility of host-delivered RNAi has been demonstrated in several plants (Arabidopsis, tobacco and soybean) that exhibited resistance against root-knot and cyst nematodes. In the present study, a M. incognita-specific protease gene, cathepsin L cysteine proteinase (Mi-cpl-1) was targeted to generate tomato transgenic lines to evaluate the genetically modified nematode resistance. In vitro knockdown of Mi-cpl-1 gene led to the reduced attraction and penetration of M. incognita in tomato suggesting the involvement of Mi-cpl-1 in nematode parasitism. Transgenic expression of the dsRNA of Mi-cpl-1 gene resulted in 60-80% reduction in infection and multiplication of M. incognita in tomato. Evidence for in vitro and in planta silencing of Mi-cpl-1 was confirmed by expression analysis using quantitative RT-PCR. Our study demonstrates that Mi-cpl-1 plays crucial role during plant-nematode interaction and plant-mediated down regulation of this gene elicits detrimental effect on M. incognita development, reinforcing the potential of RNAi technology for management of phytonematodes in crop plants. The findings of the present study lead to the better understanding of the mechanism of nematode parasitism which ultimately helps in designing smarter nematode management options.

  • Track 2: Biotechnology in Health Care
Location: Hall-2

Session Introduction

Pravir Kumar

Delhi Technological University, India

Title: Therapeutic relevance of ubiquitin E3 ligase, chaperones and bioflavonoids in neurodegenerative disorders

Time : 11:00-11:20

Speaker
Biography:

Pravir Kumar is an Associate Professor in the Department of Biotechnology at DTU. He has obtained MS degree from BHU, Varanasi and PhD degree from Germany in Cardiovascular Physiology. Before returning to India, he has spent several years in the Neurology Department at Tufts University School of Medicine, USA as a Postdoctoral Fellow and later held Faculty Position. Still, he is holding an Adjunct Faculty status in the Neurology Department at Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM). His areas of research interest and expertise include molecular chaperone and ubiquitin E3 ligase in neurodegenerative disorders along with aberrant cell cycle re-entries into aged neurons and muscles. He is an Editorial Board Member in Journal of Alzheimer’s disease (IOS press, commencing from Jan 01/2015), International Journal of Neurology Research, American Journal of Research Communication and Reviewer of several leading Elsevier journals. He has published 37 papers in peer-reviewed journals (Scopus h-index-10; cumulative impact factors: 90; citation index is 925). He has successfully completed LSRB-DRDO funded research defense project on hypoxia induced neurodegeneration in India.

Abstract:

Intracellular accumulation of Aβ42 is an early event in the pathogenesis cascade of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) causing in neuronal dysfunction, synaptic and neuronal loss together with dementia. A bifunctional protein C-terminus Hsp70 interactive protein (CHIP) is considered as a connecting link between molecular chaperones and Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) while another E3 ligase Parkin targets several proteins for UPS degradation. Further Parkin's mutations are the major cause of autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease (ARPD) where Parkin catalyzes the post-translational modification of proteins with polyubiquitin targeting them to the 26S proteasome. In addition, Parkin together with CHIP reduces intracellular Aβ1-42 peptide levels, an important peptide that shares a cross talk between Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. These ligases counteract its effects on cell death and reverse its effect to inhibit the proteasome. Herein, we reported the implication of CHIP and Parkin in the metabolism of β-amyloid precursor proteins (βAPP) and its derivative β-amyloid. We also proved a strong interaction between β-APP, CHIP and HSPs. Interestingly CHIP also promotes the association of ubiquitin with β-APP in proteasomal dependent manner. CHIP together with another Parkin enhances the Aβ degradation and eliciting neuro protective properties while Parkin alone consider as an inducers of amyloid clearance, a cryoprotectant and in the suppression of reactive inflammation. Furthermore, we have shown the effect of bioflavonoid in the attenuation of hypoxia and neurotoxin induced neurodegeneration in the rat model.

Bina Pani Das

National Centre for Disease Control, India

Title: New microbial insecticide for mosquito vectors of human diseases: A discovery by accident

Time : 11:20-11:40

Speaker
Biography:

Bina Pani Das completed her PhD from Delhi University. She is a Medical Entomologist worked with premier organization, National Centre for Disease Control (1985-2007) and with Jamia Millia Islamia University till 2012. She has published 4 books and over 20 papers in national & international journals, her recent book being “Mosquito Vectors of Japanese Encephalitis Virus from Northern India” by Springer in 2012. She is the inventor of a patent entitled “Microbial Control Agent for Mosquito Vectors of Human Diseases” granted by six countries including USA, and Australia.

Abstract:

Microbial insecticides are microscopic living organisms (viruses, bacteria, fungi, protozoa or nematodes) or the toxins produced by these organisms. During mosquito larval survey (1999), protozoan (Chilodonella uncinata), a facultative parasite was accidentally discovered killing mosquito larvae growing in paddy fields in Sonepat District, Haryana state of India. Subsequent follow up studies resulted in preparation of a semi-dry formulation (microbial control agent) wherein the parasite remains inactivated but gets reactivated within 24 hours when released in water. Ch. uncinata has many properties of a good biological control agent for mosquito vectors of human diseases including malaria and dengue viz., easily produced, robust, tolerant to desiccation, facility to recycle in environment, trans-ovarian transmission, induce blood feeding inhibition in infected adults mosquitoes, and not harmful to larvivorous fish. National and international patents were filed during 2001-02 on “A Microbial Control Agent for Mosquito Vectors of Human Diseases”. So far, six countries have granted this patent including USA and Australia. Subsequently (2010-12), Ch. uncinata BP 610 strain updated at the Jamia Millia Islamia University, New Delhi was deposited with the international depository authority-American type culture collection, USA. The formulation made out of Ch. uncinata BP 610 has a shelf life of >18 months. Using an already present, non-genetically modified organism that can survive unfavourable conditions to combat the mosquito menace is a very different and novel approach from the conventional methods. Another advantage of using such a formulation that has great utility as well as can be stored and transported relatively easily.

Samit K. Nandi

West Bengal University of Animal & Fishery Sciences, India

Title: Metallic ion doped calcium phosphate based scaffolds, bioactive glass and cements in bone regeneration

Time : 11:40-12:00

Speaker
Biography:

Samit Kumar Nandi, an Associate Professor and Former Head, Department of Veterinary Surgery & Radiology, West Bengal University of Animal and Fishery Sciences, India has completed his PhD from the same University for which he was conferred Jawaharlal Nehru Award by ICAR, Government of India. Further for his contribution to Material Science, he has been awarded the outstanding National Bioscience Award for Career Development 2008, CSIR Technology Award 2010 from Government of India. He has also been conferred Biotech Product and Process Development and Commercialization Award 2013 from his Excellency, President of India. He is a Prolific Writer and has contributed more than 100 scientific articles in national and international journals of repute and is serving as Reviewer of number of journals all over the Globe. He has presented several invited lectures in international conferences in India including China, Singapore, Finland, USA and Thailand.

Abstract:

Functional management of fracture non-unions, bone loss associated with trauma, cancer and revision total joint arthroplasty and osteomyelitis remain a significant challenge in the field of orthopaedic surgery. Biomaterials for bone regeneration represent a major attention of orthopedic research. Addition of dopants in biomaterial has appeared as a crucial regulator of bone formation and bone regeneration due to their significant role in the biological processes. Keeping view this in consideration, metallic ion (zinc, strontium, silicon, magnesium, lithium) doped calcium phosphate and glass based scaffold and cements were synthesized in laboratory and after fabricating different porous struts made of these materials and thorough in vitro characterization, these have been used in experimental animal model. Primary bioactivity study of the bare scaffolds was carried out using simulated body fluid (SBF) study. Bone formation over two time points were assessed using fluorescence microscopy, histological analysis, chronological radiology, scanning electron microscopy and micro-computed tomography in rabbit bone defect model. Similarly metallic ion doped brushite cements (BrCs) alone and in combination with insulin like growth factor 1(IGF-1) were also studied in animal bone defect model of same time points. Our findings suggest that addition of dopants alters the physico-mechanical properties of biomaterials and promotes the early stage in vivo osseointegration and bone remodeling that may pave the new insight in bone tissue engineering. Moreover, addition of IGF-1 further improved the performance of cements (BrCs) in terms of bone regeneration in animal model.

Speaker
Biography:

Geeta Shroff, the Founder of Nutech Mediworld, New Delhi, India has developed hESCs therapy. She is a Graduate in Medicine from the University of Delhi and her Post-graduation is in Gynecology & Obstetrics. Since 2002, more than 1300 patients suffering from various incurable conditions have been treated using hESCs. She has presented her work at various national and international forums. She has recently published several studies on the use of hESC therapy in the treatment of patients with cortico visual impairment, cerebral palsy, spinal cord injury, Lyme disease, Friedrich ataxia, Duchenne muscular dystrophy and spinocerebellar ataxia. She envisions making hESC therapy available globally for many of mankind’s worst afflictions.

Abstract:

Spinal cord injury (SCI), a neurological injury is associated with permanent disability and decreased life expectancy. Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) hold potential for differentiation and can provide neuronal or glial cells. The present study evaluated efficacy and safety of hESC in patients with SCI. This was a retrospective study conducted in patients with SCI treated with hESC therapy. Patients entered the first treatment phase (T1, 8-Week for paraplegics and 12-weeks for quadriplegics) where 0.25 mL (<4 million cells) hESCs were administered intramuscularly twice daily, 1 mL (<16 million cells) every 10 days intravenously and 1 to 5 ml (depending on the route of administration) every 7 days through supplemental routes (intrathecal, epidural, caudal, brachial plexus block, popliteal block or deep spinal muscle). After 4-8 months (gap period), patients entered second and third treatment phases (T2 and T3). Patients also received physiotherapy and or occupational therapy. A total of 226 patients [quadriplegic patients (90), paraplegic patients (136)] were analyzed. Of 153 patients in ASIA scale A at beginning of T1, 80 (52.3%) moved to lower scales (scale B-15%, scale C-37.3%) at the end of T1. Of 32 patients in ASIA scale A before T2, 12 (37.5%) moved to scale B by the end of T2. Of 19 patients at start of T3, 8 were in ASIA scale A; 3 (37.5%) moved to scale B at the end of T3. No death or SAE were observed. The hESC transplantation in SCI is safe and effective and improves clinical condition of patients.

