Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 21st European Biotechnology Congress Holiday Inn Vinogradovo, Moscow, Russia.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Vladimir P Torchilin

Northeastern University, USA

Keynote: Next Step in drug delivery: Getting Inside cells and to individual organelles

Time : 10:00-10:40

Conference Series Euro Biotechnology 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Vladimir P Torchilin photo
Biography:

Vladimir P Torchilin PhD DSc, is a University Distinguished Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences and Director, Center for Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Nanomedicine, Northeastern University, Boston. His interests include drug delivery and targeting, nanomedicine, multifunctional and stimuli-sensitive pharmaceutical nanocarriers, biomedical polymers, experimental cancer therapy. He has published more than 400 original papers, more than 150 reviews
and book chapters, wrote and edited 12 books, and hold more than 40 patents. Google Scholar shows more than 55,000 citations of his papers with H-index of 105. He is Editor-in-Chief of Current Drug Discovery Technologies, Drug Delivery, and OpenNano, Co-Editor of Current Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and on the Editorial Boards of many other journals. He received more than $30M from the governmental and industrial sources in research funding. He
has multiple honors and awards and in 2011, Times Higher Education ranked him number 2 among top world scientists in pharmacology for the period of 2000-2010.

Abstract:

There are already some means to deliver drugs inside cells bypassing the lysosomal degradation. Thus, coupling of cellpenetrating
peptides (CPP) to various molecules, including peptides and proteins, or even to nanoparticles, such as
liposomes, dramatically facilitates their intracellular delivery. Similar effect could be achieved using phage coat fusion proteins
purified from the phages selected for their specificity towards certain target cells as was shown with liposome-loaded anticancer
drugs. The combination of targeted delivery of drug-loaded nanopreparations to target cells and their subsequent delivery
inside cells might still further improve the efficiency of therapy. Intracellular drug delivery with subsequent organelle targeting
opens new opportunities in overcoming problems associated with multiple pathologies including lysosomal storage diseases
and multidrug resistance (MDR) tumors. Delivery of deficient enzymes for the treatment of lysosomal diseases evidently
requires specific targeting of lysosomes, while facilitating apoptotic cell death in MDR tumor would require targeting of
mitochondria or lysosomes. Thus, next generation drug delivery systems should be able to target individual organelles inside
cells. Clearly, this challenge will require some novel approaches in engineering multifunctional nanomedicines, capable of
accumulating in the target tissue, penetrating inside cells, bypassing lysosomes, and bringing pharmaceuticals to individual
organelles. Examples of specific targeting of pharmaceutical nanocarriers loaded with pharmaceutical agents to lysosomes and
mitochondria in cells illustrate the benefits of this new approach.

Conference Series Euro Biotechnology 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Sergey Suchkov photo
Biography:

Sergey Suchkov graduated from Astrakhan State Medical University and was awarded with MD and maintained his PhD and Doctor’s degree. He was working for Helmholtz Eye Research Institute and Moscow Regional Clinical Research Institute. He was a Secretary-in-Chief of the Editorial Board, Biomedical Science, an international journal published jointly by the USSR Academy of Sciences and the Royal Society of Chemistry, UK. Currently, he is a Director of Center for Personalized Medicine, Sechenov University; Chair of the Department for Translational Medicine, Moscow Engineering
Physics University and Secretary General of United Cultural Convention, Cambridge, UK. He is a Member of the New York Academy of Sciences; American Chemical Society; American Heart Association; AMEE, Dundee, UK; EPMA, Brussels, EU; PMC, Washington, DC, USA and ISPM, Tokyo,
Japan.

Abstract:

A new systems approach to diseased states and wellness result in a new branch in the healthcare services, namely, personalized
medicine (PM). To achieve the implementation of PM concept into the daily practice including clinical cardiology, it is
necessary to create a fundamentally new strategy based upon the subclinical recognition of bioindicators (biopredictors and
biomarkers) of hidden abnormalities long before the disease clinically manifests itself. Each decision-maker values the impact
of their decision to use PM on their own budget and well-being, which may not necessarily be optimal for society as a whole.
It would be extremely useful to integrate data harvesting from different databanks for applications such as prediction and
personalization of further treatment to thus provide more tailored measures for the patients and persons-at-risk resulting
in improved outcomes whilst securing the healthy state and wellness, reduced adverse events, and more cost effective use of
health care resources. One of the most advanced areas in cardiology is atherosclerosis, cardiovascular and coronary disorders
as well as in myocarditis. A lack of medical guidelines has been identified by the majority of responders as the predominant
barrier for adoption, indicating a need for the development of best practices and guidelines to support the implementation of
PM into the daily practice of cardiologists! Implementation of PM requires a lot before the current model “physician-patient”
could be gradually displaced by a new model “medical advisor-healthy person-at-risk”. This is the reason for developing global
sci-entific, clinical, social, and educational projects in the area of PM to elicit the content of the new branch.

Keynote Forum

Igor l Katkov

Belgorod National State Research University, Russian Federation

Keynote: Stopping biological time: Science and art of biostabilization

Time : 11:40-12:20

Conference Series Euro Biotechnology 2018 International Conference Keynote Speaker Igor l Katkov photo
Biography:

Igor L Katkov is a trained biophysicist with 30+ years of experience in cryobiology and cryogenic engineering. His last years of research have been focused on the fundamental aspects of kinetic vitrification (K-VF) as well on designing the practical system for K-VF KrioBlast™ (in cooperation with V F Bolyukh). Currently, the Head of the Laboratory of the Amorphous state at the Belgorod National Research University BelSU, Russia. He has recently accepted a
Professor level position as the Head of the Laboratory of Cryobiology at the V I Kulakov Research Center of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Perinatology (RCGOP), Moscow, Russia and Chief Scientific Officer of Celltronix, San Diego, CA, USA.

Abstract:

Biostabilization (a.k.a. biopreservation) is a process that leads to cessation of the basic chemical and biological reactions
so the biosamples can be pooled and stored (biobanked) for long time. There are 5 basics ways of achieving long-term
storage, which ALL essentially lead to vitrification of cells, namely: slow freezing (SF), equilibrium vitrification (E-VF), kinetic
vitrification (K-VF), freeze-drying (lyophilization) and vacuum/air flow drying at temperatures above 0°C (xeropreservation).
Different combinations of the 5 basic biopreservation technologies such a preliminary drying before cryogenic slow freezing
or vitrification is also possible. Author will discuss a phase diagram that shows all 5 basic ways of biostabilization and will
discuss pros and cons of all approaches. A special emphasis will be put on the kinetic vitrification as it does not require the
high concentrations of (or does not need at all) potentially toxic and osmotically damaging exogenous permeable intracellular
vitrificants (also called cryoprotectants). Author will also present KrioBlast-2, a pilot version of the KrioBlast™ platform for
cryopreservation by K-VF. Preliminary experiments on K-VF of human pluripotent stem cells and spermatozoa, which
showed an equally excellent (80-90% of the untreated control) will be also discussed. A more advanced version KrioBlast-3
will be discussed in the concurrent presentation.

  • Environmental Biotechnology | Bioprocess and Fermentation Technology | Agriculture Biotechnology Molecular Biotechnology and Genetics | Pharmaceutical BioteEnvironmental Biotechnology | Bioprocess and Fermentation Technology | Agriculture Biotechnology Molecular Biotechnology and Genetics | Pharmaceutical Biotechnology and Drug Designchnology and Drug Design
Location: Winter garden
Speaker

Chair

Igor Katkov

Belgorod National State Research University, Russian Federation

Speaker

Co-Chair

Farouk El-Baz

National Research Centre, Egypt

Speaker
Biography:

Farouk K El-Baz has completed his PhD from Cairo University, Cairo. He is a Professor of Biochemistry, the Principal Investigator of biodiesel production from algae as a renewable energy source project which funded by EU. He is also the PI of Industrial Pharmaceutical Alliance (NRC) sponsored by the Academy of Scientific Research and Technology, Egypt. He is the Director of Algal Technology Unit/ NRC, Cairo, Egypt. He has published 152 papers in international journals; He has supervised 18 theses, and serving as the Reviewer of many international journals.

