Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 13th Biotechnology Congress San Francisco, USA.

Day 2 :

Keynote Forum

Fuad Fares

University of Haifa, Israel

Keynote: A novel strategy for developing long acting recombinant proteins: From bench to bedside

Time : 10:00-10:50

Conference Series Bio America 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Fuad Fares photo
Biography:

Fuad Fares has completed his MSc and DSc studies at the Faculty of Medicine, Technion-Israel Institute of Technology and Postdoctoral studies at the Department of Molecular Biology and Pharmacology, School of Medicine, Washington University, St. Louis Missouri, USA. He has developed the Molecular Genetic Laboratory at Carmel Medical Center, Haifa, Israel and led the laboratory last 20 years until 2015. He is the Head of Molecular Genetic Laboratory at the Department of Human Biology, University of Haifa, Israel since 2004 and teaching genetics, genetic engineering and endocrinology at the Faculty of Natural Sciences at University of Haifa, Israel. He has published more than 90 manuscripts in reputed journals and serving as a Member of the Israel Council for Higher Education since 15 years. Moreover, he is the Founder and the Inventor of PROLOR Biotech Company for designing long-acting recombinant proteins.

Abstract:

One major issue regarding the clinical use of many peptides is their short half-life due to the rapid clearance from the circulation. To overcome this problem, we succeeded to ligate the signal sequence of O-linked oligosaccharides to the coding sequence of the hormones. The cassette gene that has been used contains the sequence of the carboxyl-terminal peptide (CTP) of human chorionic gonadotropin b (hCGb) subunit. The CTP contains 28 amino acids with four O-linked oligosaccharide recognition sites. It was postulated that O-linked oligosaccharides add flexibility, hydrophilicity and stability to the protein. On the other hand it was suggested that the four O-linked oligosaccharides play an important role in preventing plasma clearance and thus increasing the half-life of the protein in circulation. Using this strategy we succeeded to ligate the CTP to the coding sequence of follitropin (FSH), thyrotropin (TSH), erythropoietin (EPO) growth hormone (GH) and thus to increase the longevity and bioactivity of these proteins in-vivo. Interestingly, the new analogs of FSH and GH were found not immunogenic in human and it is already passed successfully clinical trials phase III and phase II respectively. Moreover, FSH long acting was approved by the European Commission (EC) for treatment of fertility. In addition, our results indicated that long acting GH is not toxic in monkeys and the results from clinical trials phase I and phase II seem to be promising. Designing long acting peptides will diminish the cost of these drugs and perhaps reduce the number of injections in the clinical protocols.

Conference Series Bio America 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Edward Crabbe photo
Biography:

Edward Crabbe completed his PhD in Kyushu University, Fukuoka, Japan. He is a Senior Scientist in the Manufacturing Sciences and Technology Division of Bristol-Myers Squibb facility located in Syracuse. New York.

Abstract:

In commercial manufacturing of biopharmaceutical products using mammalian cell culture bioprocessing, variation in bioreactor product titer could have a significant impact on drug substance yield without having a significant effect on drug substance critical quality attributes. Variation in titer presents potential drug supply challenges to an organization and its patients. At commercial scale, applying any mitigation strategy to alleviate variation in bioreactor product titer faces technical challenges for manufacturing processes that utilize semi-defined production media, varying production scales, different process technologies, and multiple manufacturing facilities.

The contribution of raw material lot-to-lot variability in semi-defined production media on product titer is well-documented. Mitigating variation in product titer due to raw material lot-to-lot variability involves considerable in-house investment in time and resources as well as collaborations with vendors and external partners.

In this presentation, we mitigated the impact of raw material lot-to-lot variability on bioreactor product titer by leveraging process characterization information, manufacturing process history analysis, and facility fit considerations to improve bioreactor product titer by 10% while maintaining product quality.

  • Industrial and Microbial Biotechnology, Biotechnology and its Applications, Nano Biotechnology
Location: Sausalito
Biography:

Currently, I am working as Marie Curie Fellow at Synthetic Biology Research Centre, The University of Nottingham, UK. I am working in the area of Biorefinery using Metabolic Engineering and Synthetic Biology tools for the sustainable production of biofuels and biochemicals through second generation biorefinery. So far I have published 19 research articles, two book chapters and two review articles. I have done my PhD (Biochemical Engineering & Biotechnology) and M.Sc (Chemistry) from Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India. I have more than 13 years of research experience including my PhD and 5 year Post-Doctoral experience (France, S Korea, UK). In last 13 years, I got exposed to various areas of Biotechnology; Biochemical Engineering, Microbial Fermentations, Plant cell Technology, Agricultural Biotechnology, Metabolic Engineering and Industrial Biotechnology. I worked on different biological systems; fungal, yeast and bacterial and carried out research in multidimensional projects aiming at “Development of low cost, energy efficient and sustainable Bioprocesses for production of Biofertilizers, Biopesticides, Biofuels and Biochemicals”.