Swati Checker

MGM College of Engineering & Technology, India

Title: Android based cholesterol detection technology

Time : 12:20-12:40

Speaker
Biography:

Swati Checker has completed her PhD from Indian Institute of Technology Bombay and currently working as an Associate Professor in Department of Biomedical Engineering at MGM College of Engineering and Technology, India. She has published 8 papers in reputed journals, attended 4 international conferences and has been part of a national workshop on biosignals acquisition and processing at MGMCET. She has been awarded first prize to ‘Urea Biosensor’ proposal by Intellectual Ventures in 2009. She has been Mentor to a students in Kishore Vaigyanic Protsahan Yojna (KVPY) organized by IIT Bombay (June 2009), a scheme of national science fellowship to students interested in research careers. She has represented India under the Indo-UK Young Entrepreneur Scheme (YES) in October 2007 at Oxford, UK for business plan competition as part of a five member team from IITB, Mumbai.

Abstract:

Regular cholesterol tracking has always been a challenging issue for heart patients, since; existing clinical technique requires at least 14 hours of fasting along with 1-2 days for result evaluation. In this work, we have presented an approach to measure cholesterol level without any prior fasting. Unlike traditional method of cholesterol testing, the proposed method will be fast along with providing reasonable adequate results. The project aims at delivering an effective technique to identify cholesterol levels in an individual using mobile technology so as to prevent number of increasing heart disease. The main purpose of this project is to create simple, compact assembly as a supporting base for the developed cholesterol strip and relevant steps will be taken to transfer the acquire image into mobile’s memory. An app will run in mobile phone to quantify the cholesterol in developed strip to get required outcome. This reagent strip contains serum sample for cholesterol analysis. An enzymatic reaction converts total cholesterol and HDL cholesterol to choles-4en-3-one and hydrogen peroxide. The peroxide then reacts with disubstituted aniline to form quinoeimine dyes. The system can quantify cholesterol levels from colorimetric changes due to cholesterol reacting enzymatically on a dry reagent test strip. Further a smartphone application has been developed for the android iOS platform that in combination with the smart CARD accessory allows for image acquisition and colorimetric analysis of the cholesterol enzymatic reaction. When the user presses “analyze” on the app, an image of the colorimetric color changes is acquired through the phone camera.

Maneesha Pande

Indian Institute of Technology (Delhi), India

Title: Pitfalls to beware in in vitro release studies
Speaker
Biography:

Maneesha Pande has a Master’s degree in Pharmaceutics and Pharmaceutical Technology from Gujarat University, India. She has about 12 years of industrial and teaching experience and is presently pursuing Doctoral studies at the Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India.

Abstract:

In vitro drug release study is an important procedure that is employed by researchers to assess whether the formulation developed by them and or the processing carried out with respect to the active medicinal components are capable of releasing the drug in sufficient quantities and over a desired time period. This study also serves as a tool to compare different formulations. The official compendia give elaborate protocols for the test which is mandatory for all approved and marketed pharmaceutical products. At the research level, however, as the research formulations are usually un-conventional, the apparatus and procedures followed for this study are tailor-made to adapt to the specific formulation under examination. It is therefore important that all factors and parameters that can affect the drug release specifically those that affect mass-transfer are carefully addressed during the development of the protocols. The present work shows how one such parameter- the dialysis membrane commonly used to retain the drug formulation can adversely affect the release of the drug enclosed within it and give erroneous results with respect to the release of the drug. Other factors and parameters which are extremely important and therefore should be given due consideration have also been discussed.

Palok Aich

National Institute of Science Education and Research, India

Title: Post-genomic integrative approaches to understand psychological stress

Time : 13:50-14:10

Speaker
Biography:

Palok Aich is a physical biochemist turned molecular and systems biologist. His research interests are stress, gut microbiome and innate mucosal immunity. Following his PhD in Biophysics, he joined Stockholm University and Karolinska Institute, Sweden for his 1st PDF and the second one in University of Saskatchewan, Canada. He then joined a pharmaceutical industry in Canada as a group leader of bio-imaging followed by a position in VIDO, Canada as a Scientist. He joined NISER as Associate Professor (G) in 2009. He was the first Chairperson of School of Biological Sciences and currently as FIC/Dean of International and Estate.

Abstract:

Post genomic development in biology has revolutionized how we approach to understand complex biological problems. Modern approaches are more integrative and are able to handle larger sample size to infer conclusion with more confidence. Understanding etiology of a disease and establish intervention are also more challenging nowadays than before, simply because the environment is more complex. This complex environment leads to more stress in the life of an individual. It is, therefore, important to develop means to understand the correlation between stress and disease as well as to be able to predict stress dependent disease susceptibility. We began our journey by attempting to understand bovine respiratory disease (BRD) in cattle model. We established integrative systems biology approach to understand and quantify psychological stress and its relation to BRD. Fatal BRD is frequently the result of a primary viral and a secondary bacterial respiratory infection. In cattle, BRD causes more than half of feedlot deaths and has a major impact on financial losses in the cattle industry in North America. It is, therefore, very important to understand the mechanism of this complex disease process as well to predict and identify BRD susceptible cattle to enhance treatment efficacy. We established the value of using combinatorial omics approaches to identify candidate biomarkers associated with stress responses, a factor that can increase the severity of BRD. Using proteomic, metabonomic and elemental analyses of serum samples we also established that multi-method analysis could discriminate between the complex biological responses to secondary bacterial respiratory infection and predict disease outcome. We have further correlated stress with major physiological processes in humans and other animals to understand the genome-wide association of stress with various diseases. Significance of the results from our studies in terms of future health research will be discussed.

Girija Shankar Shukla

Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology & Sciences, India

Title: Comparative efficacy of homoeopathy, cognitive behavior therapy and placebo on depression

Time : 14:10-14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences (SHIATS)-Deemed University, Allahabad, India Department of Pharmacology, Faculty of Pharmacy, Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India.Faculty of Health Sciences, Sam Higginbottom Institute of Agriculture, Technology and Sciences (SHIATS)-Deemed University, Allahabad, India.Department of Pharmacology, Hamdard Institute of Medical Sciences and Research (HIMSR), Jamia Hamdard, New Delhi, India.

Abstract:

Depression produces serious emotional and psychological disorders and has severe consequences if not managed at proper time. With the progression of emotional load of depression one is unable to cope up with the extreme negative feelings and tend to create the world of their own thoughts which may end with the end of their life. Whatever forms of symptoms may be related to the grief, depression is far different from normal sadness in that it engulfs our day-to-day life interfering with ability to work, study, eat, sleep and having fun. World Health Organization (Mental Health and Substance Abuse; Facts & Figures) reported that 15% of depressed persons end their lives in the form of suicide at younger age. Tendency of developing suicidal behavior among the depressed persons is very lethal entangled condition. People who have an impulsive desire to die or perceive suicidal thoughts are very risky. Simultaneously there are many depressed persons who do not have suicidal plan but they prefer to die through some sudden severely fatal medically induced diseases. The present research study explains the comparison between the homeopathic, cognitive behavior therapy and placebo on depression.

Monidipa Ghosh

National Institute of Technology Durgapur, India

Title: Analyzing Leishmania donovani gene ontology leading to novel drug targets

Time : 14:30-14:50

Speaker
Biography:

Monidipa Ghosh has completed her PhD from Jadavpur University and Postdoctoral studies from Institute of Chemical Biology, Kolkata. She is the Assistant Professor of Department of Biotechnology, National Institute of Technology Durgapur, a premier National Institute. She has published more than 12 papers in reputed journals and has more than 12 years research experience. She has been awarded as Young Investigator Award by European Macrophage and Dendritic Cell Society in University of Leister, UK. She is associated with NIT Durgapur since 2010.

Abstract:

Visceral Leishmaniasis, caused by the kinetoplastid protozoan L. donovani is the most fatal form of leishmaniasis affecting millions around the world. Molecular level study of L. donovani in comparison to other leishmanial species is unexplored so far. In the current study, we present the complete scanning of L. donovani genome revealing its interspecies variations. The total 8032 genes encoding proteins from L. donovani with the total of other four sequenced Leishmania species are compared. Here the comparative proteome analysis of L. donovani with the other sequenced leishmanial species is reported. Despite extreme conservation between the genomes of leishmanial species, we identified 57 species specific genes including few genes which encode the hypothetical proteins of Leishmania donovani which may play a significant role in pathogenesis which needs further experimental investigations. In addition we hypothesize the involvement and possible molecular mechanism of one specific L. donovani protein, in parasite invasion and pathogenesis. Further genes of L. donovani which are conserved only in certain species and the genes which encode repetitive proteins are detailed which may augment the understanding of pathogenesis of L. donovani in human host. Also Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) analysis was carried out for the most significant A2 genes which has established role in visceral leishmaniasis to drive the determination of role of evolution in Leishmanial species. This study therefore frameworks experimental verification of few significant genes, consistent with independent existence, to set an avenue of genomic aspect of drug targeting to overcome the current problems in an effective way. Some combinatorial effect of cholesterol-lowering drug statin and a micronutrient chromium chloride hexahydrate is also examined as a novel anti-leishmanial therapeutic agent.

Kiran Singh

Banaras Hindu University(IIT), India

Title: Impairment of diabetic wound healing: Key genetic players

Time : 14:50-15:10

Speaker
Biography:

Kiran Singh has completed her PhD from Cytogenetics Laboratory, Department of Zoology; Banaras Hindu University in 2005. She is currently working as an Assistant Professor in Department of Molecular and Human Genetics, Banaras Hindu University. Her area of interest includes molecular human reproductive genetics, clinical cytogenetics & genetics and epigenetics of diabetic wound healing impairment. She has published 48 papers in various national and international journals and has been serving as Reviewer and Editorial Board Member of various reputed journals.