Abstract:

The aim of this study is to investigate the biomass and oil production capacity of S. obliquus grown in outdoor photobioreactors (PBR) under nitrogen repletion and starvation conditions. The volume of PBR was 4000 liters as a demo unit with the facility of computerized controlled system. The results showed that, the maximum biomass achieved with the highest dilution rate (0.25%) was 43.2 gm-2d-1. This was detected when the dry weight was 2.1 g/L. The maximum oil content reached to 26%±0.23 after 29 days under N repletion. However under nitrogen starvation, the oil content was dramatically increased and reached to 41.9%±0.6 after 8 days. Fatty acids profile showed that, both saturated and unsaturated acids were detected. The major saturated fatty acids were palmitic and stearic acids. The unsaturated fractions were detected as palmitoleic, oleic, linoleic and linolenic acids. The fatty acids with four or more double bonds were not detected. Total saturated fatty acids represented 60.47% and 67.43% under nitrogen repletion and nitrogen starvation respectively. The use of photobioreactor for the production of algae is economically feasible, where there is a large amount of sun energy available, which provides a great saving for energy. A high quality of biodiesel could be produced from microalgae S. obliquus and used efficiently and environmentally safe in conventional diesel engine

Monika Cserjan

University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Austria

Title: 12:40-13:00
Speaker
Biography:

Monika Cserjan has completed her PhD at the University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Vienna in 1998. She is Senior Scientist in the Christian Doppler Laboratory for production of next-level biopharmaceuticals in E. coli at the Department of Biotechnology (Fermentation Technology Group), Vienna and Project Leader at the Austrian Centre of Industrial Biotechnology (ACIB).

Abstract:

Although E. coli is the most prominent bacterial production host for recombinant proteins, some proteins with high economic potential can still hardly be produced at remunerative levels. We selected four different Fabs (Fragment, antigen binding) (BIBH1, BIWA4, CIMZIA and FabX) with identical constant domains representing such challenging proteins. Fab yield can be affected by miss-folding, aggregation or unbalanced expression, translation and translocation levels of sub-units, making it still challenging to efficiently design expression systems and production processes. For translocation to the periplasm a post-translational (ompA) and a co-translational (dsbA) leader sequence were used. E. coli BL21(DE3) and E. coli HMS174(DE3) were transformed either via pET vectors or genome integration. The resulting 32 clones, were cultivated under fed-batch like conditions in the BioLector. Cell growth was not affected by leader/Fab combinations but yield of correctly folded Fab ranged from 0 to 12.5 mg/g CDM. Higher expression rates caused higher amounts of free light chain and K12 strain reached higher yields. Except of CIMZIA with the dsbA leader, genome integrated versions showed higher Fab yields, reduced levels of free light chain and basal expression than plasmid-based systems. Independent from used expression system, highest yields were obtained with CIMZIA followed by BIWA4, BIBH1 and FabX. Leader sequence cleavage-efficiency for DsbA was significantly lower than for OmpA, both showed lowest with CIMZIA. Summarizing, we showed that the selected set of host/gene dosage/leader/Fab combinations resulted in a broad range of variation in terms of Fab yields and processing and will be studied detailed in bench-scale fermentations. 

Petrova Natalia Vladimirovna

Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology, Russia

Title: A new direction for viral infections management
Speaker
Biography:

Petrova Natalia Vladimirovna has graduated from Saratov State University named after Chernyshevsky and since that time she launched into the scientific work. She was honoured to take part in international scientific project Marie Curie Actions: International Research Staff Exchange Scheme (Institutte of Transfusion Medicine, Berlin). At the moment, she is involved in her Postdoctoral studies at the Institute of General Pathology and Pathophysiology, where she is currently taking a position of Research Associate. She is a co-author of seven papers in reputed journals.

Abstract:

A New Direction For Viral Infections Management: Viral diseases are still one of the most pressing global problems of society throughout the world. The problem of effectiveness and safety for currently used antiviral therapy is still a major concern; a principally new approaches and the creation on their basis of the original preparations are strongly required. The development of drugs capable of boosting host immune response and affecting target molecules involved in viral pathogenesis seems to be very promising in this respect. Products formulated on the basis of released-active forms of antibodies (RA Abs) meet this needs. The recent years brought persuasive results of RA Abs efficacy obtained in a variety models against a number of viral diseases. For instanse, in a models of influenza, rota–, rhino– and herpes viruses the reduction of pathogen titers, resolution of symptoms along with the higher survival rates were demonstrated. For retroviral infection an inhibition of main viral factors involved in the process of penetration and replication was examined. Apart from that, the drugs demonstrated an excellent safety profile in full-scale toxicity studies.Thus, drugs on the base of RA Abs seems to be a worthy candidates for further development and investigation.
 