Abstract:

The 2,3-butanediol (BDO) is produced as a major byproduct during the production of 1,3- propanediol (PDO) from glycerol under limited aeration conditions by Klebsiella pneumoniae. In thepresent study, The BDO pathway genes, budA, budB, budC and budO (whole-bud operon), were deleted from K. pneumoniae J2B ΔldhA and the mutants were studied for glycerol metabolism and alcohols (PDO, BDO) production. Only the budO deletion mutant could completely abolish BDO production, but it exhibited serious reduction in cell growth and PDO production. By modifying culture medium such as increasing buffering capacity (from 29 mM phosphate to 100 mM phosphate) and adding bicarbonate (50 mM), the performance of the budO deletion mutant could be recovered to a similar level of the base strain (91.1 mM PDO under microaerobic condition) on flask scale. However, in fed-batch bioreactor experiment, the budO deletion mutant produced significantly less PDO (502 mM) than the base strain (753 mM). In addition, the budO deletion mutant produced significant amount of pyruvate (>73 mM) and lactate (>38 mM). The low PDO production in K. pneumoniae J2B ΔldhAΔbudO was attributed to the accumulation of glycolytic intermediates such as dihydroxyacetone and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate, which are highly inhibitory to glycerol dehydratase.

Yogita Patil-Sen

University of Central Lancashire, UK

Title: Magnetoliposomes for hyperthermia cancer therapy
Biography:

Yogita obtained her PhD from the University of Manchester, UK and gained some postdoctoral experience at the University of Manchester and the University of Central Lancashire (UCLan). Currently, she is a Daphne Jackson Fellow at UCLan and her research is jointly funded by the Royal Society of Chemistry and UCLan. Yogita’s research interests are in the field of synthesis of different types of nanoparticles for targeted drug deliveryand cancer therapy. She has published nine research articles in high impact factor international journals. Yogita is a member of the Royal Society of Chemistry and the American Chemical Society.  

Abstract:

Magnetoliposomes, hybrid nanoparticles made of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs)coated with liposomes, are emerging as new class of bio-nanomaterials due to their potential applications in targeted drug deliveryand hyperthermia cancer therapy. Coating SPIONs with liposomes enhances their biocompatibility anddispersibility and therefore their applicability in biomedical applications.The hyperthermia treatment is based on the fact that SPIONs, when subjected to an oscillating magnetic field generate heat and thus can kill tumor cells which are more sensitive to temperature above 41 °C than the normal cells. The amount of heat generated by SPIONs is strongly dependent upon their magnetic properties, which in turn are deteremined by their physico-chemical properties i.e. size and shape as well as coating material.

 

Herein we report the heating ability of bare SPIONs and core-shell type magnetoliposomes,which was measured using magnetic hyperthermia kit. SPIONs were coated with mixed lipid systems of phospholipids and cholesterol and the anticancer drug doxorubicin was encapsulated in the core-shell structure. The drug loading and release efficiency of bare and lipid coated SPIONs was also investigated. The results suggest that the drug loading efficiency increased upon lipid coating and drug release is much more controlled under the alternating magnetic field which indicates that magnetoliposomesare promising drug delivery vehicles for magnetic hyperthermia based cancer therapy.

Biography:

Varsha Mehra has completed her PhD at the age of 28 years from University of Delhi . She is currently Assistant Professor in the Department of Biomedical Science, Shaheed Rajguru College of Applied Sciences for Women, a premier science college in the  University of Delhi .She has a few  publications in reputed international journals and currently engaged in Research Project on finding efficacious  plant based drugs against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

Abstract:

Spices are considered as rich source of bio-active antimicrobial compounds and are indispensable components of cuisines worldwide. They have been used since long to enhance the flavor and aroma of our foods. Besides, they also produce several medicinal effects and are used in treating various clinical ailments. To provide a scientific basis to traditional uses of Elletaria cardamomum, Syzygium aromaticum and Piper nigrum, their seed extracts as well as isolated phyto-constituents and combinations were evaluated for their antibacterial and antioxidant potential. Total phenol, flavonoid, condensed tannins and saponin contents were also measured. Organic extracts of all three spices showed good antibacterial activity against all the test strains, which was found to be comparable with standard antibiotics. Minimum inhibitory concentration for aqueous and organic seed extracts ranged from 25 to >50 mg/ml and 2 to 50 mg/ml respectively. Among the different extracts evaluated for DPPH free radical scavenging, ethanolic extract of S. aromaticum exhibited the highest inhibition with the IC50 value of 42 ± 7.4 µg/ml. This high radical scavenging activity can be directly correlated with the presence of high total phenolic content (310 ± 6.87 mg GAEs/g extract) possessed by the extract. Inhibitory activity of all the extracts was found to be increased, when used in combination. These findings suggest that these spices enhanced the functionality of the food in which they are used by effectively influencing their antioxidant and antibacterial potential.

