Scientific Program

Conference Series Ltd invites all the participants across the globe to attend 13th Biotechnology Congress San Francisco, USA.

Day 1 :

Keynote Forum

Xiaohua He

United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, USA

Keynote: Outbreaks of Shiga toxin-related poisoning and methods for early detection

Time : 10:00-10:50

Conference Series Bio America 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Xiaohua He photo
Biography:

Dr. Xiaohua He is a Research Molecular Biologist at the Western Regional Research Center, USDA-ARS.  She completed her Ph.D. from UC Riverside, and had Post-doc experiences at Purdue and Cornell Universities.  Dr. He received the 2015 USDA Federal Laboratory Consortium for Technology Transfer, Far West Region, Outstanding Technology Development Award for her contribution to the development of novel monoclonal antibodies against a broad range of Shiga toxins.  She has served as academic editor and editorial board member of several leading journals and is an author/inventor of over 70 publications and patents, with 14 technologies licensed to industry.  

Abstract:

Shiga toxin  (Stx) is one of the major virulence factors produced by Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) and is noted for its association with a wide spectrum of diseases, such as hemorrhagic colitis (HC) and hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS), the leading cause of acute renal failure in children.  The outbreaks caused by Stx have raised serious public health concerns and resulted in huge economic losses.  In 1982 the first reported outbreak of STEC was caused by an E. coli O157:H7 serotype in undercooked hamburger, but in a report published in 2012, six non-O157 serotypes were revealed to be responsible for 113,000 illness annually in the United States alone, almost double the amount of illness caused by O157.  Other sera-groups, including the highly virulent E. coli O104:H4, have also caused large outbreaks of HC and HUS.  As the sources of outbreaks have changed, a variety of detection methods for Stxs and organisms that produce them have evolved as well.  Here, we will discuss the recent advances on the detection, characterization and typing of Stxs with emphasis on work performed at the Western Regional Research Center, USDA, ARS.

Keynote Forum

Luisa Cheng

United States Department of Agriculture-Agricultural Research Service, USA

Keynote: New methods for the detection and mitigation of food-borne toxins

Time : 11:10-12:00

Conference Series Bio America 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Luisa Cheng photo
Biography:

Foodborne toxins such as botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and mycotoxins are foodborne toxins that cause severe human diseases. Because of their acute toxicity, there are intense research efforts to develop sensitive detection tools, vaccines and therapeutics.  In our laboratories, high-affinity monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been developed for the detection of different BoNT serotypes in commonly used ELISA and new immunoassays using electrochemiluminescence and microfluidic platforms.  Detection limits of these new assays fall within the pg/ml range, well below those of standard assays for BoNTs.  New gas chromatography and mass spectrometry (GC/MS) methods are tested for the early detection of fungal contamination in nut products.  A better understanding of the biology of toxins in plants and animals and the factors that affect their toxicity, coupled with the development of more sensitive detection and simpler diagnostic tests, would be invaluable for advancing food safety and protection.

Abstract:

Dr. Cheng completed her Ph.D. at the University of California, Los Angeles, and her post-doctoral research at the University of California, Berkeley – focusing in the pathogenesis of foodborne pathogens.  Dr. Cheng joined the Agricultural Research Service in the U.S. Department of Agriculture in 2006 and is currently the Research Leader of the Foodborne Toxin Detection and Prevention Research Unit in the Western Regional Research Center.  Dr. Cheng’s research program focuses on the development of sensitive detection assays for foodborne toxins; the study of biological mechanisms underlying toxin absorption and action; and the identification of prevention and therapeutic strategies.

Keynote Forum

Zhanyuan J Zhang,

University of Missouri, USA

Keynote: Plant transformation services

Time : 12:00-12:50

Conference Series Bio America 2016 International Conference Keynote Speaker Zhanyuan J Zhang, photo
Biography:

Dr. Zhanyuan J. Zhang has completed his PhD at the age of 39 years from University of Nebraks-Lincoln, USA and postdoctoral studies from the same University. He is the director of Plant Transformation Core Facility at University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, a land-grant University. He has published more than 30 papers in reputed journals and has been serving as an editorial board member of two international journals. He is also a peer reviewer of over 10 international journals.

Abstract:

University of Missouri (MU) Plant Transformation Core Facility was established in 2000. The key mission of the Facility is to enhance both basic and applied plant biology research by providing plant transformation services and advancing transgenic technologies. Since 2000, the Facility has been providing state-of-the-art plant transformation services. The services are on fees for cost recovery only, not for profit. The facility staff is dedicated to providing various types of transformation services with a focus on maize (Zea mays), soybean (Glycine max), switchgrass (Panicum virgatum), sorghum (Sorghum bicolor), wheat (Triticum aestivum), and model plant species. The service categories include both standard and customized transformation. Transformation systems for all crops utilize Agrobacterium-mediated approaches and somatic embryogenesis processes except for soybean. The Agrobacterium-mediated cot-node transformation system coupled with organogenesis regime is employed for soybean transformation. The facility is also ready to take on new service projects to transform new plant species as user’s requests. Research activities are geared towards developing high-throughput transformation systems, effective small RNA-mediated gene silencing, gene stacking through coordinated transgene expression, and precise genome modifications to meet the needs of crop improvement and genome discoveries. More details on the facility operations and experiences as well as its impact on research collaborations and funding opportunities will be discussed wherever appropriate during the talk. Readers should find out more about MU Plant Transformation Core Facility at http://plantsci.missouri.edu/muptcf/, email to  Zhanyuan J. Zhang at [email protected], or call facility office at 573-882-6922.