Speaker
Biography:

Erdogan Esref Hakki has completed his PhD from Middle East Technical University (Ankara), Department of Biotechnology, in 2000. He is running a Molecular Genetics Laboratory in Konya (TR) within Selcuk University, Faculty of Agriculture. His studies are mainly focussed on abiotic stresses (boron, salinity etc.) of crop plants. 

Abstract:

Worldwide, around 20% of irrigated lands are damaged by salt stress. Hence, either crop production from the non-effected land should be increased or genotypes with stress tolerance should be developed to be grown in stress-affected land. Salt stress largely effects crop yield by making the spikelets sterile, inhibiting the flowering, reducing the grain weight and leading to stunted plant growth. Saline growth environment produces phenotypical symptoms that are linked to physiological and biochemical mechanism of the plant. Wheat, an important cereal crop and chief source of energy is widely consumed in different parts of the world. Apace with the continuously increasing population, it is crucial to enhance its production to meet the current nutritional requirements. However, its production is largely restricted due to salinity stress in arid and semi-arid regions of the world. In such state, developing wheat varieties with greater salt tolerance can be a preferred strategy. Hence, in a combined classical breeding and marker assisted selection program, Triticum monococcum based salt tolerant genes have been transferred in Turkish bread and durum wheat genotypes. In order to identify the other genes involved in the physiological mechanism, Backcross 3 material of the program will be tested for tolerance against high levels of salinity under greenhouse growth conditions. 

Speaker
Biography:

Mehmet Hamurcu has completed his PhD from Selcuk University, Konya, Department of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition in 2007. He is running a Physiology
Laboratory in Konya (TR) within Selcuk University, Faculty of Agriculture. His study focused on abiotic stresses (drought, salinity, boron etc.), antioxidant
activities, and reactive oxygen species of plants.

Abstract:

Being a colorless low molecular weight gas molecule, NO plays an important role as a second messenger in biochemical and physiological processes in plants. Researchers determined that exogenous applications of NO molecules are involved in plant defense mechanism in addition to plant growth and development, germination, de-etiolation, chlorosis, and senescence mechanism. NO plays a crucial role in signal transduction and interacts with active oxygen species to inhibit lipid peroxidation in plants under stress conditions. Induction of oxidative properties by reacting with superoxide radicals, especially under drought stress conditions, indicates the potential antioxidant role of NO in plant metabolism. Therefore, it is important to determine the effect of nitric oxide application under stress conditions. Our research group has examined the physiological and biochemical effects of NO donor SNP on different plant species like wheat, rye, barley, maize, beans, soybean and watermelon under different abiotic stress conditions such as drought and salinity. The results of the study showed that NO applications in abiotic stress conditions were effective in suppressing reactive oxygen species and MDA levels, and also had positive effects on protective antioxidant activities that produced stress responses. These effects were more effective in case of wheat, barley, bean and soybean plants.

Speaker
Biography:

Saroj Mishra completed her PhD from City University of NewYork, USA followed by Post-doctoral research at Institute Pasteur, Paris, France, VTT
Biotechnical Laboratory, Espoo, Finland and University of California, Davis, USA. She has published more than 87 papers in reputed journals and leads a
large group of scientists working in the area of enviromental biotechnology, whole cell biotransformation and recombinant therapeutics.