Abstract:

Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a multifactorial disease characterized by hyperglycaemia and a series of micro- and macro-vascular secondary complications including wound healing impairment. Acute inflammation is necessary for wound healing as it brings about proper wound debridement. During the inflammatory phase of wound healing, innate immune system activation is crucial to combat invading microbes. Toll like receptors (TLRs) are the important members of innate immune system and are shown to be an important regulator of wound repair and regeneration in mouse model. We observed differential expression of extracellular TLRs in human diabetic wounds. Epigenetic silencing mediated by methylation analysis of CpGs of promoter regions of TLR2 and TLR4 revealed that this mechanism is contributing towards the down-regulation of TLR2 and TLR4. Some endosomal TLRs like TLR7 and TLR9 have been shown to promote tissue necrosis and sensory neuropathy. The levels of these endosomal TLRs were found to be significantly elevated in diabetic wounds along with their signalling molecules like S100A8 and IL8.Recruitment of anti-inflammatory CD11b+CD33+ myeloid cells during initial phase of wound healing is necessary for proper healing. Comparative analysis of the counts of these CD11b+ CD33+ myeloid cells using flow cytometry in healthy controls, T2DM cases and Diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) cases revealed the reduced level of these cells to be involved in the impairment of wound healing. In conclusion, our study indicated that the combined genetic and epigenetic deregulation of immuno-inflammatory phase due to persistent hyperglycaemia lead to development of chronic ulcers in T2DM subjects.

Speaker
Biography:

Savita Chaurasia has completed her PhD in Medicinal Chemistry from Banaras Hindu University. She is a Professor of Biotechnology at IMS Engineering College, Ghaziabad. She has been serving as Editor-in-Chief of Vivechan International Journal of Research and has been serving as Associate Editor of Advances in Natural and Applied Sciences. She has been Member of RDC for Biotechnology/Bioinformatics of UP Technical University. She has been working towards the development of indigenous drugs of natural origin and application of these natural products as experimental medicines against various physiological and environmental challenges with an approach to their mechanism of action.

Abstract:

Recent development in medicinal field reports a number of disease associated with free radicals. Antioxidants are the substances which can scavenge free radicals and help to decrease the incidence of oxidative stress induced damage. Therefore, present study was focused in search of natural antioxidants. For the study, methanolic extracts of Elettaria cardamomum (EA) and Ferula assa-foetida (FA) were evaluated for antioxidant potential using TAC assay and reducing power assay. Both the extracts showed antioxidant property and it was 25.60 mg/ml and 18.43 mg/ml ascorbic acid equivalents for ET and FA respectively. Reducing power of FA (82.55%) was higher than EC (54.0%). The results of phytochemical screening confirmed the presence of phenolics, alkaloids, flavonoids and saponin. TLC and HPLC were carried out to further analyze these phytoconstituents. Total phenolic and flavonoid content was determined using gallic acid and quercetin as standard. Free radical scavenging activity was evaluated using superoxide, hydroxyl radical scavenging and H2O2 decomposition assays. At a dose 500 µg/ml FA and EC showed 82.55% and 54.0% scavenging of superoxide; 44.95% and 33.94% scavenging of hydroxyl; 22.34% and 17.65% decomposition of hydrogen peroxide respectively. Efforts were also made to study the effect on lipid peroxidation and DNA damage-induced by hydroxyl radical using plasmid relaxation assay. EC and FA extracts significantly inhibited lipid peroxidation in a dose dependent manner and also prevented DNA damage. All the results were compared with standard antioxidants. Both extracts showed promising antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity, thus may be explored as therapeutic agents for oxidative stress borne diseases in future.

Arumugam Sangaran

Tamil Nadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University, India

Title: Molecular epidemiology of zoonotic parasites: Need of the hour

Time : 15:30-15:50

Speaker
Biography:

Arumugam Sangaran has completed his PhD from Tamil Nadu Veterinary and Animal Sciences University. He is currently working as a Professor at Madras Veterinary College, a premier Veterinary Institution in South East Asia. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and also received several awards. He has been continuously doing his research focusing on parasitic zoonoses more particularly on cystic echinococcosis.

Abstract:

Molecular tools have become an integral part of studying the epidemiology of various infectious agents. Molecular biology provides one of the many diagnostic tools that can be utilized to strengthen understanding of the epidemiology of a disease. Molecular epidemiology is the application of molecular genetics technique to the dynamics of disease in a population. A range of new molecular tools have been developed in recent years for identification of parasites through molecular assays. With regard to parasites, the primary application of molecular epidemiology is to give a specific and sensitive identification of parasites so as to resolve taxonomic issues going below the species level. Many of such studies have given a new insight on transmission pattern of parasites more particularly with relevant to zoonotic transmission as well as on prevalence and importance of mixed infections with different parasite species or intra-specific variance. Such study has increased the understanding of the pathogenicity, virulence and host parasite relationship of the etiological agent, provided information on the genetic structure, taxonomy of the parasite and has allowed zoonotic potential of the previously unidentified agents to be determined.

Sumit Mitra

Molbio Diagnostics Pvt. Ltd, India

Title: Biotechnology in disease diagnosis: Meeting the needs of a changing world

Time : 16:30-16:50

Speaker
Biography:

Sumit Mitra has completed his Graduate degree in Organic Chemistry from St. Edmund’s College, Shillong and then completed his Master’s degree in Biochemistry from North East Hill University. His special subject was Biological Nitrogen Fixation under tutelage of Professor Amar Nath Rai, while also being extremely interested in basic Immunology. Soon after, he has joined the Indian In Vitro Diagnostic (IVD) industry and has served as an Application & Training Specialist in the fields of Clinical Chemistry, Immunoassays and Infectious Disease Diagnostics. With over two decades of experience in different roles in sales and marketing across diverse product portfolios, he is currently the Head of Global Business for Molbio Diagnostics, a JV between Tulip Group from Goa and Bigtec Laboratories in Bengaluru that seeks to change paradigms within the Molecular Diagnostic Landscape.

Abstract:

For too long, poor case detection has continued to remain a major health care problem, resulting in a huge burden to both the patient (tremendous overtreatment/under treatment) & society, (huge implications of cost and drug resistance). Conventional testing methodologies for a variety of infectious and communicable diseases based on so called “Gold Standard” but grossly inadequate platforms have only added to the patient’s misfortune. Also the fact that to even take advantage of such existing tests a patient has to necessarily travel long distances to tertiary level centers to give his/her sample for testing and then undergo an agonizing wait for the results of the tests to be known and then for the treatment to get started. Currently MDx (Molecular Diagnostic) platforms using the real time PCR principles, considered most sensitive and specific, while promising greatly improved delivery of patient care through expedited diagnosis, improved treatment efficacy, have as a matter of fact neither delivered nor met the expectations of “quantum leap in laboratory testing standards”. Various complexities and short comings have led to the miniscule use of such a unique technology for the betterment of global healthcare settings.

Speaker
Biography:

Anil Kumar Megavarnam has received his Master’s degree in Microbiology from Bangalore University. He is currently working as a Research Scholar in Bangalore University, Department of Microbiology under UGC-BSR Fellowship. He has published 4 research papers. His research is focused on Enzyme Technology and Microbial Biotechnology.

Abstract:

Three hundred and sixty tropical soil fungi were screened for L-asparaginase production by dye based rapid screening method. A species of Fusarium showed appreciable amount of enzyme activity and identified as Fusarium culmorum by 18s rRNA sequencing. Optimization studies under submerged fermentation (SmF) revealed that production of enzyme was maximum at day 4, pH 7.5, temperature 30° C and at 1% substrate concentration. Addition of 0.2% citric acid, 0.5% ammonium chloride, 0.002% calcium chloride enhanced the production by 6 fold. The enzyme was purified to homogeneity by ion exchange followed by gel filtration chromatography to 14.03 fold with a specific activity of 16.66 U/mg of protein with 2.6% yield. The molecular mass was 90 kDa. The optimal pH and temperature of purified enzyme was 8.0 and 40° C. The enzyme retained 90% of activity at pH-8 upto72 hours and 50% activity at 60° C for 60 min. The Km and Vmax of purified enzyme was 3.57 mM and 0.5 μ mol/ml/min. It was activated by Mn2+ and Tween-80, inhibited by Cu2+ and EDTA. Production of L-asparaginase was also carried out under solid state fermentation (SSF). Sixty different solid substrates were used among which, soya bean meal in combination with wheat bran and 0.1% ammonium chloride enhanced the production by 14 fold. The purified L-asparaginase showed cytotoxic effect on human leukemic cell line (Jurkat) with IC50 value 90 μg/ml. The enzyme did not elicit any immunogenic effects on human lymphocytes. The enzyme induced apoptotic cell death by arresting the growth of cells at G2-M phase.

Speaker
Biography:

Tulika Mishra has completed her PhD from Utkal University, Bhubaneswar, Odisha in the year 2014. She has secured First Position in Graduation and Post graduation levels at St. Joseph’s College for Women, Gorakhpur. She has published 6 papers in reputed journals and contributed two chapters in a book titled “Botanical Therapeutics and Challenges of Twenty First Century”. She is also the Chief Editor of College Magazine “Dastak”.