Biography:

Shaharm Teimourian has completed his PhD at the age of 32 years from Tehran University and postdoctoral studies from Oxford University School of Medicine. He is the Director of medical genetics and biotechnology department. He has published more than 25 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an Editorial board member of Edorium journal of molecular biology and world journal of hematology.

Abstract:

Abnormal cell differentiation,in particular suppression of terminal cell differentiation, exits in all tumors. Therapeutic interventions to restore terminal differentiation (“differentiation therapy”) are a very attractive way to treat cancer, especially leukemia.A variety of chemicals stimulates differentiation of leukemic cells, such as dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA). Tumor suppressor geneshave a vital role in thegateway to terminal cell differentiation.

In this study we inhibited PTENtumor suppressor gene expression by siRNA to investigate the effect of potentiating cell survival and inhibiting apoptosis on HL-60 cell differentiation by DMSO and ATRA at the same time we looked at Netosis.

Our results show that PTEN siRNA increasesHL-60 cell differentiation in the presence of DMSO and ATRA. At the same time the presence of siRNA hampered accumulation of apoptotic cells during incubation. PTEN siRNA reduced Net formation by differentiated neutrophils

Conclusion: Our study suggests potential usage of differentiation therapy in PTEN mutated AML leukemia.

Biography:

R. Yamada has completed his PhD at the age of 27 years from Kobe university and postdoctoral studies from Kobe university. Then he moved as assistant professor to Osaka prefecture university. He has published more than 35 papers in journals related to applied microbilogy and biochemical enginnering.

Abstract:

The use of renewable feedstocks for producing biofuels and bio-based chemicals by engineering metabolic pathways of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has recently become an attractive option. Many researchers attempted to accelerate glycolysis by overexpressing some glycolytic enzymes because most target bio-based chemicals are derived through glycolysis. However these attempts have met with little success. In this study, to create a S. cerevisiae strain with high glycolytic flux, we used multi-copy integration to develop a novel global metabolic engineering strategy. Then a novel global metabolic engineering strategy was applied for D-lactate production.

Among approximately 350 metabolically engineered strains, YPH499/dPdA3-34 exhibited the highest glucose consumption rate. This strain showed 1.3-fold higher cell growth rate and glucose consumption rate than the control strain YPH499/dPdAW. Real-time PCR analysis revealed that transcription levels of glycolysis-related genes such as HXK2, PFK1, PFK2, PYK2, PGI1, and PGK1 in YPH499/dPdA3-34 were increased. Besides, by using global metabolic engineering strategy, D-lactate was efficinetly produced.

This study successfully developed a novel global metabolic engineering strategy for S. cerevisiae, improving glucose consumption rate through optimizing the expression of glycolysis-related enzymes. The method detailed here is a promising approach to optimize S. cerevisiae metabolic pathways, thereby improving bio-based chemicals production using this organism.

Biography:

Dr. Kamna Srivastava did her B. Pharm, M.Pharm and Ph.D. from Department of Pharmacology, Institute of Technology, Banaras Hindu University, INDIA. She held her  Post-Doctoral positions in National Institute of Immunology; All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi. Presently, Dr. Kamna is Assistant Professor working in Molecular Cardiology Lab in Dr. B R Ambedkar Centre for Biomedical Research, Delhi University. Her on-going project is focused on the identifying the potential biomarkers for cardiovascular diseases.  Dr. Kamna has more than 30 research publications to her credit and recipient of grants from DST, CSIR and ICMR India.

Abstract:

Objectives: Hypertension is one of the major cardiovascular diseases. Candidate genes encoding the Renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS), ie, Angiotensin Converting enzyme (ACE), Angiotensinogen, Angiotensin II Type I receptor, Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and Aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2), their expression at genetic and protein levels and their association with essential hypertension, if any, were investigated in a Northern Indian population.

Methods:  Genotyping and Gene expression at mRNA and protein levels was carried out by PCR-RFLP,  Real time PCR and Western blot respectively.

Results: A significant association was found in the AT1R genotypes (AC+CC) with essential hypertension. The expression of angiotensinogen was also upregulated in patients as compared to controls. The decreased levels of ANP gene expression at mRNA (85%) and protein (72.6%) levels and increased in CYP11B2 protein expression (1.53 fold) in the patient group as compared to controls were found. The individuals with rare allele in Angiotensinogen gene were found to have significant control in blood pressure with ACE inhibitor, Enalapril.