Abstract:

Human serum albumin (HSA) is an important therapeutic recommended for treatment against trauma, burn injury, hypoproteinemia, hypoalbumenia as well as for maintenance of homeostasis, transportation of hormones and microelements in blood. In this study, we report medium design and genetic strategies that lead to high production of this protein in the culture spernatant of Pichia pastoris. The codon-optimized gene for HSA was cloned downstream of α–factor secretory signal sequence and the mature HSA was secreted in the culture supenatant of P. pastoris under the control of alcohol oxidase 1 promoter. Extracellular protein level of 0.12, 0.40, 1.2 g/L were obtained in the un-optimized medium for 1-copy, 2-copy and 3-copy expression casettes respectively at shake flask level. Factors affecting production were identified which included initial peptone concentration, methanol concentration and temperature, amongst many other (pH, aeration, sorbitol concentration, initial inoculum) investigated parameters. A three level factorial design named central composite design using Plackett Burman response surface methodology was used to optimize the medium which lead to levels of protein up to 0.075, 0.40 and 0.98 g/L total extracellular protein for 1,2 and 3-copy constructs respectively. Under these conditions, HSA produced was stable and free of other contaminating proteins in the culture supernatant. A detailed transcriptome analysis of the recombinant P. pastoris, cultivated on unoptimized and optimized medium lead to identification of several protein coding transcripts which were up-regulated and helped in efficient HSA production and secretion. These were mapped to biochemical activities linked (and not restricted to) to carbon, nitrogen metabolism, gene transcription, protein transport and secretion. Additional genetic strategies applied included modification of signal sequences. Application of optimized medium to these mutants lead to stable production of HSA with reduced proteolytic degradation of the synthesized protein. This illustrated the robustness of the designed medium with a production of over 2 g/L protein at shakeflask level. An understanding of the underlying mechanisms is likely to play significant role in use of Pichia system for production of heterologous proteins.

Christopher Alexis Cedillo-Jimenez

Autonomous University of Queretaro, Mexico

Title: Exogenous application of dsRNA for fruit developmental improvment

Time : 15:20-15:40

Speaker
Biography:

Christopher Alexis Cedillo-Jimenez has completed his Bachelor’s degree in Food Chemistry, Master’s in Science of biosystems from molecular perspective, and a certificated Diploma for Greenhouse Engineering and now he is siding his PhD from Autonomous University of Queretaro. He is the Director of “DETAGS” (enterprise for development of ago-logistic technology) and “Motus collective” (arts, science and technology communication). His thesis work is related to genetic material that contain miRNA sequences related to ripening and developmental targets silencing to improve some qualities of fruits at plant
and postharvest level.

Abstract:

GMO has been proposed as an alternative to improve crops to: increase the yield and production volume, using fewer sources and to resist biotic and abiotic stress. However, the debate and public opinion is still divided, and the market is not ready for GMO related to food production. Interference-RNA knowledge has been used to develop spray-induced gene silencing (SIGS) for pests and diseases control. In this new technology, ectopic application of specific double-string RNA (dsRNA) provide resistance to plants to some pathogens like and verticillium that affect fruit production. Thus, it is an improvement in plant health and consequently in food production yield without using chemical compounds that has negative impact on the environment and even preventing resistant strains induction. However, in our knowledge there is no research nor applications of SIGS technology to elicit and modify plant physiology. Some authors had proven that dsRNA is locally absorbed and then translocated inside the plant, processed like small interference RNA and strikingly remains stable for 168 hours. In this work we discussed the potential use of dsRNA and miR395 interaction to targets potentially related to ethylene biosynthesis as a new engineering genetic without GMOs to delay ripening of climacteric fruits like tomato (fleshy and climacteric model fruit) which would contribute to decrease food wasting and even open new opportunities for postharvest management and agro-logistics.

Speaker
Biography:

Valeriya Zabelina has completed her PhD in the field of Genetics at the age of 26 years from Karazin Kharkiv National University, Ukraine, was involved
in teaching of Developmental biology and worked at the Laboratory of Germ and Stem Cells at the same University, Biology Faculty, Chair of Genetics
and Cytology. Then continued her postdoctoral studies at the Biology Centre of the Czech Academy of Sciences, Czech Republic under several European
projects (Mobitag, Postdoc Bioglobe), containing research stays abroad (Spain, Japan) and presenting her results at international meetings. She was also
involved in teaching of Developmental biology and supervision of a student at the University of South Bohemia, Czech Republic. At the moment she is
conducting her research in Japan under JSPS fellowship with the group working in transgenic silkworm. She has been a member of Ukrainian Society ofGenetisists and Breeders and Japanese Sericultural Society.