Abstract:

Plant secondary metabolites are unique source for pharmaceuticals, food additives, flavors and industrially important bio-chemicals. Environmental factors viz., temperature, humidity, light intensity, water, minerals, and CO2 influence the growth of a plant and secondary metabolite production. Climate change is causing noticeable effects on the life cycles and distribution of the world’s vegetation including wild medicinal plants. These metabolites have shown potential in treating various ailments as these plant based drugs would be cost effective due to its abundance and temperamentally quite suiting to millions of our masses, as these plants and their remedies are in use from ancient times. However, the effects of climate change on secondary metabolites in plants are not well understood. A need for research to improve our understanding of climatic effects on medicinal plants is stressed in the present article. An attempt is being made here to review the influence of abiotic factors like elevated CO2 levels/green house gases and future strategies for research on secondary metabolite production. The research on medicinal plants with respect to climate change is very sporadic and insignificant in comparison with other commercial crops. These groups of plants should not be left as they are potential sources of bio-molecules and nutraceuticals.

Speaker
Biography:

Arnab Mahato is currently working as a Senior Research Fellow in CSIR-CGCRI, Kolkata. He has completed his Post graduation in Chemistry from NIT Rourkela and his Graduation from Calcutta University. He is currently working on in vitro approach of hydroxyapatite coated non-metallic craniofacial implants.

Abstract:

Large segmental defects resulting from trauma, surgical excision or cranioplasty have complex 3D structural needs which are difficult to restore. To overcome these concerns several alloplastic materials including metals, plastic, ceramics and composites are used for the reconstruction of skull bone defects with limited success. To overcome the problems, a biocompatible and osteo-conductive FRC (fiber reinforced composite) implant using e-glass as a base has been proposed. As a first step of this process, nano-porous hydroxyapatite (HAp) was coated on e-glass substrate which obviates leaching of base glass network former/modifier and bio-inertness on surface and necessitates bone bonding/soft tissue bonding at the surface to functionally restore at implanted site. In a nutshell, Ca-P sol was synthesized and applied on inert e-glass substrate by freeze-drying method and after calcination (850-950o C); nano-porous HAp coating was developed. After thorough material characterization including XRD, FTIR, Raman, FESEM, TEM, MTT assay and nano-mechanical tests, the composite was tested for in vitro static and quasi-dynamic bioactivity in contact with SBF (simulated body fluid) up to 7 and 14 days at 37.4o C. Same set of characterizing parameters were studied subsequently. It was found that non-cytotoxic crystalline HAp with ~10 μm coating thickness and fairly high bonding strength was obtained on the substrate with pores around 300-500 nm throughout and with cellular like microstructure on the surface of e-glass which was again very suitable for tissue in-growth and bone-bonding ability. For as-prepared coated substrates, TEM results revealed graded amorphicity from substrate to periphery and deposition of flaky Ca-P crystals after 14 days of both static and quasi-dynamic SBF bioactivity study. Nano-indentation at 1 mN load showed significant increase of hardness after SBF study. Cell viability test through MTT assay using fibroblast (L-929) and osteoblast (MG-63, osteosarcoma) cell-line showed non-toxicity of the composite. SEM image after cytotoxicity test showed enormous cell-proliferation on the surface of the samples after 7 days. These results thus showed a very promising application as a new biomaterial for repair and reconstruction by bone tissue engineering application.

Speaker
Biography:

Sonal Gupta has completed her PhD in 2013 from International Centre for Genetic Engineering and Biotechnology (ICGEB), New Delhi, India and continued working as Research Associate for about 1.5 years. She is currently working as UGC Postdoctoral Fellow at Shiv Nadar University. Her current project focuses on elucidating signaling pathways in infectious disease like malaria and finding new drug targets against malaria. Her research interest focuses on understanding the role of secondary messengers and downstream effector molecules in parasite growth and invasion. Her current findings in this project have been recently published in Systems and Synthetic Biology Journal (Springer).

Abstract:

Serpentine receptors with G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) like seven transmembrane (7 TM) topology are identified in Plasmodium. A class of 7 TM receptors known as purinergic receptors binds to purines such as ADP, ATP and UTP and mediates important physiological functions including regulation of calcium signaling. Here we performed in silico analysis of P. falciparum serpentine receptors and found that one of the P. falciparum serpentine receptors, PfSR12 possess nucleotide binding consensus P-loop sequence in addition to seven transmembrane domains. The presence of conserved seven transmembrane domains and a consensus nucleotide binding sequence (P-loop) suggest that PfSR12 is a putative purinergic receptor. On further analysis using docking programs, we found four active binding residues Asn149, Lys150, Asn151 and Gly152 in P-loop of PfSR12, interact with ATP. This work gives insights into the interactions between putative purinergic receptor PfSR12 and its ligand ATP which can be explored in structure based drug designing against malaria.

Vinita Khot

Interactive Research School for Health Affairs, India

Title: Reduced methylation potential in preterm pregnancies: implication for epigenetic programming of the offspring

Time : 17:50-18:05

Speaker
Biography:

Vinita Khot has completed her BSc (Life Sciences) in 2009 from RTMNU, MSc (Biotechnology) in 2011 from Bharati Vidyapeeth University and she is currently pursuing PhD in Biotechnology, Department of Nutritional Medicine, Bharati Vidyapeeth University, India under the guidance of Dr. Sadhana Joshi. She has been awarded the Indian Council of Medical Research-Senior Research Fellowship (ICMRSRF) since April 2014 and has 3 papers published in international journals.

Abstract:

Children born preterm are reported to be at increased risk of developing non communicable diseases in later life. Changes in placental DNA methylation patterns are implicated in fetal programming of adult diseases. Our earlier studies in animals have established that micronutrients (folic acid, vitamin B12) and LCPUFA are interlinked in the one carbon cycle influencing methylation reactions. Our studies in women delivering preterm show reduced levels of LCPUFA, altered levels of micronutrients and lowered placental global DNA methylation levels at delivery. We therefore postulate that alterations in the micronutrient metabolism may affect the regulation of the enzymes [methionine adenosyltransferase (MAT2a) and S-adenosyl homocysteine hydrolase (AHCY) in the placenta thereby affecting SAM synthesis and methylation potential in women delivering preterm. The present study examines the mRNA and protein levels of the enzymes [MAT2A and AHCY] along with SAM and SAH levels from preterm (n=73) and term (n=73) placenta. The mRNA levels of enzymes were analyzed by qRT-PCR, protein levels by ELISA and SAM-SAH levels by HPLC. The mRNA levels for MAT2a and AHCY are higher (p<0.05 for both) in the preterm group as compared to term group. SAM and SAH levels were similar in both groups, although SAM: SAH ratio was lower (p<0.05) in the preterm group as compared to term. This data indicates a lower methylation potential in the preterm placenta which may have implications for the epigenetic programming of the developing fetus.

Snehlata Garg

Pandit Bhagwat Dayal Sharma Post Graduate Institute of Medical Sciences, India

Title: Effect of different phases of menstrual cycle on peak expiratory flow rate

Time : 18:05-18:20

Speaker
Biography:

Sneh lata Garg has done her graduation (MBBS) from Medical College, Patiala in 1998.Then she joined the Haryana civil medical services( HCMS) in 2000 as medical officer. From last two years she is doing her post-graduation in MD physiology at PGIMS, Rohtak through Haryana government.

Abstract:

Introduction: Changes in the levels of various hormones during different phases of menstrual cycle are known to affect various functions of body apart from reproductive system. This study was planned to see effect of different phases of menstrual cycle on peak expiratory flow rate in normal healthy young females of age group between 18-24 years. Material & Method: Study was performed on 30 healthy normal regularly menstrual medical students of age group 18-24 years in different phases of menstrual cycle for single cycle. PEFR is recorded in different phases of menstrual cycle .menstrual phase(2nd to 4th day),proliferative phase(9th to 12th day)and luteal (19th to 21st day).Instrument used was WRIGHT’s peak expiratory flow meter. Three readings were taken in standing condition and maximum of three readings were considered in each phase. Results: Peak expiratory flow rate was significantly higher (p<0.05)during the luteal phase of menstrual cycle as compared to menstrual and proliferative phases. Conclusion: As PEFR was better during luteal phase so this suggests a possible role of increased levels of progesterone during the luteal phase on respiratory system.

  • Track 10: Environmental Biotechnology and sustainable development
Location: Hall-3
Speaker

Chair

Ram Lakhan Singh

Dr. RML Avadh University, India

Speaker

Co-Chair

Nidhee Chaudhary

Amity Institute of Biotechnology, India

Session Introduction

Ram Lakhan Singh

Dr. Ram Manohar Lohia Avadh University, India

Title: Microbial decolourization of textile dye orange II by Sphingomonas sp. RMLRK04

Time : 11:00-11:20

Speaker
Biography:

Ram Lakhan Singh is presently holding the positions of Dean, Faculty of Science; Head, Department of Biochemistry; Coordinator, Biotechnology Programme and Head, Department of Environmental Science at Dr. RML Avadh University. He has completed his PhD in the year 1987 from Indian Institute of Toxicology Research and Kanpur University. His present area of work is Environmental Biochemistry and Biotechnology. He has published more than 78 research papers in the journals of international repute. He has been awarded with ‘Shikshak Shri Samman’ by Government of Uttar Pradesh in 2012 and elected Fellow of Society of Toxicology, India in 2011.

Abstract:

Synthetic dyes are widely used in textile, food, leather, cosmetics and pharmaceutical industries with the textile industry as the largest consumer. The textile finishing generates a large amount of dye containing wastewater that forms one of the largest contributions to water pollution. The removal of the polluting dyes is an important problem particularly for small scale textile industries where working conditions and economic status do not allow them to treat their wastewater before disposal. Biological treatment processes provide an alternative to existing technologies for the decolorization of dyes due to their cost effective and environment-friendly nature. In this study, a bacterial strain Sphingomonas sp. RMLRK04 having capability to decolorize orange II dye was isolated from soil samples collected from the vicinity of textile dyeing units located in Kanpur (India). Studies were conducted to see the effect of various culture and nutritional conditions on decolourization ability of the bacterial strain for orange II dye in minimal salt medium. The optimum pH and temperature for the decolourization of orange II was observed at 7.0 and 30o C respectively during 24 hours of incubation under shaking condition. The decolourization efficiency of this strain using glucose and yeast extract showed increase in rate of decolourization among different carbon and nitrogen source. The bacterial strain showed maximum decolourization at 100 mg l-1 dye concentration and could tolerate up to 100 mg l-1 of dye. The bacterial strain RMLRK04 showed good potential for decolourization of orange II dye.