Conclusion: Our findings suggest the association of candidate gene of RAAS with essential hypertension. The increased expression of Angiotensinogen converting enzyme, Angiotensinogen, Angiotensin II Type I receptor gene and decreased levels of ANP gene expression at mRNA and protein levels in the patient group as compared to controls were significantly associated with essential hypertension and could be served as a prognostic biomarker for essential hypertension.

Biography:

Hui Wang has been studying for his PhD from Southeast University School of Energy and Environment. He majored in soil science and heavy mental pollution renovation. He has published one paper in reputed journals.

Abstract:

The soil microbial fuel cell (MFC) is a promising biotechnology for the bioelectricity recovery as well as the remediation soil. Moreover there were no studies on the heavy mental pollution in a soil MFC yet. A soil MFC was constructed to remediate the contamination soil and the electric field was generated from the oxidation of the acetate at the anode. We demonstrated that the copper migration, the power generation and the pH variation in the soil and the electrodes. The maximal voltage and the power density of 539 mV and 65.77m W/m2 were obtained in the soil MFC. The chemical fractionation of copper (Cu) was analyzed with a modified BCR sequential extraction method. The soluble Cu form and the total Cu contents from the anode to the cathode increased, and the difference between them kept growing over time. The Cu fractions in the soil and the electrodes were converted with the change of the dramatic pH from the anode to the cathode. There was a focusing effect leading to the change of the copper forms and the extractable acid form content increased in the three-fifths where the acid and the alkali fronts met.

Biography:

Xian Cao study as a PhD candidate at School of Energy and Environment, Southeast University. His majored in microbial fuel cells (MFCs). He has published one paper in reputed journals.

Abstract:

In this study, the soil microbial fuel cells (MFCs) were constructed based on sandy soil to remove the refractory organic pesticide hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in topsoil by a simple method. The construction of membrane less single-chamber soil MFCs by setting up the cathode and the anode activated carbon, inoculating the sludge and adding the co-substrates can promote HCB removal significantly. The results showed that HCB removal efficiencies in the soils contaminated with 40 mg/kg, 80 mg/kg, and 200 mg/kg were 71.14%, 62.15% and 50.06%, respectively, which were 18.65%, 18.46% and 19.17% higher than in the control, respectively. The electricity generation of soil MFCs in different HCB concentrations were analyzed. The highest power density reached 70.8 mW/m2, and an internal resistance of approximately 960Ω was obtained when an external resistance loading of 1000Ω was connected. Meanwhile, the influences of temperature, substrate species and substrate concentrations on soil MFCs initial electricity production were investigated. The temperature between 25oC and 30oC had no influence on the initial electricity production in the soil MFC while the impacts of the substrate concentration were significant. The addition of the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) into the soil MFCs system contributed to the improvement of HCB removal efficiency.

Biography:

Arezou Pakfar holds a Master degree in Cellular and Molecular Biology at Islamic Azad University, Iran. Her thesis was about Tissue Engineering and stem cells. She is working as a Researcher at Stem Cell Technology Research Center since 2014.

Abstract:

Introduction: Application of activated Platelet-Rich Plasma (PRP) with its vast range of cytokines and growth factors has achieved a considerable attention for chondrogenic differentiation in tissue engineering fields. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the effects of PRP on human adipose derived MSC chondrogenesis.

Material & Methods: MSCs were differentiated using different PRP concentrations (5% and 15%). Changes in gene expression levels for cartilage and bone specific markers (COLII, AGC, SMAD2, SOX9) and (RUNX, Osteocalcin), respectively, were appraised by real time PCR. Also chondrogenesis was assessed by measuring secreted glucosaminoglycan in the medium or that kept in cell ECM. The expression of pathologic markers was evaluated by measuring the VEGF, TNFα secretion and alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium deposition.

Results: The most secreted VEGF (p<0.05) in 5% and 15% concentration were anti-angiogenesis. The inflammation factor (TNF-α) quantity of 5% PRP was the lowest (p<0.05) on 21st day but chemotaxic characteristics of the mentioned group was the highest. The expression levels of AGC, SOX9, COLII and RUNX were significantly (p<0.05) down-regulated while Osteocalcin was up-regulated. In addition, hypertrophy was seen in chondrogenic differentiation.

Conclusion: Due to having vast range of biologic active factors, PRP based chondrogenesis of human adipose derived MSC is dose dependent and the undesired outcomes due to absence of regulatory factors, should be suppressed by further optimizing the formulation of chondrogenic differentiation media.