Abstract:

Current genetic engineering of the silkworm enables to produce new kinds of silk and to use silkworms as proteosynthetic
bioreactors for obtaining precious proteins. Nowadays a lot of target products derived from the silkworm are already
used in many areas of life from cosmetics through pharmacy, regenerative medicine to cosmonautics. The problem of
product standardization we propose to solve by easy and inexpensive decision – parthenocloning, which enables rapid
fixation of transformed genotypes and conservation of any unique man-made complexes. Parthenocloning is based on
exact copying of maternal genome and a single female initiates a clonal line with the same genetic and morphological
traits, which can be easily maintained without sexual reproduction as exclusively female populations. Such populations
exist already for more than 50 years as genetically stable females whose unfertilized eggs are induced to develop by
heat-shock treatment. This is the best time-tested evidence of genome stability. We constructed new non-diapausing
parthenogenetic strains and developed efficient injection method adapted for the eggs of parthenoclone. We showed
that transgenic silkworms could be obtained in high frequency and propagated as clonal populations. We obtained
successful transgenesis in a parthenoclone and inserted transgenes were faithfully transferred to successive generations.
We showed the possibility of cryopreservation of ovaries of transgenic clonal strains and obtained recovery as individuals
by ovary transplantation into female larvae, which opens door for cryobanking of any specific standardized genotypes
used for obtaining of precious target products.

Speaker
Biography:

Abstract:

The dose, in preclinical trial, refers to the amount of test material administered at once to study subject for
pharmacological evaluation. Acute toxicity study of three different pesticides (Dichlorvos, Chlorpyrifos and
Cypermethrin) with five level of doses each (10, 30, 50, 70 and 90) mg/kg body weight, were evaluated on15 Balb c mice
for a maximum period of 5 days. The main clinical signs and symptoms developed after treatment with five levels of doses
prepared from chloropyrifose was salivation, lacrimation, miosis (pinpoint eyes), trembling and breathing difficulty
with hypo-activity which was significantly manifested within about 30 minutes to 2 hours after treatment depending
on the amount of dose administered orally. Distended stomach, tremor and restlessness, breathing difficulty, salivation
and bulging eyes was the clinical signs of toxicity developed after treatment with the five levels of doses prepared from
Cypermethrin pesticide which was also administered orally. The Balb c Mice treated with five levels of doses prepared
from dichlorvos pesticide developed slow respiration immediately after oral administration. The dose had never limited
the toxic property of test chemicals but the magnitude of adverse effect and length of time at which the undesired
effect manifested in treated Balb c Mice. Even if the higher dose (90 mg/kg) from each test chemical was lethal within
24 hours, the second and third highest doses (70 & 50 mg/kg) which was prepared from Cypermethrin caused lethal
effect in the second day after dosing orally. This implies that the undesired effect of test chemicals was due to its toxic
reaction rate (r) in the biology of treated Balb c Mice. Blood samples from each treated Bulb c Mic were drawn from the
tail and facial vein using micro tubes labeled with numbers and quantitative immunoglobulins test had been conducted
using architect system – Abbot before treatment as reference test and four hours after treatment for comparison. The
toxic reaction rate and toxic severity of each test substances was then calculated using the formula [r =-(± lg plasma
concentration)] in mg/sec and (s = x 100) in %/sec respectively and recorded in different tables. The study revealed
that the value of toxic reaction rate (r) determines the margin of safety whereas the value of toxic severity (s) of test
chemicals predicts the length of time at which lethal effect of test substance might be manifested in treated Balb c Mice.
Tested doses with calculated value of toxic reaction rate (r) less than zero had no lethal effect to treated Balb c Mice. This
means that the administered test chemicals had negligible adverse effect at the organismal level rather than at the cellular
level. A test substance said to be toxic not only when it causes death but also pharmacological mechanism against the
biology of an organism. If the higher dose kills treated organism, the lower dose is most likely to have a higher risk of ill
health in the long run. There is no scientific ground to categorise a single test material as safe dose (ED50) and lethal dose
(LD50). It is most likely to be a waste of time and resources to categorise a single test chemical as effective dose (ED50)
and lethal dose (LD50) at a period of time during the experiment and proceed to the next phase of preclinical trial with
inadequately validated data. The presentation will have more details on single dose acute toxicology in preclinical trial.