Speaker
Biography:

Smriti Shrivastava is working as Science and Engineering Board Fast Track Young Scientists. Her core research area is Applied and Industrial Microbiology, Bio-fuels production and enzyme engineering. She is having about 20 research publications. She is a M.Sc and Ph.D. in Applied Microbiology from University of Madras and Birla Institute of Technology respectively. She is a life member of Indian Science Congress and Association of Microbiologists of India. To persue her degree she has been recipient of TATA Millenium fellowship, GATE and Council of Scientific and Industrial Research fellowship. Before joining SERB project, she worked with PDDYP University, Mumbai and Gautam Buddha University, Greater NOIDA.

Abstract:

Development of sustainable and renewable energy resource is one of the most promising requirements of current world. Thermomyces lanuginosus DSM 28966/NCIM 1374 have been extensively studied in our laboratory and at Birla Institute of Technology, Mesra and shown very unique property of degrading complex plant polysaccharide xylan to monosaccharide unit xylose in just 15 minutes of reaction. The uniqueness was in liberating sole monosaccharide unit as byproduct. This property was effectively clubbed with a fermentation process ahead and we were successful in production of 40% ethanol, by the process of simultaneous saccharification and fermentation. In order to increase ethanol production, Xylanase gen xyn SS8 was heterogously expressed in Pichia stipitis and the entire control of saccharification and fermentation process was brought under one living system. Optimization of process for enhanced ethanol production is in progress.

Speaker
Biography:

Nidhee Chaudhary is working as a Professor at Amity Institute of Biotechnology, Amity University Uttar Pradesh, Noida, India. She has completed her PhD from CCS University, Meerut and MPhil from IIT Roorkee, India. She has been in academia for over 17 years in various positions. She has supervised several PhD (theses), MPhil, MSc, MTech and BTech dissertations. She has many international and national publications in journals and books of repute. Her main research interest is in industrially and therapeutically important enzymes along with bioprocessing. Recently, she has been granted to Finn Wold Travel Award by The Protein Society, USA. She has been Member of various scientific groups like: The Protein Society, USA, American Society of Microbiology, USA, OMICS Group, USA, Biotech Research Society (BRSI), India, Global Science and Technology Forum (GSTF), Singapore, Biotech Society of India (BSI), World Academy of Science, Engineering and Technology (WASET), USA, Asian Federation of Biotechnology (AFOB). She has served as reviewer for several reputed Journals like; Journal of Biotechnology and Applied Biochemistry, Journal of Preparative Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Advances in Bioscience and Biotechnology, Journal of Biotechnology, published by Elsevier, Taylor & Francis, Wiley-Blackwell and other established groups.

Abstract:

There is an increasing interest in alternative source of energy due to fast depletion of the world’s energy supply. Bioethanol production through fermentation provides an economical competitive source of energy. Agrowastes like wheat straw and corn stover leave a large amount of residues rich in carbohydrates and sugar. The present investigation deals with the production and optimization of bioethanol from two agrowastes; wheat straw and corn stover using cellulase enzyme and co-cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Aspergillus niger through simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) process. Pulverized wheat straw and corn stover (ratio 4:6) after steam treatment were used as substrate for bioethanol production. Temperature of 300C, inoculum size of S. cerevisiae and A. niger 6% (v/v), 4% (v/v), agitation for the first 24 h with incubation period of 48 h were found to be the best conditions for bioethanol production. The pretreated biomass after enzymatic saccharification containing reducing sugars (60 gL–1) was fermented under optimized conditions resulting in bioethanol production, yield and fermentation efficiency of 23.64 gL–1, 0.394 gg-1 and 77.25%, respectively. This research work may establish that both wheat straw and corn stover, which have been very little exploited commercially for industrial applications and are poorly disposed off, can be effectively used for bioethanol production. Moreover, due to minimal usage of resources/energy for pretreatment gives an edge to it. The results in this paper are very encouraging and can be utilized for scaling up of the process to a pilot scale or commercial fermenter level, thereby, making the process more cost effective along with contribution in solid waste management, henceforth, in green technology.

Speaker
Biography:

Santosh Kumar Tiwari has completed his PhD from University of Delhi South Campus, New Delhi. He was Visiting Scientist in School of Biological Sciences, Rutgers State University, New Jersey, USA. Currently, he is Assistant Professor in Department of Genetics, Maharshi Dayanand University, Rohtak, Haryana. He has published more than 15 papers in reputed journals and edited a book entitled “Current Trends in Biotechnology”. He has 7 years of teaching and research experience. He was awarded Indo-US Research Fellow, DST Young Scientist and several research projects from UGC, CSIR and DBT, New Delhi.

Abstract:

Two hybrid bacteriocins EP and PE were designed by combining the N-terminal of enterocin E50-52 and the C-terminal of pediocin PA-1 and vice-versa, respectively. Both hybrid bacteriocins showed reduced Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) which were 64- and 32-folds lower than pediocin PA-1 and 8- and 4-folds lower than enterocin E50-52, respectively. Effect of these bacteriocins on transmembrane electrical potential (ΔѰ) and their ability to induce efflux of intracellular ATP was investigated. Enterocin E50-52, pediocin PA-1 and hybrid bacteriocin PE were able to dissipate ΔѰ but EP was unable to deplete this component. Both hybrid bacteriocins showed loss of intracellular concentration of ATP. EP, however, showed faster efflux as compared to PE and enterocin E50-52. Enterocin E50-52 and hybrids PE, and EP were active against tested Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria such as Micrococcus luteus, Salmonella enteritidis 20E1090, and E. coli O157:H7. The hybrid bacteriocins designed and described herein are antimicrobial peptides with lower MIC, which induce loss of intracellular ATP, capable of inhibiting Gram-negative bacteria and PE which dissipates electrical potential. In this study, a hybrid bacteriocin (PE) of pediocin PA-1 and enterocin E50-52 indicated a 64-fold drop in MIC as compared to its natural peptide counterpart. Inhibition of Gram-negative pathogens confers an additional advantage for the application of these peptides in therapeutics.

Speaker
Biography:

Meeta Lavania has completed her PhD in the year 2005 from National Botanical Research Institute CSIR in Microbiology. She is the Fellow of The Energy and Resources Institute, a premier leading biotechnology organization. She is in research since the year 2000 and published more than 35 papers in peer reviewed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute.

Abstract:

Microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR) is potentially useful to incremental oil recovery from a reservoir beyond primary and secondary recovery operation using microorganisms and their metabolites. In accordance to the source of MEOR, microorganisms used can be of two types exogenous or indigenous. Indigenous microorganisms have greater advantages compared to injected microorganisms as they are well adapted to reservoir conditions. In present study, fifteen oil/water samples were collected from a carbonate oil reservoir of heavy oil belt of North Gujarat, India. It has around 108 MMt of oil in place reserve of 12-17 API oil with viscosity ranging between 60 to 559 cp. Geochemical characterization demonstrated oils contains, 330-1050 ppm carbon, 25-78 ppm hydrogen, 24-80 ppm nitrogen, 7.5-35 ppm sulfur, 8 to 50.06% aromatic hydrocarbons. Anaerobic, thermophilic and fermentative enrichment cultures were obtained from the fifteen oil/water samples (TERIL150-TERIL162). Metabolites such as CO2, CH4, H2, ethanol, butanol, acetone and acetate and bio-surfactants were detected. Mixed culture of TERIL146 showed the highest activity among all the mixed cultures screened, growing under 60 to 100°C, 0 to 5% NaCl and 5 to 9 pH. Analysis of the 16S rRNA gene of the TERIL143 consortium showed that the predominant taxon was Methanothermobacter sp., Thermoanaerobacter sp., Gelria sp. and Thermotoga sp. using universal 16S and archaeal primers. Consortium TERIL143 showed production of metabolites methane (12 mM), carbon dioxide (4 mM), hydrogen (10 mM) and volatile fatty acids (2050.83 mg/L). It also produces extracellular bio-surfactant at 70C under anaerobic conditions in mineral medium supplemented with 1% crude oil. Degradation of large alkyl chain was seen with TERIL143 for viscosity reduction of the crude oil under anoxic condition. Produced organic acids and gases could help in dissolution of carbonates, repressurization of wells and changes the surface properties of rocks as well as physical properties of crude oil which may improve the fluid rheology and permeability. Therefore, consortium TERIL143 would be a promising candidate for the enhanced oil recovery.

Speaker
Biography:

Sharad Ratan Khandelwal has completed his BSc, MSc and PhD degrees with merit at the Marathwada University, Aurangabad. He has 21 publications to his credit. He was nominated as a Member of Carrier Advancement Scheme (CAS) by Government of Maharashtra, Director, Higher and Technical Education Pune. He is a certified Auditor for ISO, Switzerland. He is working as a Chairman of MSc Microbiology Examination, University of Pune, Pune. He is honored to be a Member of Editorial Board for the International quarterly journal entitled Journal of Cancer and Therapy. He is also a recognized Guide for PhD/MPhil, University of Pune and YCMOU Nasik. Seven students have been awarded MPhil under his guidance and 6 PhD students are likely to register their names under University of Pune. He is also invited as Referee for PhD thesis evaluation from University of Mumbai and other universities. He has completed 5 minor, 1 major research projects from UGC New Delhi, 1 major project is underway and 1 project from BCUD University of Pune is also underway. He has so far guided 20 MSc dissertations successfully.

Abstract:

Arsenic (As) is highly toxic, heavy metal present in environment due to natural and anthropogenic sources. Arsenic III is more toxic than Arsenic V. Ingestion of Arsenic III leads to increased risks of cancer, gastrointestinal symptoms and disturbances of cardiovascular, lungs, bladder and kidney and environmental pollution. Arsenic removal by biological means is an upcoming and eco-friendly technique where microorganisms have the ability to detoxify heavy metals from the environment. In this work, arsenic was detected from industrial effluents and was found to be significantly higher than WHO limits. Textile dye effluent showed highest arsenic concentration of 249 ppm. From these effluents, arsenic degrading bacteria were isolated and identified as Klebsiella pneumonae, Lysinibacillus fusiformis and Bacillus subtilis. The respective cultures were subjected to bioremediation and highest oxidation was found to be 80%. The effluents were also subjected to biosorption and phytoremediation. Highest biosorption rate was found to be 47.2% by chrome plating effluent isolate within 48 hours of incubation. Consortium of Klebsiella pneumoniae: Pseudomana putida showed 92.8% and Lysinibacillus fusiformis: Bacillus subtilis showed 94% degradation within 4 days. The dye isolate was subjected to synthesis of arsenic nanoparticle which could be exploited for drug delivery. All isolates showed the ability to produce siderophres. This work will help us in careful handling of issues like pollution, over exploitation of natural resources and sustainable development.

Speaker
Biography:

Vinay M Bhandari has completed his PhD in Chemical Engineering in 1993 and has more than 25 years of experience. He is currently working as a Senior Principal Scientist at CSIR-National Chemical laboratory, Pune. His research interests include chemical engineering, separation technology and environmental pollution control. He was invited as a Visiting Faculty at Tohoku University, Japan (1998-99) and as a Visiting Scientist at Korea Institute of Energy Research, South Korea (2004-2005). He has more than 130 publications/presentations, filed 4 patents and has recently authored a book “Industrial Wastewater Treatment, Recycling & Reuse” (Elsevier, 2014).

Abstract:

CaviGulation, a hybrid process by appropriately integrating cavitation and coagulation as a newer technology has been successfully explored for dye wastewater treatment. An eco-friendly approach has been developed by using biocoagulants such as Moringa oleifera, Cicer arietinum and Acanthocereus tetragonus (triangle cactus) and also using commercial inorganic coagulants e.g., PAC SAB 18 and Iron (III) chloride. Removal of Congo red dye was studied and effect of various parameters such as initial dye concentration (50 and 100 ppm), pH (3-7), coagulant dose etc., has been investigated in detail. CaviGulation (Acoustic cavitation/Sonication+Coagulation) shows increased reduction of 48%, 27%, 33%, 24% and 29% over individual coagulation using PAC SAB 18, Moringa oleifera, Acanthocereus tetragonus, Iron (III) chloride and Cicer arietinum respectively, while no reduction was observed with acoustic cavitation alone. The results also indicate that coagulant dose can be reduced by more than half by adjusting pH to 3. The results of this work conclusively indicate cavitation based technique using coagulants as a promising alternative for effective dye wastewater treatment. The use of bio-coagulant and the developed hybrid process can also find applications in industrial wastewater treatment, in general and can provide techno-economically feasible process for environmental pollution control.

Suresh Deka

Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology, India

Title: Degradation of poly aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) by biosurfactant producing bacterial strains

Time : 14:10-14:30

Speaker
Biography:

Suresh Deka is currently working as a Professor in the Environmental Biotechnology Laboratory, Resource Management and Environment Section, Life Sciences Division, Institute of Advanced Study in Science and Technology (IASST), India. He has published more than 40 research papers in reputed journals, 6 chapters of books and 7 proceeding of seminars. He has completed his Postdoctorate Research on Biosurfactant in University of Ulster, UK under the supervision of Professor I M Banat. He has completed several research projects funded by different central governmental agencies as Principal Investigator and Co-Principal Investigator.

Abstract:

Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are toxic compounds. Due to leakage or spillage of crude oil, these toxic hydrocarbons may contaminate the sites. These compounds are low water soluble; as a result, they are not easily degraded by microorganisms. So, remediation of PAH’s through seeding only hydrocarbon degrading microorganisms take more time. Microbial produced surfactant can enhance the bioavailability of these hydrophobic compounds for bioremediation. Keeping this in mind, an investigation was carried out to develop an efficient consortium of biosurfactant producing bacterial strains that could be used for remediation of PAH from contaminated sites. For that, a total of twenty three bacterial strains were isolated from hydrocarbon contaminated soil. The ability of degradation of hydrocarbon of the isolates was tested individually and five of them were selected for further study on the basis of utilization of hydrocarbon. Among these five isolates, three were found biosurfactant producer and two non-producers. Ten different consortia were designed involving best hydrocarbon utilizing strains taking both biosurfactant producers and non-producers. The consortium consisting bacterial strain Bacillus pumilus KS2 and Bacillus cereus R2 (identified by 16s rDNA sequencing) had shown best results in degradation of crude oil. The consortium could degrade 82.15% of total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) from the crude oil in five weeks of incubation time. The consortium could degrade different PAH’s like naphthalene, fluorene, phenanthrene, anthracene, 3.beta.-Myristoyl Olean-12-en-1, 1H-indene, 2,3-dihydro-1,1,5,6 and their derivatives which indicates the prospective of the consortium to be used for remediation of petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated sites.

Speaker
Biography:

Rajesh Kumar has joined Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India after obtaining his Post-graduation in Biotechnology from Banaras Hindu University and later obtained his PhD from University of Madras. He is currently working as a Scientific Officer E and his main research interests include assessment of environmental impact of power plant discharge and wastewater treatment.

Abstract:

After one century of dependence on activated sludge process for treatment of wastewater, aerobic granulation has emerged as new technology being implemented for both domestic and industrial wastewater. It is a superior activated sludge process as it exhibits higher biomass density, very high biomass retention, treatment and settling in single tank, fast bioremediation kinetics and resistance to loading fluctuations. The biomass is primarily constituted by Eubacteria, thereby possessing a limited metabolic diversity like conventional activated sludge. We have taken the technology to higher step by reconstituting natural aquatic biofilms in laboratory in the form of phototrophic granules. Phototrophic aquatic biofilms are the major contributors in restoration of water bodies by treating discarded wastewater. But they need extensive area for exposure to sunlight. By developing phototrophic granules consisting of bacteria, cyanobacteria and microalgae, we have overcome both the problems of limited metabolic diversity of aerobic granules as well as large foot print of phototrophic biofilms. Furthermore, by virtue of being phototrophic, they sequester carbon dioxide as well while carrying out bioremediation of wastewater. The biomass generated in the process can be used for biofuel (methane) generation in anaerobic digester or hybrid processes like Nisargruna (a BARC technology). The phototrophic granular sludge sequencing batch reactors thus can be used simultaneously for wastewater treatment, carbon dioxide sequestration and biomass generation for biofuel production. Laboratory scale five liter photo-bioreactors removed more than 90% total organic carbon (TOC) from wastewater containing 900 ppm to 1500 ppm TOC and removed nutrients like ammonium to below permitted limits. The work for pilot scale testing is in progress.

Speaker
Biography:

Dalia Dasgupta Mandal is an Associate Professor in Department of Biotechnology, National Institute of Technology, Durgapur, India. She did her MSc in Biochemistry from BHU, Varanasi, MTech in Biotechnology from Jadavpur University, Kolkata and PhD in 2001 from Indian Institute of Chemical Biology, Jadavpur University, Kolkata. Her PhD thesis was entitled, “Host-parasite interaction studies specifically on signal transduction mediated alternative pathway to combat Leishmaniasis”. She is presently working on “Host-pollutant interaction with respect to cytotoxicity and DNA damaging effects of pollutants on plant, animal and bacterial system and to find out bioremediation strategies to combat these deadly pollutants hazardous effect on ecosystem”.

Abstract:

In the present study, the genotoxicity and probable risk associated with the three most important, priority pollutants o-cresol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and chromium VI have been studied in Allium test focusing on their DNA damaging effect using comet assay. It was observed that there is a gradual decrease in root length with increased concentration of all the three pollutants tested. The EC50 value obtained are 8 ppm, 2.5 ppm, 14 ppm for o-cresol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and chromium (VI) respectively. The genotoxicity test performed at concentration of EC50 as well as below and above EC50 values in Allium cepa revealed that there is gradual enhancement in % chromosomal aberration with concentrations. At concentration of 10 ppm of each o-cresol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and chromium (VI) % chromosomal aberration are 51±05, 72±05, 59±04 respectively. The sensitivity, specificity and relevance of the comet assay as a method for determination of DNA damage has been successfully established from the increased tail length movement observed with increasing concentration of o-cresol, 2,4,6-trichlorophenol and chromium (VI) compared to tap water as control. Among these three priority pollutant mediated DNA damage, TCP showed maximum damage at fixed concentration of 5 ppm. The present investigation revealed that biomonitoring of flora or fauna of ecosystem exposed to potential mutagens or carcinogens can provide an early detection system for the potential of pollutant which is responsible for initiation of DNA damage, leading to growth inhibition in Allium cepa indicating the need of proper effluent treatment process.

Speaker
Biography:

Sangeetha Vijayan P has completed her MSc in Biotechnology in 2007 and has research experience of about 5 years. She has worked as Project Fellow in Central Plantation Crop Research Institute (CPCRI), India from 2007-2009. She has also worked as Research Associate in a DBT project “Identification of genes for high productivity in low-light using activation tagging” at Agricultural College Nileshwar, Kasargod (2010). She is currently working as Junior Research Fellow at Yenepoya Medical College, Mangalore from 2012. Her area of interest includes toxicity studies in animal models, genetic diversity studies in plants and molecular biology.

Abstract:

Uranium is a heavy metal, well known nephrotoxicant and its toxicity varies with dose, time of exposure and form of uranium. The present study shows the kidney damage induced by a single dose of uranyl nitrate at different time intervals; the study also shows recovery of mice after the uranyl nitrate insult. Animals were dosed and sacrificed after 1, 3, 5, 14, 28 days of administration. Maximum tubular damage was showed after 3 days of treatment with uranyl nitrate, it is considered as peak and the biochemical parameters such as BUN and creatinine values were also significantly increased in time and dose dependant manner. Both histopathological and biochemical alterations with respect to control, 1, 3, 5, 14, 28 days of post dosing with uranyl nitrate were evaluated.

Speaker
Biography:

Ogbulie Toochukwu Ekwutosi has completed her PhD from Federal University of Technology Owerri, Nigeria. She has also obtained additional qualification as Registered Environmental Scientist by NREP, USA in 2008. She is a Senior Lecturer in the Department of Biotechnology, FUTO, Nigeria. She has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of Analele Universitatii din Oradea-Fascicula Biologie, Romania and Romanian Biotechnology Letters. She is a Member of societal bodies such as Society for Applied Microbiology UK (SFAM), Graduate Women in Science GWIS USA, Organization for Women in Science for the Developing World (OWSD), Biotechnology Society of Nigeria & Nigerian Society for Microbiology, Nigerian Environmental Society and National Registry of Environmental Professionals, USA.

Abstract:

Population dynamics of biodegradable consortia in crude oil polluted soil was undertaken. Culture-based and molecular biology technique was employed. The result of the total heterotrophic bacteria count (THC) in cfu/ml showed higher increase in polluted soil on comparison to control sample irrespective of the medium used. Diverse microorganisms were isolated and identified using culture based approach. Bacterial isolates obtained include Acinetobacter, Pseudomonas, Mycobacterium, Proteus mirabilis, Streptococcus, Actinomyces sp, Micrococcus luteus, Bacillus sp, Corynebacterium sp, Lactobacillus sp, E. coli, Providencia, Citrobacter freundii, Enterobacter, Staphylococcus and Alcaligens. Fungal isolates obtained also include Rhizopus, Penicillium, Fusarium, Aspergillus niger, Aspergillus flavus, Aspergillus nidulans, Aspergillus fumigatus, Eurothium, Cladosporium, Brettanomyces, Candida albican and Murtierella. Scoring on the persistence of isolates in polluted soil showed that Micrococcus, Bacillus sp, E. coli and Staphylococcus sp had 33.3% persistence followed by Lactobacillus sp, Providencia sp, Citrobacter and Bacillus sp (subspecies) which recorded 66.6% persistence whereas others persisted throughout the study. Molecular identification of organisms using specific primers as C230 had bands depicting similarity of about 90% to catechol 2, 3-dioxygenase gene with significant alignment for Bacillus megaterium, Bacillus cereus, Micrococcus luteus and Lactobacillus acidophilus. ACT and OM primer produced 100% significant alignment for Corynebacterium, Actinomyces, Candidatus, Streptococcus, Streptomyces and Enterobacter cloacca, Streptococcus salivarius, Yerisinia sp respectively. Random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay using specific oligonucleotide primer OP sequence of 5’ GTGACGTAGG 3’ was employed to generate several distinct DNA product which primed at multiple locations throughout the genome of test isolates. Spectrum of amplified product was evident with B2, B16, B17 and B30 isolates. Although distinct tree obtained using PyELph 1.4 software elucidated that B16 and B17 which are gram positive rods are not closely related but the position of band 3 and 4 of both isolate indicates that they may have similar traits of negligible identity. Statistical analysis however showed that the volume of crude oil in relation to weeks of treatment have significant interaction effects on the total heterotrophic count.

Rekha Kathal

University of Delhi, India

Title: Phytoremediation of heavy metals from the polluted soils

Time : 16:30-16:50

Speaker
Biography:

Rekha Kathal has completed her PhD from Delhi University in 1990. She is currently working as Associate Professor in Department of Botany, Daulat Ram College, University of Delhi, India. She has organized various workshops in the College under Star College Project sponsored by Department of Biotechnology, Government of India.

Abstract:

Phytoremediation is considered to be a “Green Revolution” in the field of innovative clean up technologies. It describes the treatment of environmental problems through the use of plants that mitigate the same without the need to excavate the contaminated material and dispose it elsewhere. Some plants proved to be popular organism for bio-monitoring to determine and identify the sources of heavy metal soil pollution and their detoxification by phytoextraction techniques. In the present work, soil and plant (luxuriously growing as hyper accumulator) samples were collected from the polluted sites to find out the extent of heavy metal accumulation in them. Soil and plant samples were digested using green analytical technique for metal analysis and analyzed for the heavy metal content using Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometry (AAS). We found Saccharum, Brassica juncea, Tamarix and Ricinus as efficient accumulators of heavy metals from the soil. The general trend of heavy metal accumulation pattern in soil samples from all the sites was found out to be in order of: Pb>Cu>Ni>Cr>Cd. For greenhouse experiment Brassica juncea and DU nursery soil was selected. Results of AAS of digested samples of both plants and soils of greenhouse experiments showed that heavy metal content declined in pot soil after plants have been grown and harvested. Therefore, it was concluded that Brassica is a good accumulator and proved to be a remedy for controlling heavy metal soil pollution. Most important in phytoremediation is to use wild plants as accumulators in the greenhouse experiment as it minimizes the chances of bio-magnification of heavy metals in food chain. Further, its use in mixed cropping in the field of food crops reduces the risk of health hazards due to heavy metal toxicity.

Poulomi Mukherjee

Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, India

Title: Studies on feasibility of processing dry leaves by Nisargruna biogas technology

Time : 16:50-17:10

Speaker
Biography:

Poulomi Mukherjee has joined Bhabha Atomic Research Centre as a Scientific Officer through the 47th batch of training school. She has been working on the green synthesis of nanoparticles and also on extending Nisargruna Biogas Technology as a sustainable solution for solid waste management. She has 9 international publications to her credit.

Abstract:

Nisargruna Biogas Technology (NBT) is being popularized as a decentralized solution for municipal solid waste management. The processing of biodegradable waste through this bi-phasic process generates methane and organic manure as by products. It also saves cost of transportation of refuse to landfills and the long term ecological hazards of dumping. In order to make the NBT amenable to garden waste and other cellulose rich biomass agriculturally important fungal cultures like Aspergillus and Trichoderma were applied to garden waste in aqueous medium and incubated for 4 days. This was followed by addition of pre-digester slurry (where the predominant bacteria are of Bacillus species) of Nisargruna biogas plant. Formation of organic acids during this incubation period was assayed by HPLC. Presence of two organic acids namely acetic and butyric acids were detected in the fungus treated biomass. Acetic acid production in all the fungal treatments was higher than the control where no fungal treatment was given. Butyric acid production in Aspergillus treated biomass was consistently higher as compared to control and other treatments at all the time points under investigation. Methane generation was studied after treating the partially degraded cellulosic biomass with anaerobic slurry from the main digester (source of Methanogenic bacteria). Methane generation increased consistently with the time of incubation in both controls and experimental samples. Methane generated in fungus treated biomass was higher as compared to control, throughout the two week period of methane measurement. It was demonstrated that garden waste could be used as a substrate for methane production.

Speaker
Biography:

Sudipta Dey is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Biotechnology, Heritage Institute of Technology, India. She has completed PhD in Engineering and MTech in Biotechnology from Jadavpur University, Kolkata. She has completed her BTech in Chemical Engineering. Her research interest is environmental biotechnology, especially biological wastewater treatment and bioprocess engineering. She has published several international publications in reputed journals and serving as Reviewer of several journals of repute.

Abstract:

Phenolic compounds including cresols and resorcinol are found to co-exist in industrial effluents, especially in petrochemical, steel-plant, coke-oven wastewater. An indigenous mixed microbial culture collected from effluent treatment plant of a coke oven industry was used to biodegrade synthetic wastewater containing bi-substrate mixture of resorcinol and m-cresol, under aerobic condition in batch reactor system. The effect of individual substrate concentrations and their interaction on the rate of phenolics biodegradation were also determined. The resorcinol and m-cresol as bi-substrates were completely utilized after 18 hours when the solutes were present at low concentrations of 50 mg/L each. But the culture took total 74 hours to completely biodegrade higher concentrations i.e., 400 mg/L of each substrate. Both substrates were degraded simultaneously but preferential uptake of resorcinol over m-cresol was observed. Both specific growth rate of the culture and the specific substrate degradation rate descended to lower value in presence of dual phenolic substrates compared to their presence as single substrate, showing inhibition and interaction between the substrates. A 22 full factorial design with the two substrates at two different levels of initial concentration (high and low as 50 mg/L and 400 mg/L, respectively) was explored to design the biodegradation experiments and interactions. SUM kinetic model was fitted to experimental data by MATLAB 7.1© and used to evaluate kinetic parameters including interaction coefficients like qmax1, qmax2, Ks1, Ks2, I21, I12, Ki1, Ki2. From the interaction parameters obtained from this model, it was found that resorcinol inhibited the specific m-cresol degradation rate to a higher extent than inhibition caused by m-cresolon resorcinol degradation (I21=0.112, I12=0.216, RMSE=0.0111).

Uma Aulwar

Sir Parshurambhau College, India

Title: Production of biosurfactant and their role in bioremediation

Time : 17:30-17:50

Speaker
Biography:

Uma Aulwar has completed her PhD from Aurangabad University. She has published more than 8 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial Board Member of repute. She is currently working as an Assistant Professor in Sir Parshurambhau College, India.

Abstract:

Oil pollution is an environmental problem of increasing importance. Hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms, adapted to grow and thrive in oil-containing environments have an important role in the biological treatment of this pollution. One of the limiting factors in this process is the bioavailability of many fractions of the oil. The hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms produce biosurfactants of diverse chemical nature and molecular size. These surface-active materials increase the surface area of hydrophobic water-insoluble substrates and increase their bioavailability, thereby enhancing the growth of micro organisms and the rate of bioremediation. Biosurfactant producing fungi was identified on the basis of their morphological, physiological, biochemical tests and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. These fungi were screened for biosurfactant production using different carbon sources by measuring the surface tension of the medium at different time intervals. This biosurfactant has high emulsifying activity when compared to chemical surfactants such as Tween-80 and Triton X-100 with respect to aliphatic and aromatic hydrocarbons. However, present and future studies involve new biosurfactants and new applications as sustainable, renewable additives for nanoparticle production and use.

Speaker
Biography:

Archana Tiwari is presently working as Head of the Department, School of Biotechnology (An Autonomous University Teaching Department) Rajiv Gandhi Proudyogiki Vishwavidyalaya (State Technological University of Madhya Pradesh), India. She was the recipient of various prestigious research awards, some representative ones are UGC Post Doc Research Award, Bharat Shishksha Ratan Award, Glory of India Award, etc. She has eight patents on recombinant subunit vaccine to her credit. She has completed national & international research projects funded by reputed global funding agencies and published more than 100 research papers in refereed journals.

Abstract:

The weighty accumulation of plastic waste and less effective measures for its management; LDPE degradation has become a serious ecological issue to be dealt with. Tremendous increases in the manufacture and consumption of plastics over recent decades have persistently arisen numerous ecological and economic concerns. Microorganisms are a part of biological process and are thus being implemented. Biodegradation takes place through the action of microbial enzymes and or chemical deterioration associated with living organisms. This event occurs in two steps: The fragmentation of the polymers into lower molecular mass species by means of either abiotic reaction i.e., oxidation, photo-degradation or hydrolysis or biotic reactions i.e., degradations by microorganisms. Step two is followed by bio-assimilation of the polymer fragments by microorganisms and their mineralization. The new strain Pseudomonas citronellolis EMBS027 is addition to the list of LDPE degrading bacterial strains. A good degradation rate of 17.8% has been observed within 4 days of in vitro analysis. The present study thus explores the indigenously surviving individual strains and bacterial consortium for better polyethylene waste management. Hence, the investigation has been designed to make a small contribution to surmount the challenges faced by LDPE non-degradability and to prove the microbial process as a better existing alternative over the recently used processes like recycling, land filling and incineration. Thus, the investigation focused to discover a novel strain which can be further implicated for petroleum-plastic biodegradation.

Speaker
Biography:

Anilkumar Gopinathan is a Senior Professor at the School of Biosciences and Technology, VIT University, India. He had his Postdoctoral Training in Invertebrate Molecular Endocrinology from the University of Oklahoma, USA as a DBT Overseas Associate. A two-time Grantee of Research Projects from the International Foundation for Science (IFS, Stockholm, Sweden). He is also currently the Scientific Advisor to the IFS. He had also been Visiting Scientist to the University of Gdansk (Poland), International Sakharov Environmental University (Minsk, Belarus) and the University of Oklahoma (under Indo-US DST-NSF program). He was awarded by St. Berchman’s Best Teacher, a Covetable State-Level Award. He has also chaired scientific sessions in several international conferences.

Abstract:

Non-peptide hormones (like steroids) rely on Nuclear Receptors (NRs) to activate the target gene to effect hormone action. To bind with the hormone (ligand), NR has ligand binding domain (LBD). The other domain which is functionally important is the DNA binding domain (DBD), a highly conserved domain, instrumental in binding with the target gene. Evidently, NRs are ubiquitous among metazoans in both vertebrates and invertebrates. The ecdysteroids act as hormones that promote growth in several invertebrates and are known to act through the NR, theecdysteroid receptor (EcR), encoded by the ecdysteroid receptor gene (EcR). EcR expression is found to fluctuate in a stage-dependant manner related to growth. Insects became the first model organism wherein the EcR was detected and the expression was studied. Subsequently, EcR was detected in other invertebrate groups as well. Crustaceans became the other major group wherein the EcR gene expression was studied. Interestingly, Carney and Bender (2000) have demonstrated that ecdysteroid receptor is a requisite for successful vitellogenesis in Drosophila. Since then, researchers have been trying to unravel the role of EcR in insect reproduction. Investigations have also led to the identification of retinoid receptors that dimerize with the EcR to accomplish the hormone action. These results have encouraged the carcinologists to hypothesize that a comparable situation might exist in crustaceans as well. Of late, the experiments performed on Drosophila and Tribolium have shown a putative receptor (the ‘Met’ receptor) for the terpenoid hormone (JH), analog of MF, the gonadotropic hormone in crustaceans. However, the exact mechanism of the cascade of events, beginning from the ecdysteroids, leading to vitellogenesis is yet to be understood. The present paper would discuss at length, the possibilities of these hormone receptors getting involved in growth and reproduction in invertebrates.

Speaker
Biography:

L.J.S Undugoda from University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka speaker at Biotechnology-2015 she is doing research on characterization and biotechnology prospecting of the phyllosphere microorganism s capable in aromatic hydrocarbon degradation.

Abstract:

The bacterial strains, Alcaligenes feacalis and Alcaligenes sp. DN25 which were isolated from the phyllosphere of four ornamental plant species, Ixora chinensis, Ervatamia divaricata, Hibiscus rosa-sinensis and Amaranthus cruentus in five highly polluted sites in Sri Lanka showed the highest phenanthrene and naphthalene degradation ability. Transformation and plasmid curing results of them were revealed; naphthalene and phenanthrene degradation ability of these bacterial strains were plasmid encoded character. The occurrence of naphthalene specific (nahR and nahU) genes and phenanthrene specific (phnAc and phnG) genes of these catabolic plasmids were analyzed by PCR using degenerate primers. According to the amplification results, plasmids of Alcaligenes faecalis and Alcaligenes sp. DN25 harbor nahR, nahU and phnG genes but lack of phnAc gene. RFLP and sequence data of nahU and nahR amplicons revealed both of these genes were homologous to these two bacterial strains. But, phnG gene of two phenanthrene and naphthalene degrading phyllosphere bacterial strains was coexistence as two distinct copies of alleles.

Speaker
Biography:

Henam Sylvia Devi has completed her MSc from Delhi University and she is currently pursuing PhD from National Institute of Technology, India. She has two and half years of research experience working in the field of green approaches for the synthesis of nanoparticles. She has published a paper and three other papers are communicated with SCI journals.

Abstract:

An aqueous green approach for fabrication of copper nanoparticle using ascorbic acid and starch is reported in this work. Environmental benign solvents reducing agent and capping agent are must at present due to the increase in contamination of environment. Ascorbic acid a well known naturally occurring potent reducing agent is employed in this method of synthesis for reduction of copper salt in matrix of a biopolymer, starch. Starch is a natural polysaccharide which is biodegradable, biocompatible and has bio-adhesion property. In this work ascorbic acid and starch are used because of its easy of availability, low cost, non-toxic and benign product. Throughout the synthesis process only eco-friendly chemicals/reagents are used. Nanoparticle of copper fabricated are characterized using TEM-SAED, SEM-EDAX, UV-Visible spectroscopy and IR-spectroscopy. EDAX confirmed the present of copper in the as such prepared nanomaterials. This nanoparticles show localized surface plasma resonance band at 321 nm. As revealed by TEM images, average size of the particles ranges from 2 nm-3 nm. These copper particles tend to aggregate to give a flower like shape structure it may be due to its small sized which result in high surface energy. Here starch act as stabilizing agent/capping agent by stabilizing the surface of the particles preventing it from aggregation. SAED pattern revealed the crystallinity and diffraction pattern corresponding to the Face Centered Cubic (FCC) planes (111), (200) and (220) of copper nanoparticles. Copper nanoparticles fabricated seem to play very important role in treatment/reduction of organic pollutants to a less toxic/biodegradable product. Kinetic study for the degradation of dye was carried out successfully at different temperatures.

Speaker
Biography:

Sayan Bhattacharya has completed his BSc in Zoology, MSc in Environmental Science and PhD in Environmental Biotechnology from University of Calcutta. He has completed two years of Post doctoral research in Environmental Chemistry from Presidency University. Presently he is working as an Assistant Professor in the Department of Environmental Studies, Rabindra Bharati University, India. He has published more than 100 international journal papers, book chapters, international conference proceedings and science articles. He has received Young Researcher Award from Government of India. He is in the Reviewers’ committees of many international journals and in the Editorial Boards of international journals with high impact factors. He has over 8 years of teaching experiences in 5 colleges and universities of West Bengal.

Abstract:

Forest cover in the hill regions is essential to maintain environmental, economic and ecological balances. North Bengal accounts for 3,086 sq km (26%) of the 11,876 sq km area of classified forests in the state and for nearly 5,000 sq km (40%) of all land under tree cover. Khumani Forest Village is situated (26.84o N, 88.60o E) in Gorubathan Block in Darjeeling District of West Bengal State, India. The survey work was done in December, 2014 by visiting the Khumani Forest Village (established in 1949) of upper Kumai and the primary data were gathered through field survey and direct contact with common people and authorized centers of the region. Surveys on the demography, agriculture, livestock management, water management, education, culture, health, waste management, disaster management, transport, biodiversity, human animal conflict were done in this area. Topographic map of the area was prepared by using the database of National Atlas and Thematic Mapping Organization (NATMO), Kolkata office. Demographic information was collected from the village area and the Panchayat. Census report was collected from the local Panchayat office. There are 115 houses in the village with total population of 724. Religious and social festival information was collected from the local people. Environmental activities of the local NGO (Water and Environment Conservation Committee) were documented. This NGO established in 2011 (with government registration) by the local inhabitants and 15 local villagers are currently operating the NGO. They used to conduct the afforestation programs, mitigate soil erosion in the hills, manage plastic wastes and are also involved in rural developmental activities. Human animal conflicts were studied in the village area, as the area is periodically disturbed by the encroachment of elephant, rhinoceros and leopard. Biodiversity of the region was documented by visiting the adjacent forest areas. In every phase of the survey work, pictorial documentation was done. In spite of being positioned in a diverse and sensitive ecological zone, the village is not adequately managed. There is an urgent need for implementing sustainable management systems in the areas for the betterment of the socio-environmental structures. Some of the possible management strategies have been suggested for maintaining the social, environmental, economic and ecological balance of the region.